Group 24 battery- long trip planned

Discussion in 'Power - Site Power/Batteries/Generators/Solar' started by jmkay1, Aug 31, 2018.

  1. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    I have a group 24 deep cycle battery. Im in no position unfortunately to change it at this time. I have a full week long trip planned and will only have battery power for that entire time. I plan to switch over to LED lights now but in you experience if I was to really conserve my power using lights only when really needed and say operate the water pump once a day for a short time for dishes and maybe 1 quick navy shower, can I make a full week without going beyond half charge? I won't be able to charge the battery until I get back on the road to go home unfortunately. My phone will be charged in the car or by a separate battery pack. I will use my head lantern more for light. So mainly concerned about the water pump. I won't use anything else on 12v. If it was just my lights I know I could easily make it, but I have no clue how to judge the water pump. i will be monitoring the battery daily with my multimeter and will adjust as needed but trying to get a base line to go on. Thanks all and happy camping.
     
  2. joet

    joet Well-Known Member

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    A lot of newer fridges use power for their control boards. The water pump will be your biggest power user. and power usage varies with different pumps
     
  3. BikeNFish

    BikeNFish Well-Known Member

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    Converting to LED is a great start, but as joet said, it depends on your pup. My propane sensor tends to drain my battery, so I unhook the battery leads when I'm not using the pup.

    The condition and age of your battery also has a lot to do with how much charge you have. If you have a newer battery, you may be able to make it last.

    There are a lot of options available to charge your battery. If your vehicle can charge your pup battery while you drive, you may have the option to at least partly charging the battery mid week, but you would have to let your vehicle idle more than the recommended 15 minutes.

    Another option is to purchase and FULLY charged a second battery. Then you could just swap out the battery when it drops to 50%. I carry two extra group 27 batteries on my trips but also have a generator to keep them charged.

    You could also purchase a solar charger as another option, but that can be expensive to get the proper setup.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2018
  4. JimmyM

    JimmyM Well-Known Member

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    The pump will draw the most, but it doesn't run very long. Personally, I don't treat the 50% rule as law. Just a guide line. Only cycling the battery down to 50%, it will last, say, 800 cycles. Drawing it down to 25% it might last only 100 cycles. Sure, it's only going to live 1/8 as long. But that 100 cycles is if every discharge is to 25% (These numbers are just examples). Also, how many times do you cycle the battery that low per year? 10 times? The battery will "age to death" before it "cycles to death". A good battery, very well cared for, will last 10 years TOPS. I only count on 7 years. For your week long trip, don't sweat 1 deep discharge.
    However, do charge it back up as soon as possible.
    A very deeply discharged battery will want to draw a lot of current when hooked up to the vehicle. After you hook it back up, check that you didn't pop any fuses.
     
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  5. SteveP

    SteveP Well-Known Member

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    Same feelings here. There are several things you can do to charge your current battery, but the more effective ones will cost you more than a second g24 battery. Just make sure that it's fully charged before you leave, showing a voltage of 12.8+ volts after the chargers been off at least 4 hours. And make sure it can't be banged around or tipped over during transit. You can carry it in your 4Runner safely if it's not being charged in transit.

    If you decide to do more dry camping in the future you can start planning your long term strategy when you get back from your trip.
     
  6. bols2Dawall

    bols2Dawall S.W. Ontario

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    Take jugs of water and try to use the pump as little as possible or not at all
     
  7. JimmyM

    JimmyM Well-Known Member

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    Let's do a little math...
    LED bulbs 0.1A each x 4 on at a time for 2 hours per day = 0.8AH / Day <- essentially nothing
    Water pump running at 8A for a total of 30min per day = 4AH / Day
    Propane detector .25A (read estimates from .1A to .33A) constant = 6AH / day
    Total 10.8AH / day (72AH battery used down to 25% SoC = 54 AH usable
    54 / 10.8 = 5 days
    So, that tiny little propane detector uses most of your power.
    Edit: I just found an Atwood LP detector manual that states it uses .075A
    Here's the updated math
    LED bulbs 0.1A each x 4 on at a time for 2 hours per day = 0.8AH / Day <- essentially nothing
    Water pump running at 8A for a total of 30min per day = 4AH / Day
    Propane detector .075A (From Atwood manual) constant = 1.8AH / day
    Total 6.6AH / day (72AH battery used down to 25% SoC = 54 AH usable
    54 / 6.6 = 8.2 days
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2018
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  8. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    Thanks everyone. I'm thinking at least when I'm away from camp I can disconnect the battery to prevent the power draw from the detector. I do bring a jug of water for drinking and cooking so the only time the pump will be used is for the dinner dishes. There I usually don't use much. My tent camping days have taught me to be very mindful of water usage. If it appears my battery is running too far down I will do what I did back in my tent days. Camping clean is good enough. [:P]
     
  9. MNTCamper

    MNTCamper Well-Known Member

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    You will be fine. I have gone for 10 days on a group 24, although I don't use my water pump. The rest of the stuff draws virtually nothing.
     
  10. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    Ask yourself this: what would happen if you ran out of battery power?

    Can't use the faucets/shower.
    Can't use the lights.
    Can't use the fridge.

    Throw some blue ice packs into the freezer. Bring along a cooler. If you run out of battery power, move the fridge contents into the cooler with the ice packs. If there is a store nearby, you can always go buy some ice.

    Have some battery lanterns, etc. If you run out of battery power, use those to light the interior.

    Bring some water pitchers, containers. If you run out of battery power, use the campground water in pitchers for flushing the toilet, dish washing, etc.

    It's not a major problem if your battery dies mid-trip. You're a camper - just go with the flow.
     
  11. bols2Dawall

    bols2Dawall S.W. Ontario

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    Dinner dishes ? You mean paper plates :)
     
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  12. MNTCamper

    MNTCamper Well-Known Member

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    He has a 2004, the fridge runs all on its own without any battery, just like the one in my 2001. They are pretty simple. Might have to go to bed not too long after it gets dark though. There really isn't any emergency if you run out of battery.
     
  13. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    I have a 1975 - no battery pull. I wasn't sure when it changed - good to know.
     
  14. speckhunter80

    speckhunter80 Well-Known Member

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    Use the battery charger you are driving....turn your tow vehicle around and connect the camper battery to the running tow battery with a pair of heavy duty jumper cables. Do this every other day for 30 minutes and you will be golden.
     
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  15. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    See if they make a battery powered gas detector , then cut the wires to the hardwired one, or put in a inline cut off switch.
     
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  16. neighbormike

    neighbormike Well-Known Member

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    ^^^ Glad someone finally said it! [:D]
     

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