Hauling water

Discussion in 'Boondocking' started by Dingit, Jul 3, 2020.

  1. HappyTraveler

    HappyTraveler Well-Known Member

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    Can't really help answer your question, but wanted to comment. ;)
    First, when I clicked on your first link and saw the image, my thought was how small that tank is. Then, reading the details saw it's 110 gallons.
    My second comment is more general in that it's nice to have it and not need it, rather than to need it and not have it. That being said, there's nothing that says you have carry that tank full on each and every trip; but it's nice if you think you might need that much water. Maybe try an experiment and see how much water you actually do use and need. Then you can buy the correct size and not spend more money than you need to.
    Finally, would it be possible to fill up with fresh water closer to where you will be camping? That way you won't be hauling hundreds of pounds all those miles.
    Good luck in your search and hope you can find something that works for you. :)
     
  2. Grandpa Don

    Grandpa Don Well-Known Member

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    I made a water transfer pump system using a 12 Volt pump I got from Harbor Freight for about $45.00 and a small 12 volt battery. I mounted it all in a small ammo can. I can take it with me down to the stream to fill buckets or other water cans and then I use it to transfer the water from the cans to the on-board tank in the camper. The battery last for ever. But I can charge it from a 12Volt power source in the camper. I don't drink the stream water or any water in my camper tank. I always take along two 5 gallon containers of filtered water from home for drinking. The camper water is only used for washing dishes or my hands. I also use it for flushing my porti-potti.
     
  3. Dingit

    Dingit Well-Known Member

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    I do travel with a couple Aquatainers which are kind of like jerry cans. I either need more or...this tank thing.

    The sloshing is a concern which is one more reason I like the idea of two smaller tanks. I like some of these other tanks better than the one I first linked. Since they'd just be used to refill the popup's tank, there's no real advantage to just 1 big one. I guess I could find a baffled tank or add baffle balls but smaller tanks would just be much easier to deal with anyway.

    Brakes should be fine. I'm assuming. Probably. I know they are designed for a bigger load at least...

    Good point, HappyTraveler, about only getting what I need. Of course it depends on where, when, and how long! Two tanks is more flexible. (And more $ I'm sure.)

    Looks like Grandpa Don has already figured out my gray tank solution. Hehehe! Future project!
     
  4. bw1974

    bw1974 New Member

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    Found a 55gal plastic barrel for water storage ($8 on Marketplace). I'll be using it the roughly 16 days i'm in the wildness of the Rocky Mountains while elk hunting. I will be pulling my Fleetwood-Utah from NC to CO. In town, before traversing the jeep trails up into the mountains I will stop and fill my tank and the barrel with water. I'll have the barrel in the bed of my truck. Shouldn't need more, as I'll have jugs of drinking water and only use this water for washing dishes and showers.
     
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  5. Tarry R Long

    Tarry R Long New Member

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  6. tfischer

    tfischer A bad day camping beats a good day at the office

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    Long thread here, admittedly I didn't read it all.

    I would find a way to find water at your destination. Short of boondocking in a forest, I can't think of a time where no water would be available where camping is allowed. But assuming that your situation has that... consider other sources like driving into a nearby town. There are videos on YT on how to find "free" water.

    Also since quantity seems to be in question: We are camping totally self-contained this year, meaning no public restrooms. That has brought our water usage up considerably, since so much hand-washing happens in-pup now that used to happen in-restroom. We have an 18 gallon tank, and with this level of use we can get 3-4 days out of it. That includes water for our dog, handwashing, coffee, cooking, dishes, etc. That does not include drinking water or water for the toilet, which we fill separately. This is for a family of 4 and our dog.

    I don't feel we are being overly wasteful with water.
     
  7. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member Platinum Supporting Member

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    @tfischer - out here in the West, there are some campgrounds that do not have water at all, or it may be off for the season or other reasons. Often very basic, with a minimum of services, IIRC there are some that are "Carry it out" for garbage too. Years ago, when still tent camping, the day we planned to refill our water jugs, a crew arrived and took the one camp spigot out of service, it had tested high for ecoli or something. Some of the US Forest Service campgrounds in NM opened late this year, but with the caution that the water was not turned on.
    After 30+ seasons, we tend to carry more water than we think we'll need until we can refill, just in case. Now that we have an on-board tank, we travel with it filled. More than ever this year, we plan to be self-contained; being able to use our own toilet and kitchen on the road has always been nice, this year a must. Also, if we have to stop for an unexpected night on the road, being ready to camp is handy. [Our minimum travel day is around 3 hours, which is seldom; generally is it 5-9 hours.] The campground we'll be in for a few days next month is a good 45 minutes from the nearest town. We use the dump station at the sewage plant there, but I'm not sure I'd trust to fill up with potable water there, I've seen how people behave at any dump station.
    In some of the public campgrounds we use, such as USFS, there are water spigots around the campground, but more and more are prohibiting hooking a hose up to fill RV tanks, to prevent contamination of the system is the reasoning.
     
  8. Dingit

    Dingit Well-Known Member

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    Isn't Minnesota the land of a billion lakes? Yup, it's very different out here! :)

    Forest service campgrounds that DO have water don't have places to fill up a tank unless you want to be THAT GUY. But we get by fine with our tiny tank in places that do have water by using Aquatainers and filling the pasta or coffee pot at the spigot.

    Last year we were at a favorite campground in the Mojave Preserve. The water was off for an estimated 3 years for upgrades. We knew this ahead of time and were prepared (partly by taking a different camper with a larger tank), but sometimes you don't know until you arrive.
     
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  9. tfischer

    tfischer A bad day camping beats a good day at the office

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    We have a 5 gallon collapsible container that we use to top off the pup. I bought an oil-change funnel that is dedicated to this task as well: I send the boys off to fill up the container and then they dump it into the pup with the funnel. If I am totally empty it would take 4 trips to fill our tank, but we usually are proactive and just throw one in every so often if we know we'll be needing more water.

    That would get you around the "don't directly hook it up to the camper" problem. Of course if they'd just use a vacuum breaker they wouldn't hae to worry about it.
     
  10. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member Platinum Supporting Member

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    The tap in one that is used to supply the host site does have a back flow preventer. Most of the others don't have threaded spigots anymore. We used to carry a water thief, but they tend to rot before we need them again. Even with filling jugs, sometimes a short hose is handy - I've encountered too enough spigots over the years, holding a jug while it fills from a spigot isn't easy for me these days, hence the smaller jugs we use most of the time.
    I tried the funnel route, rattle siphon is much easier to use for us - no tipping the jug, and the hose gets past the slight dip in our intake hose. If the hose isn't past that, the water just pours back out.
     
  11. tfischer

    tfischer A bad day camping beats a good day at the office

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    Siphon is a good idea. But how do you get it up high enough over your fill valve?

    I have two teen boys that can do the heavy lifting for me ;)
     
  12. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member Platinum Supporting Member

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    The rattle siphon works well enough I only have to set the jugs on a table next to the water intake. Usually I use the table that's set high for cooking, at around 32". Even with my creaky joints, I can manage to lift 2-1/2 gallons that high. Since the hose end goes into the trailer's fill hose, it's well below the level of the table. (I can do the 4 gallon one too, but try not to have to do that one.)
     
  13. tombiasi

    tombiasi Well-Known Member

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    I did read the whole thing from the op. Comments change the tenor of the thread. I am left still wondering why. And I am already out to play.
     
  14. maryloucb

    maryloucb Member

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    Hmmm, I've been trying to figure out how to bring LESS water! Our tank is 35 gallons and we would never need that much water, nor would we want to haul that weight. Camped 3 nights last week and used about 6 gallons of water. (Not including what we filled up in our hydration packs.) I figure the most we will want to bring will be 15 gallons, so I'm thinking we will buy 2 of the 7 gallon aquatainers and use those. Until we get some solar supplementation I don't want to fill the pup's water tank and use the pump for fear of draining the battery. Once we do get some solar I'd like to be able to fill the tank to 15 gallons, so my goal is to figure out how to know when I've reached that level.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2020
  15. tfischer

    tfischer A bad day camping beats a good day at the office

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    Water pump doesn't take much battery. Well it does, when it's running, but it doesn't run very much. No need to worry about it.
     
  16. Dingit

    Dingit Well-Known Member

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    I usually bring solar for the furnace, but haven't needed it for the water pump. I agree--you're probably fine.
     
  17. maryloucb

    maryloucb Member

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    Ok, good to know. I’m kind of paranoid about running the battery down!
     
  18. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    I remember conserving water at home a couple years ago during our big drought. I was reading an RV forum where folks were driving to California from non-drought areas with empty water tanks. They didn't want to waste gas carrying their own water. Instead, they were filling up at State Parks and beaches.

    Another time, I was visiting Mt Diablo state park during the drought. The bathrooms were shut down due to lack of water. The camphost for the season arrived and proceeded to wash his truck and trailer at the campground.

    Please think about where you are going before you decide to fill your water at the destination. And if there is a drought, please don't think your wants outweigh the needs of the residents.

    And yes, you can believe I pointed out those posts to the State Parks and voiced my disapproval that they allowed these things to happen while water was in shortage. Tent campers were being required to bring their own water, but RVers where filling their water tanks to go to another location.
     
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  19. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    I think you meant to write:

    Every three gallons is an extra 25 pounds.

    According to your post, 8.35 lbs/gallon @ 3 gallons = "a pound" (hence the new math comment).

    What you meant, 8.35lbs/gallon @ 3 gallons = 25.05 pounds (more than 24lbs).
     
  20. tombiasi

    tombiasi Well-Known Member

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    I wrote what I meant 1 extra pound over his calculation.
    I really don’t need you to interpret for me.
     

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