Heat strip help

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Repairs & Maintenance' started by mtnkube, Oct 15, 2019.

  1. mtnkube

    mtnkube Member

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    Ok, so does the heat strips in the Carrier Air V heat the air that is drawn in from the inside of the camper? If so would adding an electric space heater give the strips a head start? The strips don't do very well once it gets to about 46°. Thought if I added a surface small space heater so as to not take up to much space it would do even better. 3,2,1 go!
     
  2. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    The heat strip is just to take the chill out of the air and really isnt made as a heater. Use a heater for heat. The small ellecteic ones work great.
     
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  3. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Well-Known Member

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    What's the rating of the heat strip in the carrier air?
     
  4. davido

    davido Active Member

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    I think that you are referring to the heat strip that can be installed into rooftop RV air conditioners. Those often have current draw (and therefore BTU output) well below that of a dedicated electric space heater. And a typical electric space heater is often lower BTU output than an RV furnace. So for heating capability, furnace > space heater > A/C heat strip. Keep that part in mind.

    Additionally, a rooftop air conditioner is installed on the roof top because of the principle of thermodynamic convection; warm air rises, cool air sinks. So putting a cooler on the rooftop it's able to target the hot air up there first before convection carries what's left to lower levels. If the air conditioner were on the floor, your feet would get cold but your head would stay hot.

    Unfortunately this is not the ideal placement for a heating element. Convection is working against a heater mounted at roof level; your head gets hot and your feet stay cold.

    So now put those two problems together: heat strips are lower BTU output than a heater or furnace, and they put their heat in the least productive place; the roof area.

    Given those two marks against heat strips, you can assume they're pretty good at light-duty taking the nip out of the air, and that's about it.
     
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  5. mtnkube

    mtnkube Member

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    Not sure its. We to me
     
  6. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

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    The heat strips run off of 110v.....I believe most use 1500 watts and put out about 5100 btu.
     
  7. tcbrady

    tcbrady Active Member

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    We use the heat strip in our Dometic Duo-Therm AC unit quite often since we do a bit of spring/fall camping. With that said, we noticed the same... Once it hits low 40's and definitely 30's at night it's hard keeping the camper above 60* without running supplemental heat. So we usually set the thermostat on the furnace for low so that kicks on when needed or we'll bring with our small space heater. We don't mind running the furnace though as that definitely seems to be more a dry heat which really helps inside the PUP, plus we run propane for the hot water heater anyways. Having a dual tank and auto swap setup helps too. We never use the contents of both tanks during our camping season which consists of average 14 trips a year.
     

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