Help! Seasoning Cast Iron and running into trouble

Discussion in 'Pots, Pans, Grills, Other Cookware / Cleaning & Fo' started by Keith Hawkins, Jan 9, 2017.

  1. Keith Hawkins

    Keith Hawkins Active Member

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    I have been reading a lot on Cast Iron and realized I made a huge mistake by seasoning my 10" pan with vegetable oil. I washed it with Dawn dish soap and brought it back to a dull look. I then seasoned it with lard twice over the weekend. While wiping the access oil out, i could feel a couple of sticky or tacky area around the edge of the cooking surface where it transitions to the walls of the pan.

    Process for seasoning.
    1. Cleaned pan with dawn dish soap to get rid of old vegetable oil
    2. Dried with paper towel and then placed pan on warm burner to completely dry
    3. Rubbed lard on walls and cooking surface of pan
    4. Placed in over set at 350 for an hour
    5. Wiped access lard out of pan
    6. Let cool and repeated steps 3 through 5.

    Am I doing something wrong, is this normal?
     
  2. silvermickey2002

    silvermickey2002 Morris County, NJ

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    There is nothing wrong with using veggy oil to season cast iron. When I need to redo a pan I will clean it with a SOS pad to get as much off as possible. I will then make sure to rinse it well. While doing this I had the BBQ preheating to about 450-500 degrees. I will place the pan in the BBQ for about 30+ minutes to burn off whats left. When I'm sure everything is burned off I will take it out and let it cool so I can scrub it down with one of those 3M green scrubbing pads. Then will rinse it out with warm water and then return it to the BBQ again for about 15-20 minutes to make sure it is dry. I will then pull it out and give it a coat of Lodge cooking spray (canola oil) and put it back on the BBQ for about 15 minutes. Will recoat and leave it there another 15 minutes. Will do this another 2-3 times. This gives it a nice coating that gets baked on and then I'm good to go.

    The first thing I will cook in it is bacon, want to get some nice seasoning in there!! [:)O]

    When you get those sticky spots it is where the oil dripped down after coating and was thick. I notice that after a few months of not using a pan. I have a few of them and have my favorite one! So the ones not used often do get those sticky spots.
     
  3. Keith Hawkins

    Keith Hawkins Active Member

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    Thanks Silvermickey, reason for re-seasoning of the pan from Vegetable oil was I was getting a lot of black on drying cloths and my hand when cleaning/using the pan. Read on another post that vegetable oil will turn black when the heat gets high and lard would not.

    Glad to hear about the sticky spots, wasn't sure if it was thick spots or possibly the Vegetable oil coming out of the pan and reacting with the lard. Hopefully these will go away over time.
     
  4. BelchFire

    BelchFire I speak fluent vise-grip

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    You need more heat and more time, maybe even less oil, but I can't tell from your description when you wiped out the extra oil. Personally, I'm not as particular about the type of oil as I am the process.

    1) Clean the pan (dutch oven, griddle, whatever) as you choose.
    2) Wipe the pan down with your choice of oil. Some prefer lard or bacon grease; I've used olive oil and canola oil in the past and I'm about to try coconut oil soon.
    3) Place upside down in a cold oven and turn the oven up to 200° for 20-30 minutes.
    4) Remove and wipe down to eliminate ALL excess oil (careful; it's HOT!)
    5) Place it back in the oven upside down and turn the oven up to 450°
    6) Set the timer for 1 hour, then turn the oven off, but leave the pan in until it cools.

    Because this is a thin coat, you'll probably have to do it more than once, but like paint, thin coats are more uniform and adhere better, plus, it just looks great when you get that black glass sheen going in time.

    This has worked for anything I've ever seasoned and with proper care, makes for a beautiful, slick pan, no matter what type of oil you use.
     
  5. Haybale

    Haybale I'd rather be camping!!

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    I had a bugger of a pan that just would not come clean... I ran it through a self cleaning cycle in my oven, it came out gray/white. washed it with dawn dish soap then seasoned with lard and it's been good for a few years now.

    The seasoning is almost plastic like and no longer oil after it is seasoned, so dish soap alone wont clean it off...
     
  6. Keith Hawkins

    Keith Hawkins Active Member

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    Thanks Belchfire, I did not turn the pan upside down so the walls of the pan did not season that well. Guess I will be adding another layer again tonight.
     
  7. BelchFire

    BelchFire I speak fluent vise-grip

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    Turning it upside down is more about allowing the excess oil to drip off the pan (hopefully, you use a tinfoil sheet on the rack below it to catch the drips). You definitely want to wipe up all the excess oil, then allow it to drip if any remains. A thick coating of oil will take much too long to cure out and the same is true for a puddle in the bottom. Multiple thin layers is the golden standard for long-wearing seasoning. [;)]
     
  8. mpking

    mpking Well-Known Member

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    Just a point. If your doing it right, your going to create ALOT of smoke. Make sure you have adequate venting.

    Also, opening the oven door will release a large cloud of smoke, and will most likely set your smoke alarm off.

    Go ahead and ask me how I know.
     
  9. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

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    I was going to bring this up. Even without the smoke, the smell is so overwhelming it gives me a migraine. I have taken to using a charcoal grill.

    I personally use Crisco solid but have read that flaxseed oil does a much better job. It's just really expensive. One day I'll try it.
     
  10. jerry_ma

    jerry_ma Member

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    I use crisco too.

    I season in my gas grill outside.

    Simple to do. I watch the grill and when the smioke goes away i check it (about 45 mins on high)
     
  11. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

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    I wish we had a gas grill! If we did, I would have worked on some I have waiting. The charcoal grill is a pain.

    My son-in-law just bought this expensive grill and it's charcoal/wood/smoker. UGH! They live next door and I was excited because I thought it was gas. Nope. Probably going to have to buy another one ourselves eventually to get a propane one.
     
  12. jerry_ma

    jerry_ma Member

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    I hear ya on the grill prices. I got mine from craigslist. It was originally 900 bux. I got it for 125, with new burners.
     

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