How many still have a cb radio?

supton

Active Member
May 26, 2012
258
I hear you on the language problem. One of the reasons why I run the Cobra 75, I just leave it on my lap and can turn the volume down.

Not a lot of good info on it, especially dead in New England, but it can be nice once Inhead south.
 

scollins

Member
Feb 24, 2013
94
I run CBs on all of my vehicles. I have used them several times to report accidents to the state police that monitor Ch 9. I keep them for two reasons....1st. Many of the areas we drive get no cell reception so having a CB allows a certain level of confidence that I could get help in an emergency. 2nd. They are a blast when caravaning. We have several midlands that are handheld units with remote antennas. With the remote antenna they get about three miles or reception and are a lot of fun. Last road trip we played trivial pursuit over the CBs. One additional one that will not be effective of several years is communicating with my kids. We have a couple sidebands that can reach over 10-20 miles and when my kids are old enough to take my old jeep four wheeling by thenselves, my wife and I can sit at camp with my sideband in my Ramcharger on. If the kids run into trouble we can get to them. My buddy flipped his jeep on its side at an off road park and with CBs we were able to find him and get the shiny side back up.

With regards to the language, I don't use them for traffic info as much as I used to. There's just not enough people out there on them. So, I leave them off unless I need them.
 

R00

Super Active Member
Aug 10, 2014
1,286
It's a requirement if you want to wheel with most offroad clubs.
 

campfire Joe

Active Member
Jan 27, 2015
413
peru new york
I have a cb in each tow vehicle, 1500 sierra p/u and trailblazer. We have to tow our camper, and boat. Having the cbs helps us stay in touch and coordinate stops. Here in NY, cell phones are out lawed while driving.
 

ccarley

Active Member
Sep 23, 2014
254
With the multiple trips I have taken from Nor-Cal to So-Cal, and listening to the CB radio I have in my work truck, I am tempted to leave it out of my new tow vehicle. I do have a hand-held CB just in case I suppose, but I'll probably only be installing my Kenwood dual bander ham rig. I guess on I-5 there are a lot of, uhh, jokers on the CB. I haven't needed to use the radio in an emergency yet, but I did get some info once while on I-5 regarding a rollover.

Clay
 

edh

Super Active Member
Jun 2, 2008
1,072
I still have one from back in the day, though haven't carried it in years. However, even with ubiquitous cell phones I still wish I had the CB now and then, mainly when stuck in a long line of cars and I'm curious about what's holding us up and how long it'll be.

Back when I used the CB, it was nice to be able to hit up a trucker during a backup to find out the lane to be in, and whether it's worth looking for another route. Never used it to chat as some did, was annoyed by those who did so mostly left it off unless I needed info.
 

M-88

Active Member
Jun 29, 2015
164
Nope. Not too much chatter on the CB any more. I do use them in a traffic jam situation ,though. And they have saved me when I heard about upcoming wrecks / traffic jams and was able to duck off the Interstate.

Use mine quite a bit for offroading trips.
 

WeRJuliIan

If it's "Aluminum", why not "Sodum" and "Uranum"?
May 15, 2014
906
Sarasota, FL
I had one waaaay back, in the UK... and we're going to put one in the Jeep for our annual 1400-mile round trip to the Smokies (end of October), partly for traffic and weather, but it might be fun too. (I'm already planning to wind people up with my accent... "Oh yeah, I'm parked up on a mountainside in Scotland with a very big antenna, where are you?" :) )

Not planning to do a full install though, I'm getting a "duplex" Midland. it can be either a battery hand-held or hooked to vehicle power and a "proper" antenna, so it'll be interesting to see how it works out.
 

Mr Buffles

New Member
Nov 10, 2015
5
I used to have them in many of my old vehicles.
Like many have said before, New England doesn't see much CB traffic.
So, I got my Extra Ham License and use a Kenwood 2 meter radio.
I might get one again just for Highway Info and such.
 

You-And-I

Ozarks Überland Basecamp
Jan 3, 2007
861
St. Louis, MO
Re: How many still have a CB radio?

We still have a CB Radio in our Jeep. We use it a-lot, when we go camping in a National Forest areas.
When traveling with friends, so many times when we are out there (Way back in the woods) the phones don't work well.
But, the CB seems to still get out there pretty good!

A few of our friends still have a CB or a HAM in there vehicle for that reason. I think I would like to get a HAM radio sometime, I think more people are on a HAM now days.

CIMG4235-1-1-1-2.jpg
 

Hoosier Daddy

Super Active Member
Jun 24, 2014
1,331
Total noob to this and sorry for the off topic question but...
I see licence plates on vehicles that are a jumble of letters and numbers... Is that their HAM call sign?
 

adrianpglover

Super Active Member
Jul 8, 2014
1,529
Texas
Hoosier Daddy said:
Total noob to this and sorry for the off topic question but...
I see licence plates on vehicles that are a jumble of letters and numbers... Is that their HAM call sign?

If it follows the naming convention for HAM call signs, then yes. They are issued by the FCC. Normally a vanity plate that has someone's HAM call sign on it will say "Radio Operator" on it. If you see one you can look it up here. And yes, you can find mine on there if you know what to search on.
 

dion

Active Member
Apr 26, 2012
639
adrianpglover said:
If it follows the naming convention for HAM call signs, then yes. They are issued by the FCC. Normally a vanity plate that has someone's HAM call sign on it will say "Radio Operator" on it. If you see one you can look it up here. And yes, you can find mine on there if you know what to search on.

Some states identify ham plates with words like "radio operator", but others don't. I have ham plates, but mine don't say anything about radio. My state (California) just puts the call sign on the plate, with no wording or symbols to identify what the call sign means. Cops and ham radio operators recognize them, though.

Ham call signs in the USA follow this convention:

Begin with "K", "W", "N", or "A".

Have one or two letters, followed by one digit, followed by one, two, or three letters.

These days, I always take the HF (shortwave) ham rig camping. It requires a big antenna, so I don't use it while driving, but if I set up the antenna even in the most remote campsite where cell phones don't work, I can always talk to other ham radio operators, hundreds or thousands of miles away.


Oh, and back to the CB subject of this thread. I've got a CB that's been in the closet for a couple of decades. Ham is much more polite (though there are occasional rare bad apples). However, ham radio is much less common, which sometimes makes it less useful. If you're in a traffic jam, you have very slim chances of calling out on the radio and finding another ham who has his radio on and knows what the tie-up is. The nice thing about CB was that you didn't even have to call -- you could just listen to the truck drivers talking about the traffic. But the obnoxious behavior and filthy language makes it not worth the trouble, in my book.
 
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