How to chock a wheel that is on 2x4 leveler?

Discussion in 'Stabilizing Your Camper' started by Kasey Redrum, Nov 7, 2019.

  1. Kasey Redrum

    Kasey Redrum Member

    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2019
    New to all this, but i have the 2005 Rockwood 1640, 12 in wheels. Trying to figure out how to level it. I understand you level side to side first, but if I have to raise one side by driving up on a piece of wood, how do I then put a wheel chock to keep it from rolling off the wood?
     
  2. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,868
    Likes Received:
    860
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    Cut the wood long enough so the chocks can sit on it
     
  3. PopUpSteve

    PopUpSteve Administrator

    Messages:
    18,884
    Likes Received:
    1,624
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2002
    Location:
    Malvern, PA
    Level Side-to-Side first. Best methods are using something like Lynx Levelers or a BAL-Leveler if you camper is light enough. Chock the wheels, disconnect the tow vehicle, and use the tongue jack to level front to back. If your tongue jack has a wheel, get a doughnut chock to drop the wheel into before disconnecting the tow vehicle. Raise the roof and finally put down the stabilizers.

    If you're going to make your own (DWI) levelers, here's something that came up in my Amazon feed yesterday: http://www.hopkinstowingsolutions.com/products/levels/rv-leveling-kit/08200.html
     
  4. bheff

    bheff Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    829
    Likes Received:
    383
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2011
    Location:
    NW Arkansas
    I only chock the side that is on the pavement. (High side). I wont chock the side that is on the leveling block. I also do NOT use the jockey wheel on my jack.
     
  5. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,455
    Likes Received:
    2,277
    Joined:
    May 31, 2018
    Location:
    Nj
    I chock both wheels, just stick a smaller 2x4 or whatever im using under the rear of the chock angling the chock against the wheel. Works great.
     
  6. nineoaks2004

    nineoaks2004 Every meal is a picnic and every Day is a holiday

    Messages:
    7,269
    Likes Received:
    3,017
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2006
    Location:
    Dukes, Fl
    I save 4X4 cut offs and cut them at an angle a 2x4 seems small and the rubber on the tire may not be getting a full support I use 2 x 6 and have them about 3 feet long there is room for the chocks to fit against the tire, I also chock both wheels front and back, they have been known to roll backwards too.
     
  7. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    11,727
    Likes Received:
    835
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2009
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    We have used Lynx Lever blocks with both pups and our small TT. If we need to level, we use the Lynx chock on that side - we drive onto the blocks, so can snug up to the chock nicely. We now use the BAL chock on the other side, it is more secure than the standard plastic type chocks on some surfaces. If we don't need to level side to side, we do use the plastic type on one side, often setting them into place with the rubber mallet.
    You can see the Lynx chocks in this pic from the first trip with the TT - we often use both chocks, just for good measure, driving onto the blocks until we kiss the front chock,then adding the rear one.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Econ

    Econ Active Member

    Messages:
    234
    Likes Received:
    88
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2019
    Location:
    Deep South
    Will respond in a few days. Got metal in eye and cant see well. Will photograph my system. Works on Aliner Expedition.

    If i forget/cant find this thread i hang out in the a frame subforum
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2019
  9. GreyFox

    GreyFox Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,372
    Likes Received:
    633
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2018
    Location:
    S Ontario
    Most would probably suggest plastic or rubber chocks but a better solution that will work sitting on anything - ground, wood, plastic levelers, whatever - is an adjustable BAL Single Tire Chock which won't slip out of position as can plastic chocks. I also used a second one wrapped around the high side tire.

    [​IMG]

    Another alternative is to use a BAL Leveler around the low side tire which will not only level the trailer side-to-side but chock it firmly.

    [​IMG]

    Again, I preferred to use a BAL Single Tire Chock to secure the high side tire and thereby not have to fool around with plastic chocks at all.
     
  10. BillyMc

    BillyMc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,086
    Likes Received:
    491
    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2018
    Location:
    South Carolina
    I didn't at one time, but our last trip that side rolled back dragging the jack through the sand as soon as the tongue cleared the trailer ball. Still had the safety chains attached so it didn't completely roll off the blocks. Now I'll put wedges in front and back of the blocked tire as well.
     
    PopUpSteve and kitphantom like this.
  11. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,455
    Likes Received:
    2,277
    Joined:
    May 31, 2018
    Location:
    Nj
    Chocking both side also helps with the bounce sway inside the camper when walking around. Or in my case an 8 yo jumping around.
     
    PopUpSteve, xxxapache and kitphantom like this.
  12. Wrenchgear

    Wrenchgear Near Elmira, Southern Ontario

    Messages:
    3,244
    Likes Received:
    530
    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Location:
    5 Star Eagle Camper
    Yes, I totally agree.
    I always chock both sides, unless I've had to dig a hole to bring the high side down some. In that case, I usually try to jamb some stones or something in the hole as well, which I guess is like chocking it too. It depends on how long we stay set up in one spot. If its only a weekend, I don't go too crazy, and just kick a couple of good rubber wheel chocks in front of, and behind both wheels. If we stay for longer, (upwards of 3 weeks in one place), then I go a little farther with my chocking. The tires go on boards, (lynx go under board if it's too low), chocks on each side of both wheels, ratchet strap them in to pull them in good and tight, and small woods get put under the chocks because they lift up a little to match the curve of the tire. I can have that set up done in about 15 minutes (or less), but usually leave it for the next day or so, after everything else is done and I have a few minutes to start playing around. No wheel on the tongue jack, and keep it retracted as short as possible by putting it on a big block of wood, and that Pup is rock solid for sleeping at night.

    20170731_165423.jpg

    20170731_165626.jpg
     
    Snow and Sjm9911 like this.
  13. dbhost

    dbhost Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    765
    Likes Received:
    290
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2018
    Location:
    League City, Texas USA.
    I don't. Lumber is for spreading the load of the stabilizer jacks, plastic levelers are for leveling the low side, wheel chocks go on the ground side.

    Those cradle leveler / chocks look pretty promising though.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.