I ditched my stove and I feel so free! Bohemian even!

Discussion in 'My Favorite Mods, Tips, Tricks (and Blunders!)' started by JayGoCamper, Jul 15, 2019.

  1. JayGoCamper

    JayGoCamper Member

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    I don't intend to cook in the pup, so I took out the stove and the cabinet it sits on. Happily for me, the PO added a splitter to the propane line and a regulator for cooking outside on the kind of grills that normally work from a green tank.

    And now I have another storage bin which is more useful than the old matchbox sized double door pedestal cabinet. I covered the hole it left behind with a board, a Mexican blanket, and a tasseled pillow.

    I am surprised at the way having an uninterrupted sight line from one end to the other makes a small box feel spacious. An unexpected big plus is that by removing the useless unit I have opened up 1.5 sq. ft. of packing space.
     
  2. eoleson1

    eoleson1 Well-Known Member

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    I don't think you'll miss it. I've had two pop ups, stretching over almost 30 years and never cooked inside. Now that we moved to a travel trailer, I still cook almost everything outside.
     
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  3. nineoaks2004

    nineoaks2004 Every meal is a picnic and every Day is a holiday

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    I have always left the stove inside in working order, I do not cook on an inside stove unless Mother nature decides that I should use it, being in Fl whether I cook inside or out depends on the weather and it is no fun cooking with the rain etc. coming down.
     
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  4. Lumbergodd

    Lumbergodd Member

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    Welcome to the club!
     
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  5. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    I agree 90% of my cooking is done outside, however weather has dictated where I cook. My luck I get horizontal rain so that signifies indoor cooking for me. So that other 10% is the reason I don’t get rid of my stove inside. Not to mention if a storm is really bad, then the awning is coming down no matter what. I one time had to survive on peanut butter and honey for a week straight because the inside stove quit working and it stormed every single day nothing was dry and I had to put the awning away due to the wind. I never wanted to see peanut butter again for a long long time. I don’t camp with electricity often so no other options. To each their own, but with my luck I don’t risk it.
     
  6. PopUpSteve

    PopUpSteve Administrator

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    Yup, did that in my first PU. The only time I use it in my current PU is to boil water for oatmeal on a cold morning.
     
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  7. silvermickey2002

    silvermickey2002 Morris County, NJ

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    After the first two years of owning the pup we stopped bringing the inside stove. We never used it inside anyway. The pup came with a countertop that replaced the stove unit. The stove now collects dust in the garage loft! We bring one or two Coleman stoves (2-burner) with us depending on the type of trip we are on. We always cooked outside anyway!
     
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  8. JayGoCamper

    JayGoCamper Member

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    Oh, I forget that some of y'all have to deal with real weather. It's gonna be sunny here almost every day from now until January.

    SilverMickey, I have a similar back up plan, involving my single burner stove. I had tucked in into a bin last night, but left the PUP open for one more day, just to make sure I hadn't forgotten anything.

    However, I woke up to a power outage this morning and needed hot coffee desperately. I was sure glad the PUP was still up, and the stove easy to retrieve. I think I won't be keeping it packed away after all!
     
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  9. tzmartin

    tzmartin Well-Known Member

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    We removed ours and haven't regretted it. I redid the countertop and have one big area to clean dishes or prepare food on.
     
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  10. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    This is one of those personal preference issues, where and when you tend to camp can be factors in the decision. When we bought our first pup, we assumed we'd rip out the stove. We were glad we took a few trips first, since we discovered the value of being able to do simple things inside, out of rain, wind-driven rain, or wind. At one point, I had ideas for a picnic table tablecloth with extra strapping, so I could secure some thing when cooking in the wind.
    Being able to choose whether to cook and wash dishes inside or out has made things a lot easier. We do camp in bear country, though don't visit grizzly country very often. We keep a clean camp whether cooking inside or out; with the popups, as with tenting, all cooking and food supplies stayed in the tow vehicle except when actually cooking. In most places, we can leave the camp stove and tables out between meals, but even then we fold the stove down.
     
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  11. Dingit

    Dingit Well-Known Member

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    Hmm. Where we camp, we're lucky if the temperature is up to the 50s when we wake up. Even if we're cooking outside, the coffee is made first, inside!
     
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  12. silvermickey2002

    silvermickey2002 Morris County, NJ

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    This is why I never pack the stoves in the camper! We have had power outages when it's 100 out and no way were we cooking in the house. We setup a kitchen by the pool and had friends over who lost power as well. It was a blast!
    Anyway, if it's that windy and cold the DW and I sleep a little later, take showers and then go out for breakfast! There are times when I woke up and there was some ice in the water jug. At that point you say to yourself, "Am I really gonna cook breakfast when it's 20 out?", "Will the DW appreciate eating a luke warm breakfast on a 20 degree day?" [LOL] Remember, Happy Wife, Happy Life!!!!!
     
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  13. hometownhiker

    hometownhiker Active Member

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    Yep, I pulled my galley and stove top out when I first bought the pup, and have never looked back.
    I have an outdoor kitchen setup, complete with chuck box and camp stove. The setup works great and we love the extra room and openness in the pup.
    If I need to make coffee or heat something up inside, I carry a little butane stove as a backup, but have never felt the need to do that in the last 10+ years of owning this pup.
     
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  14. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    @silvermickey2002 - while we have chosen to go out to eat when it's been cold, rainy, and/or windy, in the places we camp, that's not always an option. We can be an hour or so from the nearest town.
    We now have a few more options for easy meals, with a good fridge and freezer, but we also have a better inside place to cook and eat, in the TT.

    Using the camp stove for home is something I've always known. I can remember my dad cooking on it in the basement, with open windows, during an snowstorm outage when I was about 4. These days. we have a gas stove, so as long as the gas is on, we're good for that. We did,however, sit in the TT during a long outage one evening a couple of years ago. It was much easier to do that than haul out enough lanterns to see in our living room.
     
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  15. silvermickey2002

    silvermickey2002 Morris County, NJ

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    ^At most of the places we camp there is usually something not to far away for breakfast. But for the most part I can count on one hand when we went out for breakfast in the last 10 years. This past November in Amish county, PA it was one of those mornings where it was windy and cold! We brought stuff to make breakfast, but it was just one of those days! We've all been there!!!

    We do have a gas stove in the house, but with 100 degrees outside and no A/C in the house it was best to enjoy the pool that day! Too hot cooking by the stove? take a dip and then go back to cooking!!!
     
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  16. HappyTraveler

    HappyTraveler Well-Known Member

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    Being new to pups with a stove inside, we never had the option to cook inside.
    Now that we have the pup, we're thinking most of the "cooking" inside will be morning coffee, regardless of weather.
    B/c we were tent campers (and this past winter spent 6 weeks tent camping in TX and a few other southern states between NY and TX), we were VERY mindful of the weather. Temperature was the main issue for us this past winter, but rain is always a concern when tent camping. Thinking it will be nice to not have to leave a camp b/c of bad weather (rain/snow).
    Now that it's just the spouse and I, we aren't big eaters, so thinking the only "real" cooking we would do in the camper would be to heat up a can of soup. In the past, we've done mostly salads and sandwiches rather than cook; so thinking that would stay the same if the weather is bad.

    I do think keeping or getting rid of the stove is an individual decision b/c everyone's camping is different. Heck, it can even be different for one family at different times of the year or in life.
    Do what makes you happy and suits your needs!
     

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