I just came across this "You Won't Believe Californians New Rule for RV's & Large Trucks"

JimmyM

Super Active Member
Gold Supporting Member
Jun 5, 2014
3,347
Franklin, MA
The thing is, if your RV is in working order, it'll pass emissions. It's just a giant hassle. Also, who's gonna pay for all that extra bureaucracy? The taxpayers. Well done, California.
 

Dan F

Member
Dec 31, 2020
11
Mont Clare, PA
The thing is, if your RV is in working order, it'll pass emissions. It's just a giant hassle. Also, who's gonna pay for all that extra bureaucracy? The taxpayers. Well done, California.
On one hand, I understand the need to keep emissions low, with the number of cities that deal with smog. On the other hand, it is a significant burden to the owners of the vehicles that will need to pay for the testing themselves... California must have a strong lobby for the emissions testing facilities...
 

Mark CASTELLANI

Active Member
Aug 23, 2019
634
New York State, Erie County
from...https://www.emissions.org/loc/california-emissions-testing/

"The cost of a smog check in California varies based on your vehicle and exactly where you live. You can expect to pay anywhere from $29.95 to $69.95 to get yours done. This fee might not include the $8.25 cost towards your smog certificate. Keep in mind, you have to pay even if your vehicle is exempt."

IDK... I don't live in CA but, I can't help recalling what President Obama said about the Coal industry...

"“So if somebody wants to build a coal-powered plant, they can; it’s just that it will bankrupt them, because they’re going to be charged a huge sum for all that greenhouse gas that’s being emitted,” [Obama said during a 2008 interview with the San Francisco Chronicle’s editorial board.]

same philosophy on RV's? ... emissions testing 4xs per year at $70.00 = an addition to the TCO of $280.00/yr.

Cost for the "Privilege" of Freedom in an RV?

Don't forget the 17 States that are tied to CA's emissions [Trigger Laws]



Happy Trails!
 

Rusty2192

Super Active Member
Jul 30, 2014
1,198
Kentucky
Reading through the actual law, a few important things stood out to me. First, as written it would apply to any “nongasoline” aka Diesel vehicle with a GVWR over 14,000 lbs. Zero-emission and emergency vehicles are explicitly exempted. The other big thing is that it allows for CARB to make other exemptions if the “economic costs of compliance substantially outweigh the benefits”. According to the video the RVIA and campground owners groups pushed hard to get exemptions, so they’ll need to keep pushing.

The law does state that it applies “to the extent authorized by federal law”. So the Interstate Commerce Act may be able to preempt this for out of state rigs and get it tossed. But I’m not a lawyer.

I did catch one thing that the video wasn’t quite right. Most Class Cs and smaller Class As will be fine (for now at least) since they’re usually gas powered.

Oh, one other real head scratcher, at least from the perspective of someone from a non-nanny state. It makes it illegal to drive a heavy-duty vehicle with the check engine light on for any reason.

If I was in a Class C and was just over the 14,000 LBS, I'd be doing whatever I could to get it under weight. Put some aluminum rims on it, change those Lazy-Boy chairs out for something cheaper and lighter, get rid of a propane tank, whatever it takes, get it under weight.
It goes by GVWR over 14,000 lbs, so it would need to be officially derated to avoid the law. I see a future optional 13,999 GVWR package coming soon to dealer lots. They already have one on 3/4 ton trucks to derate them to under 10,000 lbs on paper for registration purposes.
 
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Lug_Nut

Active Member
May 29, 2016
347
Mt. Wachusett area, MA
The sky is falling! The sky is falling!

"Unlike passenger car smog checks, heavy-duty vehicle owners will be able to complete the required test and deliver emissions systems inspection information remotely without having to travel to designated testing locations. The test can be conducted anywhere using the truck’s OBD system or stand-alone scan tool provided it’s performed by a CARB-credentialed tester using a CARB-certified readout device. It is projected that 75 to 80% of all heavy-duty trucks will have OBD equipment that can utilize telematics technology – that is, sending the data automatically – when the program begins."


Note that the link above is the same document used in the Youseless tube video in post 1.
 

teh603

Member
Dec 28, 2020
79
Coastal Texas
Reading through the actual law, a few important things stood out to me. First, as written it would apply to any “nongasoline” aka Diesel vehicle with a GVWR over 14,000 lbs.
Honestly, sounds more like someone's going after the raised diesel pickup trucks that're such a pain here in Texas.
 

Rusty2192

Super Active Member
Jul 30, 2014
1,198
Kentucky
Honestly, sounds more like someone's going after the raised diesel pickup trucks that're such a pain here in Texas.
Nah, pickups are well under 14,000 lbs GVWR. F-450 is right at 14k, so still not covered. It’s aimed primarily at commercial trucks like delivery trucks, semis, dump trucks, etc. Think of all of those that you see blowing smoke. Which is why it’s even more perplexing to include personal motorhomes.
 




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