Include tongue weight in tire rating?

Discussion in 'Tires / Brakes / Bearings / Axles' started by RhythmScience, May 27, 2021.

  1. RhythmScience

    RhythmScience Member

    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    32
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2020
    Location:
    Hagerstown, MD USA
    I'm looking for advice as to whether I should replace the tires that came with my pup...

    I got my NTU Palomino Y-series 4127 last August and it had the correct size tires (ST175/80R13) made in 2018, but they're C load range and the sticker on the side of the pup says to use load range D tires. According to the CAT scale, the pup is 2,900 lbs fully loaded, but the tires are only rated to carry 1,360 lbs. each (2,720 lbs total). However, the tongue weight is around 380 lbs, so the tires are actually only carrying 2,900 - 380 = 2,520 lbs. When determining whether I'm overloading the tires, should I go by the total pup weight, or the weight minus what's on the tongue (that is, only what the tires are carrying)? I hate to replace tires that are in good shape, and we've made several trips with no problems (yet). What do y'all think? Are we operating too close to the weight limit for those tires?
     
  2. Raycfe

    Raycfe Waterford Ct.

    Messages:
    17,819
    Likes Received:
    3,300
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2007
    Location:
    Waterford, Ct
    Load range d for sure. Having a blow out on the road is no fun
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2021
    Arlyn Aronson and xxxapache like this.
  3. eoleson1

    eoleson1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,613
    Likes Received:
    1,732
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Location:
    Macomb County Michigan
    The tires are only supporting the weight of the trailer minus the tongue, so you are under the limit. You should check the date code on the tires though to see how old they are. Tire manufacturers recommend you replace the tires if they are more than five years old regardless of how they look.
     
    kcsa75 likes this.
  4. Anthony Hitchings

    Anthony Hitchings Well-Known Member Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    3,188
    Likes Received:
    1,895
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2019
    Location:
    Oakland, California
    LRD - if you get in an accident due to a blowout and there are damages to a 3rd party, especially personal injury, your non-compliance with manufacturer's reqt is another basis for fault
     
    xxxapache likes this.
  5. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    11,817
    Likes Received:
    2,394
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2007
    Location:
    Ontario
    Use the trailer GVWR to buy tires..

    Right now you are marginal at best.. but add one or two extra items, take food for 1 extra day, or change one small thing and you are over what your tires can handle.. that and as mentioned, if something happens and accident investigators look at your tires, they will go off the gvwr ..
     
    Sjm9911 and xxxapache like this.
  6. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,790
    Likes Received:
    8,170
    Joined:
    May 31, 2018
    Location:
    Nj
    Your calculations are correct. But if you loose a little air on the road , the weight rating on the tire will go down. Its too close for my liking. I would get load d tires and thank god i didnt have a blowput yet. But thats just me.
     
    Arlyn Aronson and xxxapache like this.
  7. tombiasi

    tombiasi Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,675
    Likes Received:
    2,240
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2012
    Location:
    Northwestern New Jersey
    The tongue weight will vary a little as you go up and down hills. Manual specs LRD use LRD.
     
    Sjm9911 likes this.
  8. RhythmScience

    RhythmScience Member

    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    32
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2020
    Location:
    Hagerstown, MD USA
    Many thanks for the great advice. Given variance due to inflation & hills, plus our next trip is to Delaware and will mean crossing the bay bridge--the absolute last place I'd like to have a flat tire--I think I'll go ahead and upgrade to the D tires.
     
  9. TSQ

    TSQ Active Member

    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    49
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2021
    Location:
    Niagara Region, ON
    In addition to all the previous responses, keep in mind that it is unlikely your trailer will be perfectly balanced from side to side and so one tire will be carrying more than half the weight. Especially when cornering.
     
    tombiasi likes this.
  10. RhythmScience

    RhythmScience Member

    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    32
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2020
    Location:
    Hagerstown, MD USA
    Good point. On my last trip, the curb side tire got warmer than the road side tire--maybe that's why.
     
  11. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Un-Supported Member

    Messages:
    6,569
    Likes Received:
    3,461
    Joined:
    May 23, 2018
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Tires also have to be strong enough for- bridge transitions on the interstate, speed bumps, pot holes, dropping off curbs, parking lot to road transitions, road construction surface changes, road debris, washboard dirt roads, ruts and roots, kids toys, armadillos, etc. Is there a load range E?
     
  12. Clemens

    Clemens Member

    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    20
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2019
    Location:
    FL - Florida
    Definitely go with a D rating. That will last you a long time. You also should stay compliant with the manufacturers reccomendations.
     
  13. RhythmScience

    RhythmScience Member

    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    32
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2020
    Location:
    Hagerstown, MD USA
    My Kenda Karrier load range D tires just arrived today from eTrailer.com. I could've gotten them cheaper from Amazon, but people there were commenting that they were getting years-old tires. The ones I got from eTrailer were made last May. I'll get a local shop to put 'em on the wheels and I'll be good to go!
     
    Sjm9911 likes this.

Share This Page