Inside of Tire Tread was Gone

Discussion in 'Tires / Brakes / Bearings / Axles' started by tork65, Jul 14, 2017.

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  1. tork65

    tork65 Member

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    So I just returned from a 6412 mile trip from NC to Yellowstone to Grand Canyon and back. About half way I was checking the tire pressure and doing an inspection over everything and I noticed that the inside of the tire tread was gone, no tread left. I assumed from the beginning I was over weight as I only had so much room in the back of my pickup and the camper I have (2006 Fleetwood Niagara) only allows for about 280 pounds or so loaded in the camper. I had two coolers each weighing about 80 pounds, food, charcoal... and so on, I have no idea what I weighed, but I knew I was over. I ended up getting new tires (it was time anyway) and made the trip without incident. Anyway, is there any solutions for getting the allowable weight in the pup increased for supplies? Do I have to do an axel swap? Can I just up grade to a heavy duty tires? Any suggestions would be a great help. Thanks.
     
  2. sierrapup

    sierrapup Active Member

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    possible helper springs..??? [CC]
     
  3. tork65

    tork65 Member

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    Yeah, thats not a bad idea. I had not considered that.
     
  4. f5moab

    f5moab Retired from the Federal Government

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    Adding different springs will not allow more load just like in a truck it will keep it from lowering from the added weight (the springs connect to the axle). The weight of the trailer is still going to be held by the axles, tires and the tongue weight, and most likely the type of frame (C-channel or full), and flooring.
    So I guess changing the axle and tires might help, but would the flooring/frame hold the extra weight
     
  5. mstrbill

    mstrbill Active Member

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    then you need go weigh it and find out how much you are over your GVWR. Your CCC is 610lbs, but you have to subtract propane, battery, awning and AC from that.

    You will have do more than change the axle; change the springs, and probably the spring hangers. And maybe go to an overslung axle to allow bigger tires.

    Some how Fleetwood increased the CCC to 810lbs for my 2008 Niagara.
     
  6. tork65

    tork65 Member

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    Yeah I knew I would need to weigh it in order to find out I was over, but it wouldn't of mattered. The TV was full and I had things I still needed to pack, so I just went for it.
     
  7. Adam H

    Adam H Active Member

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    There is a thread here where someone did an axle upgrade on his Niagara and he did a really good job! Might be with the read as the Niagaras at at it near their max axle weights when empty.

    Adam
     
  8. arthuruscg

    arthuruscg Active Member

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    You will need to swap the axle, springs and tires to increase the carrying capacity. Coleman's use boxed frames/
     
  9. 1380ken

    1380ken Well-Known Member

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    Are you saying that driving 3000 miles with the trailer overloaded wore the inside tire tread off? Were the tires good at the beginning? Did the new tires also loose the inside tread on the other 3000 miles of overloaded driving?
     
  10. Halford

    Halford Well-Known Member

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    Carry stuff that you WILL use, leave those at home that you WILL NOT use.
     
  11. etrailerJohn

    etrailerJohn Member

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    There's more than one possible cause of the wear you describe. Overloading the trailer will indeed do it, but also if an axle 'flip' has been done incorrectly, it can also cause the wear you're describing. 'Flip' is kind of a misnomer. What you're doing is relocating the suspension from below the axle to above it. The axle isn't flipped around side to side, because doing so would cause the arch intentionally manufactured into the axle to become a dip.

    Keep in mind that upgrading the axles, suspension and tires/wheels won't necessarily increase the camper's weight bearing capacity. You'll still be limited by the GVWR of the trailer.

    You can see more information by clicking the link below:

    https://www.etrailer.com/expert-120.html
     

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