Is an electric hook up worth it? Small electric appliances?

Discussion in 'First Time & New Camper Owners' started by jasba, Mar 7, 2016.

  1. Kettlebelle

    Kettlebelle Member

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    We fill the fresh water holding tank on our way into the campground. Lasts a weekend no problem, longer than that we refill it with a tote 6 gallons at a time.
     
  2. tcanthonyii

    tcanthonyii Member

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    If we are going to a camp ground we pretty much always plug into electric. I prefer to sleep better at night so it runs the ac or heater. We do not have a propane heater in our camper. Wish it did though. My wife is a coffee snob and hates it out of a percolator so she bought a small coffee pot. Otherwise we camp quite often in a pasture and we don't do any power there. I do fire up the generator from time to time for coffee. (No joke).

    Personally I could go either way. I prefer to use appliances without power camping. Gas/propane/mechanical is my preference. I sleep ok with a battery operated fan. I still tent camp as well. It's the rest of my family that doesn't care for that as much.

    Oh and no microwaves in my popup. Not needed for camping.
     
  3. 1380ken

    1380ken Well-Known Member

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    I like having a microwave when camping. I like my coffee really hot so I am always reheating it. Microwave is also good for popcorn and nachos. We also usually go out to eat a couple of times during the camping trip and the microwave is good for heating leftovers. I tent camped for 30 years so I don't mind enjoying any and all conveniences while camping. I have done my roughing it.
     
  4. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

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    No, not worth it unless you need AC. It is nice in the winter to run electric heaters and run the water heater fridge off electric. In the winter on sites without electric we use about 20 amps a day for the furnace and lights and about 20 lbs of propane ever 4 days. We use solar to recharge the battery.

    But in the spring and fall battery works great and yes we charge the phone an kindle off the campers battery.
     
  5. dougfam

    dougfam Member

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    We enjoy our hookup's especially electrical. When we got out camper 2 years ago, we used the propane stove and grill to do all our cooking, even making coffee in a classic stove top peculator. However, we now have a cheap electric coffee maker that we use and even a cheap toaster oven we bring with us. It really makes it a more enjoyable for us. We use the toaster oven to make warm cookies, muffins in the morning, biscuits, etc... I'm sure I will catch some flack for it, but to each their own.
     
  6. durhamcamper

    durhamcamper Active Member

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    We used to tent camp as most others have. Once we got our pup we changed the way we do things.
    We now use a toaster and a coffee maker. We purchased an electric mattress cover that is great in the cooler nights. I charge my electric razor. One thing we never do without is our electric cooler which greatly reduces the amount of ice needed.
    Could we do without this stuff? Sure we could, but we like our conveniences.
     
  7. silvermickey2002

    silvermickey2002 Morris County, NJ Gold Supporting Member

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    Funny, the DW and I were just talking about this while having breakfast this morning! She prefers full hookups, but she did say she would rather have water hook ups if anything and could do without electric hook ups. The only thing we really need for electric is our rope lights for our canopy and charging our cameras and phones. When we don't have electric we use our Coleman lantern (duel fuel). I have a solar charger for our phones if we need it. As for the camera batteries, we have 3 for my wifes camera and they will last all week. As for mine, it can also be charged via the solar charger.

    If we are traveling to a hot and humid area, then we MUST have electric for the A/C...There is no argument about it. We want our A/C so we can sleep in comfort! [:D]
     
  8. Papasmurf40

    Papasmurf40 2008 Ford F150 and 1998 Coleman Sunridge

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    DW and I camp at electric sites at mostly provincial parks. Even when we tent camped. DW is a tea tottler and i just have the Maxwell house but we use a kettle. We also use a small plug in bar fridge to suplement our 3 way fridge and a couple coolers for the pop and such. Also a electric toaster is sometimes used and skillet and the radio.

    !998 Coleman SunRidge and 2008 F150
     
  9. edh

    edh Active Member

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    Depends a lot on the circumstances. If I am close enough to town to get a meal, it's not raining the whole time, and I'm neither sweating or freezing to death at night, I don't really need electricity.
    On the other hand, to it's nice to be able to power a TV in the evenings, though I can go without a day or two.
    Bad weather means more time in the camper so more diversions are helpful, though if I'm not too far with a town that has a library, movies, a good bar or restaurant, those become the diversions and again I don't really need anything that the battery won't run for a day or two (lights, fans). The tow vehicle charges the phones and such.
     
  10. world traveler

    world traveler Active Member

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    prefer electric for early spring or late fall - use my el.heater at night since it's more quiet, and enjoy my el. blanket :) If we have electric, I take my 7in1 instant pot and el. kettle with me. I cook breakfast and lunch outside in electric cooker mostly since it's multi-functional, and we cook dinner over the fire. Keep it simple.
     
  11. gardenbliss

    gardenbliss Well-Known Member

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    I prefer non hookup sites, because then I'm farther away from the big RV's and it is often quieter and in a more forested area. I only camp 2-3 nights at a time so my battery provides all that I need, and I fill my water tank from the community spigot. I use a French press for coffee and my camp stove or the fire for cooking.
     
  12. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah Gold Supporting Member

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    My last pup was an old barebones jayco. Didn't even have a battery hookup. I did more dry camping with it using lanterns etc for light. During the fall or the intence heat of summer were the only times I found an electrical site to run fans or heater. Well unless I had my sidekick with me who is a glamper. Now that my new to me trailer has AC and furnace I may finally be able to take my mother camping (something she loves) which means electrical sites only. She has a bit of a medical condition regulating body temp so AC is a requirement. When I don't have my family with me I would still choose dry camping sites. Like others mentioned it's quieter, closer to nature.
     
  13. terry1419

    terry1419 Active Member

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    As Bondebond said, it's really a personal choice and many others have said that it depends on the season as well as other reasons. Why not just try both ways and see which you prefer. I think you'll find that you will choose either way based upon the weather and other many factors. If your only consideration is money, just stay home, sell the camper and save the entire camping fee, gas cost, etc.
     
  14. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member Platinum Supporting Member

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    This is not one of those all one way or the other decisions, particularly if you already own the small appliances. At least at first, you can experiment on some trips and see if you like having the appliances on trips and if they are worth the space and any extra camping fees.
    Choosing what is taken on each trip allows us to tailor all sorts of equipment to the type of trip (traveling, camping or some combination), weather, current needs, etc. With both of our pups being so small, there wasn't any space to store small appliances if they were not gong to be used on any given trip (some of them traveled in the TV until we were set up, especially with the 6' pup). The microwave was already installed in the TT when we bought it; we use it for storage in camp if we don't have power.
     
  15. dougdrees

    dougdrees New Member

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    I'll put in my $.02. We live in Colorado and most Forest Service campgrounds do not have electricity. For those that do, the electric sites are usually more exposed because they are most often used by RVs or big trailers. So, we rarely use an electric site. There have been some comments about water hookups, but I have never seen one in a non-private campground in CO. There are electric sites to non-electric sites.

    As a result, I can take it or leave it. We cook with propane, we heat with propane, we refrigerate with propane, and all else is on the battery. For week long trips, I bring a second battery and change it out mid week. But we can make it 3-4 days on one battery.

    One thing I discovered, though, is that some people need a CPAP machine for apnea. A friend of ours deals with this and he drains a battery in a night with it. So, if that is your lot, then I think a generator or electric hookups would be essential.
     
  16. davido

    davido Well-Known Member

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    You can keep your phones charged, run the fan a couple hours during the daytime, and the furnace a little in the evenings and morning, and last for a few days at that rate with a Group 27 battery. If you prefer to keep the pup warm inside all night you would probably want a little space heater, and for that, hookups. I have air conditioning that also requires hookups. But in mild weather, neither the heat nor the AC are all that important, and battery power is fine.
     
  17. f5moab

    f5moab Retired from the Federal Government

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    I can camp easily for four days with cold nights dropping down into the 20s in the mountains with no electric hookups. Except for the LED lights, the phone charger, the tablet charger and the furnace fan all is on propane. And I will run the furnace quite a bit at night if the temps drop into the 20s. However, I'm running two BCI27 true deep cycle batteries. If I'm headed out for more than four nights in really cold weather I bring along a Honda 2000 gen and a small battery charger to recharge the batteries. And if the weather is mild, with nighttime temps in the 40s, I can easily go more days without charging.

    However, a lot of the FS campgrounds in WY that I have camped at do offer some electrical hookup sites. And some will have electrical hookups at sites that are designed (NOT DESIGNATED) as handicapped sites.
     
  18. yetavon

    yetavon everything is better around a campfire.

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    Being you have a lot of experience tent camping then its just a matter of adapting to your tent being on a trailer. If all your needing power for is to run something you have been able to do without with for years then why bother, put the $20 toward a 3rd night...and save another $10 [LOL]
    But it also gives you the option of extending your camping season by adding electric heat, or blankets during cooler times, bigger fan for hot...or a window AC unit stuck under a corner [:O]
    Until several years ago all our camping was off grid, we still do some backwoods tenting, but also enjoy getting away to many of the State Parks, and they are mostly all power around here.
     
  19. PointyCamper

    PointyCamper Active Member

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    We can use electric or not, but in a lot of campgrounds I have found the pet friendly sites are electric only so even if we dont want electric we have to pay for it.
    The only time we prefer it is A/C season but the fantastic fan really is so sometimes I'd rather save the $$$
     
  20. sawdusty

    sawdusty San Antonio

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    Welcome from San Antonio! It's a little confusing at first with the converter, 12 V, and 120 V. It would help us help you if you tell us what PUP you have and what appliances are already in it and what you may add now or later. We need to know what batteries you have: what size, how many, and is it holding a charge. How will you keep the batteries charged?
     

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