Is Furnace worth it?

Discussion in 'Camper Pre-Purchase Questions' started by jk70, Sep 10, 2014.

  1. smw526

    smw526 Member

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    Absolutely! Just ask my DW :)
     
  2. ricko

    ricko Member

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    Yes, they are worth it! My two best examples are an early fall trip to the mountains when the weather turned well below freezing and our Yellowstone trip in JULY when the night time temps were below freezing every night. The little electric heaters didn't hold up, but the furnace kept us cozy.

    My DW won't go out in the fall without it.

    Ricko
     
  3. zorak

    zorak Member

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    I am glad mine has a furnace. My last camper only had a heat strip in the ac unit and there ain't no way that would have worked for us ( well the DW anyway)! Now we have a trip planned for october and thanksgiving. A happy wife makes for a good time camping!
     
  4. mnebinger

    mnebinger Livin' The Dream!

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    Our pup only had a heat strip in the AC unit. It would try to maintain the temp but never really did a good job. We ended up using one or two space heaters. Our new HTT has a furnace. I can't wait to try it out.

    I don't know if I would have said it was a must have, as we always have at least electric hookups, if not electric and water. The space heaters did a good job, but we haven't been camping past the first weekend of November.
     
  5. Heritage

    Heritage New Member

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    Don't have a furnace. Wish I did.
     
  6. tconroy

    tconroy Active Member

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    Tomorrow Im pulling the pup out of the garage to replace a lift post and then I will fire up the furnace for the first time just to see if it works. My wifr says a space heater is good enough but if I can squeeze in a couple of more trips than the heater will be worth it. We are suppose to have record lows tonight so it will be a good test.
     
  7. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

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    If you don't have a furnace and will camp where the is not elec on cold nights. I would not buy a furnace. I would buy a propane space heater or wave catalytic heater.

    I have a furnace but also have a wave propane heater, in addition to elec space heaters. But I would not buy a camper without a furnace. It just so nice to run the furnace on a cold damp night when it's only going to run a few times an hour. You don't have to dig out and mess with the space heaters. It's so nice to have the furnace kick on in the 30's when the space heaters can not keep up.
     
  8. novagirl

    novagirl retired camper

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    If I were ever to buy another pup, it would have a furnace. Our Starcraft had one that would roast you out! So nice to take the dampness out too.

    Sent from my KFTHWI using Tapatalk HD
     
  9. jk70

    jk70 Member

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    I do appreciate all the responses but I'm not looking for what people think who camp in the Northern states. That's a given to me. It's more directed towards the southerners, which a few have answered.

    Either way, it looks like the majority think it's a good idea.
     
  10. davido

    davido Active Member

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    I had a sailboat at the San Juan Islands in northern Washington, and used its kerosene heater often. Later, moved to Los Angeles. ...still used it. Not as frequently, but it was still useful on those cool nights.

    The coast near LA is probably cooler at night than camping in the southern states. But look at the heater as a way of extending your season.
     
  11. F239141

    F239141 New Member

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    Depends on the weather, I have been in Panama City during December and it be 30 at night. Same in
    Orlando, and back home near Mobile Alabama.

    In the MH (36') I used a baseboard heater in the living room area and a space heater in the kitchen blowing towards the bathroom bedroom, then set the furnace to a real low temp. The heat strips in the roof airs never have done much but take the chill out, so never use them.

    It was easier in the MH since it was 50amp service, and also having a 7500 gen set.

    I will still use electric heat in the PUP, with the furnace set real low when hooked to power. But dry camping will use the furnace
     
  12. dwright8

    dwright8 New Member

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    I'm in NC and have the same camping profile as you .. mainly in state. Mine came with a furnace standard and I'm pretty sure that we'll be using it in the cooler months...at least to take the chill out of the air if nothing else. If it were an option, I would have likely had it installed.
     
  13. TNScott

    TNScott New Member

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    I have used propane heaters in our tents and hunting pups for MANY years with no problems whatsoever. A little bit of ventilation is easily achieved in either.
    I plan on using the furnace in our NTU pup this fall also. Cant wait to see how well it works in the pup.
    That being said, i'll still use our ceramic heaters when we have AC at our site...
     
  14. mcbrew

    mcbrew Member

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    I carry a small 1,500 watt cube heater in my pup, which also has a furnace. We almost always camp with hookups, so I will run the electric heater when possible. Something to keep in mind, though, is that a 1,500 watt heater puts out 5,100 BTUs. The standard pup furnace is 20,000 BTUs. So, a pup furnace is almost four times as powerful as a 1,500 watt heater, which is about as powerful as a plug-in heater gets.

    You may not need it very often, but you will probably have times that you'll regret it if you don't get the furnace. My last camper did not have a furnace. On one trip, we had the electric heater AND a Buddy heater running at the same time and we were still cold. This was during the winter near Gettysburg, PA. If we had a 20,000 BTUS furnace, we would have been very comfortable.

    Our pup also had heated mattresses, which really helps to keep the chills out.
     
  15. DragNfly

    DragNfly New Member

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    We live in South Texas and have used our wall mounted electric heater on several occasions.

    During a bathroom remodel, I salvaged a 1950's Broan 110v / 220v wall mounted heater. It has a self regulating on/off thermostat and variable temperature setting.

    I wired it to the same circuit as the AC since we would never use both at the same time. It easily keeps the PUP toasty warm.

    You can still buy these today. Click http://www.broan.com/products/product-line/heaters
     
  16. kf4ocv

    kf4ocv New Member

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    I would just pick up a cheap portable electric heater from Lowes or Home Depot from my experience this will do the job and is much cheaper.
     
  17. Nandy

    Nandy Active Member

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    I have a furnace and electric ceramic heaters. All my camping is in the SE (Tn, VA, GA, FL, NC and SC) and I have used heat in all of those states so i will think if you and your family like the same level of comfort then you will want some sort of heat in your camper. Now you need to decide which form depending on what style camping you do.

    The ceramic heaters are very safe. I have used them in my large camper (Dutchmen) in 20 degrees weather in Cherokee and they kept of toasty. I had a large (the ones that looks like a wood stove) one set for the 1500w and a smaller one set for 750w. We had no need for sleeping bags. I like to have the larger heater on its own 14 ga drop cord and keep the one set up for 750 powered thru the pup 30amp cable. Since campground dont charge extra per power consumption it wont cost you any more. This would be my preferred method of heating although is not quick to heat the entire pop but given it time it does nicely and quietly.

    The propane furnace I have has also been tested to 20 degress and have worked great. The furnace is used when boondocking since it will use propane to heat which is not in the campground fee and I have to keep the battery charged which requires me to fire the generator during the hours that it is allowed. Solar system might come next year and might help. The furnace does make some noise, the sound of the gas burner plus the fan might be an issue for some, not for me or my son.

    Ether way, I wont be caught without a way to heat up the camper nowadays. I did my share of camping with ice forming on/in my tent and while the sleeping bags did their job, getting in my otherwise frozen cold clothes and freezing tent were not fun. Later on I did got some Heather Buddy but they require you to have a way to vent the co2 so I mostly used then only to get the tent comfortable before getting out of the sleeping bags.
     
  18. Byrd_Huntr

    Byrd_Huntr Well-Known Member

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    That happened to us. Woke up at dawn in a northern MN park to find the ground crusted in frost, and the campground power out.

    We have a furnace in our camper, but also a small forced air portable heater. We use that most of the time. In mid-late October, it can get down into the 20's, and we use both heaters to keep the big one from running as much.


    Regarding the OP question...It's not just the temps that you have to consider. You can get really cold and clammy at 50 degrees if camping in foggy or dewy bottomlands.
     
  19. bardenl

    bardenl New Member

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    Here's a vote the other way. We camped in Yellowstone (no electricity) this summer for 10 days and two nights it got down to 39F. We used a Mr. Buddy propane catalytic heater that uses a propane canister. It warmed up the space nicely. We store it under a seat along with fans and 2 little ceramic electric heaters. The Mr Heater Buddy is quiet. We use our main propane for the refrigerator and cooktop and wouldn't want to run out.

    A furnace adds weight, occupies what would be a storage cabinet, is noisy, and its fan runs down your battery. I also carry a down comforter. On cold nights I lay it against the bunkend where it blocks the cold and is handy if we want to spread it on top of our sleeping bags. We go to Florida in the winter and camp on the beach at Bahia Honda without electricity. We got the Mr Buddy after a couple of very cold nights in 2006 off the grid at Grand Gulf Park in Port Gibson, Mississippi, but never needed it until Yellowstone. A few times we've used 2 of the little electric heaters to keep warm when camping in the Rockies or up in Canada in the summer.
     

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