Keep faucets and drain open or closed and completely filled with antifreeze?

Discussion in 'Camper Storage / Winterizing & De-Winterizing' started by Remstarcan, Sep 19, 2021.

  1. generok

    generok Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    For me, it's a simple, simple rule. If there is a confined space in my water system that ice would form and have no place to expand to, it gets filled with antifreeze that stays there with the valves shut.

    Once antifreeze is run through all the nooks and crannies, it's going to be good to go. I think the lowest temp my TT experienced last winter was -22F, so it seems to work.
     
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  2. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Un-Supported Member

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    I turn the water pump valve to suction. I open the cold low point drain. I blow air through the suction line while running the pump about 5/10 seconds.
     
  3. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    That probably isnt a good idea, you cavitate the pump. You have a chance to damage the impeller. And you will not get all the water out. Maybe more then not doing it. But it will effect the pump long term. But you also live in an area where it isn't super cold for a long time. Water needs time to freeze. Even inside the pup its semi insulated. So you need below freezing temps, for like 3 days straight.
     
  4. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Un-Supported Member

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    Look at the specs on RV water pumps. They are not impeller, but diaphragm types. They are not damaged by running dry. If you get most of the water out, the rest has room to expand.
     
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  5. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    Ok, so you can run it dry. You still cant blow it out. To do that you would need a greater air pressure then was created by the pump. If you did that you would close off the backflow valve? If you use the low point drain, its not at the beggining of the pump so you would trap water in the pump. The air would follow your drain line out trapping water in the system. Unless you added a valve at the beggining of the pump. But then you would still need to bypass the backflow. I dont see any way possable that it would work. You will get water out , but not all of it. Thats why people loose there pumps when they blow out there lines. Not always but it happens.it traps water in the lines. If you use antifreeze it dosen't happen. Now many people, that dont have a lot of cold weather might have more success with it. But if you live up north , use the antifreeze.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2021
  6. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    Edited out to not confuse.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2021
  7. theseus

    theseus Living the Darkside... Silver Supporting Member

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    You have to run antifreeze through the pump. You can't blow that out. Fill the lines with antifreeze first, then blow out the lines.

    And just another word advice. Use non-alcohol based antifreeze. It took me a long time to get the taste of the antifreeze out of my tank and lines after I used that one year. Propylene glycol rv antifreeze is the way to go. Propylene glycol is non-toxic and tasteless. Just don't confuse it with ethylene glycol or car antifreeze.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2021
  8. 3fortheroad

    3fortheroad New Member

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    Where is the access to your water pump?
     
  9. gladecreekwy

    gladecreekwy Well-Known Member

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    My pup does not have a pump. My TT water pump is under the bed, but it depends on the model.
     
  10. kcsa75

    kcsa75 Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    In our area now is a good time to buy RV anti-freeze. Our local Ace Hardware had it on sale two gallons for $7.
     
  11. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Un-Supported Member

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    In post #22 it is stated to open the cold low point drain. System pressure goes to 0 psi. At 0 zero psi, the feedback to the pressure regulator is 0 psi and regulator valve is wide open to allow any fluid or air through. A regulator set at 45 psi, will allow air or water through at 20 psi, if the feed back signal is 0 psi. So blowing 25 psi air, through the pump suction line, while running the pump until dry for 10 seconds, pushes the water out the low point drain.
     
  12. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    Not everyones low point drain is in the same space. It would need to blow through the pump back into the water holding tank. I have no idea of what running a pump dry can push forward as far as pressure goes. Your saying that the backflow valve will not close at 25 psi of air pressure from 0. Im not so sure of that. Depends on the valve in play i guess. Some put clapper valves in line after theres fails. So its a one way valve. I cant see you pushing water out from a dead end. I hear what your saying i just dont see it happining. As i said, you can do it down by you in South Carolina, where its colder up north I'll use antifreeze.
     
  13. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Un-Supported Member

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    Most low point drains are outside the camper. You have to blow air in the natural direction of the water flow. From the antifreeze suction line, water pump inlet, through water pump (running for the reed valves or what ever it uses for valves to work), pressure regulator, check valve, and out the low point drain. Air should not flow back to the fresh water tank, due to the check valve in or in front of the pump. The check valve, what you may be calling a backflow valve, should close when any air or water flow is moving toward the pump.
     
  14. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    Correct, but most older campers dont have the antifreeze line to open up and drain it with air. Thus, the water gets trapped in that spot or in the pump. Its a dead end. Since the check valve prevents the water from leaving it just presurises it. Unless you keep cycling the pump and air every so often , but even then you will not know if all the water is out. And that seems like a pita. And a check valve is similer enough to a backflow preventer. A backflow preventer is usally a bit more complex and includes a check valve. Same idea, just a bit diffrent application i guess.
     

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