Lets Talk Tires...

Discussion in 'A-Frame PopUps' started by Bartolino, Aug 15, 2020.

Have you ever had to change a trailer tire on the road?

Poll closed Aug 27, 2020.
  1. Yes

    19 vote(s)
    48.7%
  2. Nope, and hope I never have to

    20 vote(s)
    51.3%
  1. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

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    Look into a trailer TPMS if your budget allows. If you have one, you may be alerted to a blowout quicker, get pulled over faster, and eliminate or at less lessen the damage done to your trailer.
     
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  2. vagov

    vagov Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    x2 what he said!!!!
     
  3. Sws763

    Sws763 New Member

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    My wife and I bought an 05 hybrid travel trailer last year, and the first thing I noticed were how nice the tires looked. Until I started reading post as to how often tires should be changed. That made me really look at the tires on the trailer. I started with the date codes. 3 of them were from late 2003 and the other 2 were from early 2004. That made me think these are the original tires. Bias ply to boot. I decided I would replace all 5 tires for this season. Believe it or not, WalMart had some of the best prices for Carlisle radial trailer tires. Unfortunately, due to the pandemic, all the WalMart service centers were closed. I could still get the tires there and have them mounted elseware but I went through Amazon for just a bit less plus free shipping. The money saved I had them mounted from a local garage. The old tires really looked great, but you can't always go by looks.
     
  4. poppy65

    poppy65 Member

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    [MyQUOTE="Bartolino, post: 1365025, member: 118327"]Greetings Aliner Peeps,

    In preparation for my upcoming Yellowstone NP trip, I'm starting to think about my tires and if I need to get a new set for the 2011 Ranger. I've included a couple of photos for review.

    Having just about the trailer about a month ago, the previous owner included lots of paperwork, but I have no idea the age or milage of the tires. Some online articles state you should replace tires every few years. What do you guys think? What Brand do you recommend?

    I also need to review what goes into changing a trailer tire in case of a blowout / flat. Need to find a good video. Do you carry a jack AND Torque Wrench? Any advice is appreciated![/QUOTE]
    My wife and I were going to full time and went to a workshop at Escapees a few years ago and one of the speakers was a retired tire engineer from Goodyear and he said that trailer and RV tires should replaced every two years. He also suggest taking the temperature of all your tires when you buy fuel and take breaks. If all your tire were about the same temp you were probably good to go but if one is considerably hotter you were headed for a blow out.
    https://www.tirebuyer.com/education/how-to-determine-the-age-of-your-tires
     
  5. Beech350guy

    Beech350guy New Member

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    I cannot over-stress enough the importance of a torque wrench!! I had a HUGE 5th wheel (48 foot) that was required to be taken back to the factory due to an engineering flaw. (The entire roof had to be replaced)

    On the trip out there, the delivery driver (supposedly a professional) decided to "make sure the lug nuts were tight", using a breaker bar and a socket. Apparently he over-tightened most of the lugs. About an hour after he tightened the lugs, two, of the three wheels on the drivers side came off of the trailer at 75 miles an hour. Ironically it happened in front of a state trooper. When the trooper called me, she stated "When tires this size come off at that speed, someone usually dies.... everyone was very lucky today..."

    That being said, pay CLOSE ATTENTION to the torque values on your wheels. Most people are not aware that the axle manufacturers do not publish torque values for aluminum wheels. The only torque values the MFG will give is for steel wheels. Torque values for aluminum wheels come from the RV mfg'r, and not the axle mfg'r.

    Lastly, I strongly suggest never running a trailer tire longer than 4 years. Countless trailers have been totaled when they come apart. They call them "China Bomb's" for a reason.
     
  6. David Joy

    David Joy New Member

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  7. Beech350guy

    Beech350guy New Member

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    I would replace all three. The issue is not with the tread, it's with how the rubber hardens, and they cracks. If you see even small cracks on the outside, it's pervasive throughout the entire tire. Nobody ever wears the tread off of an RV tire (unless they are fulltime travelers), the tires wear out from age.

    My personal rule is 4 years.
     
  8. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    5 to 7 years is good advice. 4 is over cautious. I never used a tourqe wrench. I never seen a tire shop use them eaither. Curious on how tires that were tightened too much fall off?
     
  9. Through the Sequoia

    Through the Sequoia New Member

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    Based on the DOT code on the tire in the picture, those were manufactured in 2010. I would replace them immediately. Ticking time bombs.

    We put the Goodyear Endurance on our trailer and I have been extremely happy with them. You get what you pay for, I've always believed that. I don't understand why people wouldn't pay a bit more for quality products, sure you still have to replace them from dry rot eventually, but peace of mind knowing that I won't have a random blowout on the highway from a "China bomb" tire makes it worth it every day in my book.
     
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  10. A-Ranger12

    A-Ranger12 Active Member

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    The over tightening stretches the mounting studs. Once they're stretched, they lose their strength. A few hours of driving can have them shear off as they weaken over every bump in the road.

    I've snapped off wheel studs before from over tightening, being just 20 ft/lbs over. I was following the spec for steel wheels, not the unpublished aluminum wheel spec. Yes, I was using a torque wrench. Just had bad information.

    I now tighten aluminum wheels to 80 ft/lbs, and steel to 100 ft/lbs. Haven't snapped a stud since.
     
  11. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Maybe because they dont make them for 12 and 13 inch wheels. So most pups have smaller tires and dont have a choice. I think they just added the 14 inch ones recently. So you didn't have a choice but to buy from china as they were the only ones that made them. I never had the china bomb happen, i think because most tires came from china, they got a bad rap. I had china made tires on my pup and had 0 problems.
     
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  12. Toni Ricks

    Toni Ricks New Member

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    I have a 2010 Viking. Had a blowout, a flat and am having a whole new set installed tomorrow. I've been buying 4-80-12's Have a 4 hole rim and they are hard to find. Can I upgrade to a bigger, sturdier tire?
     
  13. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    "China bombs" referred to off brand made in China tires. There are many quality tires made in China also. Name brand tires that are manufactured in China are built to the brand's specs. Off brand cheap tires have no such outside standard. Also, Chinese vehicles tend to drive in cities only* and are smaller and more lightweight than U.S. counterparts. So a Chinese tire used in China is much less likely to be overloaded than that same tire used in the states.

    *During my visit a couple years ago, I was amazed at the road congestion in the cities versus the freeways/highways. The freeways/highways were pretty much empty every day - just a tour bus or small cargo truck every few miles max.
     
  14. Andy G.

    Andy G. Member

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    My 1992 Starcraft pop-up has 5.30x12 tires. I had one blowout last summer, but after inspection, it turns out I had a serious axle problem. It was not the tire's fault. The tire had been slamming against the fender well on every bump. I like Carlyle tires. The quality is very good.
     
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  15. Andy G.

    Andy G. Member

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    I have 4- lug hubs as well. You might be able to go up to 5.30x12 tires. Those have a higher load rating, but may be slightly larger in diameter .
     
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  16. Sws763

    Sws763 New Member

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    I have always believed in torquing the wheels, especially if they are aluminum. I have seen where they weren't torqued and came loose. Not good.
     
  17. DiamondGirl

    DiamondGirl Adventures with KODI in AZ Diamond Supporting Member

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    The first thing we did was replace the tires before the inaugural trip. A family member had a blow out while towing their brand new travel trailer. Their suburban and trailer flipped from the blow out about two miles from home. Thank goodness all were safe. A Big family of seven with three dogs. But it took sometime before the kids were comfortable with towing a travel trailer.

    I got my tires from Costco because I like their tire program and the trailer tires were on sale.

    Happy Camping...[ALPU][PUT]
     
  18. SickPup404

    SickPup404 New Member

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    FYI - I just got three Goodyear Endurance ST225/75R15 to replace the OEM Castle Rock "China bombs" on a used TT we just bought. Bumped up from load range D (2540 lbs) to E (2830 lbs) and L speed rating (75MPH) to N (87MPH).

    Got them from a truck shop that I've dealt with for years for $143 each and with incidentals (mounting, balancing, old tire disposal, etc.) brought entire bill to $501. Best spent money, hands down. Trailer rides better too.
     
  19. FW Arcadia

    FW Arcadia Member

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    I as well am looking at replacing my P/U tires and was going with Goodyear Endurance BUT just today saw where Goodyear is not allowing Trump MAGA hats be worn by employees (as well as anti abortion) but WILL ALLOW BLM LBGQRSTUV apparel. Which brings me to my question.... WHO ELSE BESIDES GOODYEAR ENDURANCE tires can I go with? Thanks
     
  20. Anthony Hitchings

    Anthony Hitchings Well-Known Member Silver Supporting Member

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    Now that's interesting, on my Jeep Cherokee I started deliberately under-torquing the lug nuts with aluminum wheels, in order to get them off later! I do the same on the Liberty.

    From an eTrailer Q&A:
    The studs on your hubs # A35RS545E are 1/2-inch diameter and since your wheels # AM31215 are aluminum, you'll use a torque range of 75-85-ft-lbs.
     
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