Lynx Levelers stop 'n chock

Discussion in 'Leveling Your Camper' started by Halford, Mar 6, 2013.

  1. bheff

    bheff Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,504
    Likes Received:
    920
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2011
    Location:
    NW Arkansas
    I was going to say that Harbor freight has the same ones for $5.99 then you can use a coupon.
    I only chock one side. If I use linx levelers on one side then I chock the opposite side. I also never use the wheel on my tongue jack. Never have had an issue with it moving.
     
  2. LjohnSaw

    LjohnSaw So many fish, so little time...

    Messages:
    843
    Likes Received:
    50
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2011
    Location:
    Northern California
    The problem with the HF chocks is they STINK. They smell so bad like all the rubber they sell. How do the Amazon one smell?

    I only purchased one Lynx chock (was on sale and I wasn't sure how well it would work) and do pretty well with that. As stated above, set up your Lynx ramp with the chock on the end and back up on to it. Then add a normal chock in the front. I use the yellow plastic ones and a rubber mallet (or a short tree branch log) to wack it in tight. I chock the opposite wheel, front and back. Then I unhitch. Those tires are not moving until I want them to.
     
  3. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,347
    Likes Received:
    1,342
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2009
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM

    We added this BAL chock to the collection a couple of years ago, since we got tired of the hard plastic chocks (not Lynx) blowing out from under the tires at home. We use the BAL chock on the low tire when we have to level, and the Lynx chocks on the other, works great, the chock set up with the tire snugged against the Lynx one is very stable. If we're in a level site, the chock on the other side gets jammed under the tire with a rubber mallet. The other half of reducing wiggle for us is to make sure that the tongue jack and stabs are not extended way out. We use stacks of Lynx with caps under each of those. We're much more solid these days. (I always notice when two of us are moving around in the camper anyway, in good part becasue we live in a house built on a slab, so there is no floor shake at home.)
     
  4. lksdrinker

    lksdrinker Active Member

    Messages:
    210
    Likes Received:
    54
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2018
    I have no problem with the top of the blocks not being smooth. Its the size of the blocks. You need to use way more than necessary if you want to also chock that same wheel.
     
  5. davekro

    davekro Active Member

    Messages:
    638
    Likes Received:
    210
    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2019
    Location:
    SF Bay Area, CA
    I did get the top covers. They work very well with the rubber chocks from Amazon. I sidestepped using an extra Lynx lever just to support the rubber chock by using a 3/4" x 4" board under the edge of the 2nd row of leveler. So like using 1/2 a leveler. I may buy a second batch of levelers to completely get away from the blocks I use on the corner jacks. But I did make a bunch of 6x6 blocks out of some used 3/4" marine plywood I had around, which is a perfect size for the corner jacks.

    Someone noted that Harbor Freight sells the exact same rubber chock individually for $1 less, so that is a good place to get them too if it's near you.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2019
  6. Halford

    Halford Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,563
    Likes Received:
    569
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Location:
    Santa Clarita, California
    hello there! I tried the Lynx chocks for my AS Bambi and noticed that there's a gap between chock and tire. What I did was putting a wood wedge similar to the door stop in there and it worked fine. Actually it used up a lot of my setup time to do that. I bought full rubber wheel chocks from Harbor Freight and was pleased with it. I still use Lynx blocks under stabs (yes, Airstream uses very same stabilizers as most popups do) and tongue jack. I used Lynx caps which prevents possible stabs or jack slips. I kept my old Lynx blocks with AS.
     
  7. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,966
    Likes Received:
    1,620
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2007
    Location:
    Ontario
    Not sure I am following you here..
     
  8. lksdrinker

    lksdrinker Active Member

    Messages:
    210
    Likes Received:
    54
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2018
    A single block doesnt have enough surface area to fit the wheel and a chock. I suppose you could wedge the chock under the tire but most of it would hang off the back of the block that way.
     
  9. davekro

    davekro Active Member

    Messages:
    638
    Likes Received:
    210
    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2019
    Location:
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Yes, you need two side by side Lynx blocks for the wheel to sit atop of and have room for the rubber wheel chocks on both sides. If you need to raise 2" (2 levels of Linx blocks), it takes 3 lynx on ground, then 2 lynx on top of those (Pyramid), for 5 total. If 3" rise is needed, it would take 4 more Lynx 'under' the the above, for a total of 9 Lynx blocks.
     
    Snow likes this.
  10. lksdrinker

    lksdrinker Active Member

    Messages:
    210
    Likes Received:
    54
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2018
    Exactly. Kind of a pain to have to do this. I forget how many came in the package, but to really use them "correctly" you need quite a few just in case. Makes it cumbersome. Also means you could easily need to have more than one "set" if you needed anything more than a 1" rise on one side and also wanted to use blocks for each stabilizer!
     
  11. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,347
    Likes Received:
    1,342
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2009
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    There are 10 blocks in a set of Lynx; we have 4 sets. We managed well enough with three, but a killer deal on a set with caps, chocks, and blocks when we needed a couple of new caps last year was too good to pass up. Because we use them stacked under the tongue jack and stabs, depending on the lay of the land in a site, we can use at least 2 sets just for those. It may sound cumbersome, but now that we're used to them, it really isn't. They store and travel compactly in their bags, though I wish those lasted longer, we need to use Tear-Aid on a few seams. For us, they're a better choice than wood - they dry better than wood if it's rainy or muddy, no worries about splinters, or splitting wood (yes, it happened with one of our first homemade blocks), and are easy to toss in odd spaces in the truck bed. I've cracked one block over the years, and two caps. The caps were because I used them incorrectly, when we first had the Retro. I didn't have enough sets yet, and was parked on very soft ground. I tried two of the caps, with no blocks, under the tongue jack foot, (wrongly) thinking it would work better on the soggy grass, leaves, and ground. They sank enough to crack on either side of the foot. Lasted a couple of years more, but we finally replaced them.
     
  12. Rusty2192

    Rusty2192 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,029
    Likes Received:
    455
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2014
    Location:
    Kentucky
    I got that same deal and love the Lynx chock when using the blocks to level, especially when the site is sloped front to back. Because of the way all of the blocks AND the chock lock together, it’s impossible for the chock to move with the weight of the pup on it. I like to back the pup up onto the chock a bit then place the front chock (cheap Camco yellow ones in my case) before releasing the parking brake. That gives a good snug fit. I do think having 2 Lynx chocks is a bit of a waste. The only time I think I would ever use both would be on an extremely sloped site where I may add a single layer of blocks even on the high side just to have a solid chock locked in on both sides to be extra safe.
     
  13. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,347
    Likes Received:
    1,342
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2009
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    We drive onto the blocks, and I can now feel the tire snug up to the chock as I let it creep forward. Just for paranoia's sake, we tend to put the second chock behind the tire. Does make it look like an interesting move to settle a tire in between them of one isn't familiar with them.
    It has always just seemed easier to drive onto the blocks, and reverse off of them. Since we are usually correct in judging how many levels we need (usually 1 or 2) by the look of the bubble on the level, we seldom have to back off and adjust the blocks, though there are those sneaky misleading sites with an odd slope or dip/rise in the ground.
    The BAL chock has been great, since it is fastened around the tire, and works on some surfaces where other chocks need persuasion to stay in place.
     

Share This Page