need opinions / advice please

Discussion in 'Heating / Cooling Systems' started by jetrail, Jan 28, 2008.

  1. PattieAM

    PattieAM New Member

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    Somewhere I saw a 'cooling unit' that was pretty much a fan over ice cubes..... but cannot for the life of me remember where.

    De-humidifiers supposedly help cool by removing the moisture in the air.

    Best wishes for cooler camping!
     
  2. disneyrecords

    disneyrecords New Member

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    Pattie, the fan over ice (usually in a cooler) is called a swamp cooler. Only works in dry climates-- the relative humidity must be lower than the evaporative humidity coming off the ice. Great for Arizona, bad for Illinois. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swamp_cooler

    The A/C problem is something we attempted last year. I bought one of those big, bulky, portable A/C units from a mass retailer last summer. What a piece of junk! Huge! and to top it off, the power cord was defective. Went straight back to the store. Bought a nice fan. Heck with it. Maybe our next pup will have A/C.

    Good luck,
    disneyrecords

    Evan, Rachel, David, and Amy
    1987 Palomino MXL
    2005 Chrysler Town & Country LX
    1995 Ford F-150 XLT 4X4
     
  3. You-And-I

    You-And-I Ozarks Überland Basecamp

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    <b>Swamp Cooler For Campers, Tents, etc.</b>

    Check this out, 12 Volt Swampy portable airconditioner.
    <b>Swampy Website:</b> http://www.swampy.net/

    Alan & Christine
    48 Days Camping 2007
    Bell Canoe
    Tentrax A.T.Off Road Camper
    Jeep Wrangler/Sahara <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_jeep.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Jeep">
    <b>http://offroadcampingclub.com</b>
     
  4. prncssgeek

    prncssgeek New Member

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    The only advice I can offer is this. If you decide on a roof mount ac unit, make sure you add braces. If its not braced correctly, you will have big problems.

    Good luck!

    Lori '63, DH Brian '68, DD Charley '84, DS Zach '05, DGD Anna '03
    80something Coleman Sequoia
    97 Jeep Wrangler "Jesse" TV

    TinekerPup restoration site
     
  5. Cowboy Camper

    Cowboy Camper New Member

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    PattieAM says:
    <BLOCKQUOTE id=quote><font size=1 face="Verdana,Arial,Helvetica" id=quote>quote:<hr height=1 noshade id=quote> De-humidifiers supposedly help cool by removing the moisture in the air. <hr height=1 noshade id=quote></BLOCKQUOTE id=quote></font id=quote><font face="Verdana,Arial,Helvetica" size=2 id=quote>
    I agree, and I use one in my apartment to (hopefully) supplement the A/C at home. My old D-H unit has since broken, but I just got a new one since my place flooded last month. They do a fine job of pulling the moisture from the air, but I wonder how much that really goes toward any cool down affect. <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_question.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Question"> Actually, it does nothing. Here's why.

    A De-Humidifier is in fact (basically) an A/C unit that does not do any cooling of the air. Air Conditioners do also dehumidify the air as a part of the cooling process. D-H units have all of the same parts that an A/C unit has. The difference here (why it doesn't cool the air) is that both coils are in the same housing and in the same room/ambient air.

    HUH?? <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_question.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Question"> Allow me to explain. In an A/C unit, you have a Condenser Coil, and the job of this part is to absorb heat and moisture. This is the coil that is on the inside of your car or home. The other coil is the Evaporator, and this part's job is to release the aforementioned heat and moisture/humidity to the outside. That's the coil on the Outside of your car or home. There's also the Compressor and the Refrigerant, and so on. All are common to both units.

    Here lies the major difference of the two, and why the D-H doesn't cool. Both coils are in the same ambient air. Yes, I already said that, but the point being is simple. Since both coils are in the same atmosphere, any heat taken Out of the air by the Condenser coil is simply put right back Into the Same air by the Evaporator coil. Thus, NO cooling.

    What about the Moisture and Humidity you ask? Again....simple. Remember the coil that 'releases' the moisture? The Evaporator? In an A/C unit this is outside. When your vehicle's A/C is running in the summer you'll see a "Leak" that is of no concern. It's just the Evap. Coil doing it's job by draining the Moisture collected. In my Apartment's A/C unit, this moisture is just dripping out onto the lawn.

    In the D-H unit, this same said moisture is what you drain out of the collection bucket when it gets full. Now then, I am wondering if using a D-H unit with my A/C at home might actually be counter productive? Actually, I don't think so. The A/C unit is still Cooling, but the D-H is taking out even more of that Mugginess from the air. The A/C will provide the cooler air that my D-H is still removing humidity from. Thus, the two together should work well as a team.

    My D-H in my pup will likely do little to nothing to assist in my comfort. But... I hope this has been an Educational Post for y'all to read.

    I was A/C Certified to work on cars in my past folks, so this is truly a post that is meant to Inform y'all. Pattie, by no means did I intend any insult about your post. In fact, it has inspired me to give this lesson for everyone here. Thanks for reading everyone. <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Smile">

    <hr><img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_cowboy.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Cowboy Camper">~ Scott
     
  6. Pete

    Pete Member

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    I think this is what PattieAM was talking about. Its 79.99 at Cabelas.
    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?id=0053085518260a&navCount=1&podId=0053085&parentId=cat280029&masterpathid=&navAction=jump&cmCat=MainCatcat20075-cat280029&catalogCode=IJ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat280029&hasJS=true

    2002 Dodge Caravan
    1997 1224 Starcraft Spacestar
     
  7. bdlaue

    bdlaue New Member

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    Looking for a source for Gizmos reflective bunk end covers.
    Does anyone have a link?

    Thanks, Billy
    Austin, Tx
     
  8. Digger

    Digger Foothills of Central Virginia

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    here ya go...

    http://www.popupgizmos.com/

    Ðigger
    2004 Fleetwood Westlake - StonyBlue
    2002 Econoline E-150
     
  9. James

    James New Member

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    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I just completed a window a/c instalation in the front of my 91 coleman roanoke royale this past summer. The first thing that you need is realistic expectations of what you will get out of a window unit. When you permanently install the unit by cutting a hole in the box, it blows cold air near the floor. Cold air sinks and warm air rises. This problem can be fixed with some well placed fans. I placed one in front of the unit pointed upwards and used two small oscilating units hung from the cieling to move the air around.

    My unit works fanstastic if it is in the shade. The bunkends still get warm if I am camping in the sun. This can be fixed by covering the ends with bunkend covers such as popup gizmos or reflective blankets from cabellas.

    Be sure to get a high enough BTU unit. I started out with 6000 BTUs and had to exchage it for an 8000 BTU unit. Also, look for a unit that will alow the fan to shut off when the thermostat reaches the desired unit. This way you don't waste energy and don't have to listen to the fan the entire night.

    As for installation, I took the front of my trailer apart in order to ensure I did not cut any thing important. I had to remove one support and replace it with one on either side of where I cut the hole. Here is a tip that an old carpenter once told me, "If you don't have to use a tape measure, don't use it". This means simply place the unit where you want it and use a marker to trace the outline, then cut the holes. I actually cut the plastic piece (front of the camper) after removing it from the camper. Once the holes were cut, I simply pushed the unit through the holes and supported the rear of the unit with a piece of angle iron placed between the frame rails on the trailer tounge. Make sure that the unit is at the proper angle to facilitate drainage. You may have to drill a drain hole hole in the angle iron. Then simply trim the unit on the inside of the trailer with baseboard or something. Run the wire neatly. Buy an extension cord to plug it into the campsite electric. I wouldn,t plug it into the outlets in the trailer. This web site may be helpful even though it is installed in the rear of the trailer:
    http://home-and-garden.webshots.com...145105215waLNdq

    I also rearranged the interior of the pup in order to fit the face of the A/C unit.
    Another option is to use a portable a/c unit. I found that even though it was a much easier installation, they are too loud and took up too much space. It is still an option though. Check out this website too. This is pretty much how I did mine. http://www.gallery.pstartech.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=18105

    Hope this is helpful

    James
    91 Coleman Roanoke Royale
     
  10. Tekboy46

    Tekboy46 Member

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    <font size=1>east lake camper said: I'm kinda of leaning towards a portable unit. I'm just trying to figure out a way to duct the exhaust tube out of the camper. As for taking up floor space, I think the unit will set up on top of the cabinet just inside the door. I just can't figure out how to run the exhaust tube outside. Any suggestions????

    </font id=size1>


    I vent the portable AC unit through a hole cut in the floor of the camper; the vent tube attaches to a PVC pipe in the hole and vents to the ground. A small copper tube in a hole right by it drains condensate out of the AC unit. It works well and is easy to set up. Also something to think about... the installation is reversible if you sell and want to keep the portable AC... it would be some work but the floor holes could be patched with plywood, some new tile laid down in the camper and the integrity of the floor would be back. Sidewall AC installation is forever!

    1979 Starcraft Venture
    1996 Ford F150 TV

    Edited by - Tekboy46 on February 27 2008 00:23:26
     
  11. east lake hunter

    east lake hunter New Member

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    Tekboy, how many btus does your portable unit put out???

    Any other suggestions out there besides cutting a hole in the floor for the exhaust tube??

    I have a Flagstaff 206ST and there's a cabinet on both sides of the door which I could set the unit on top of. I just can't figure a way to vent the exhaust tube.
     
  12. jetrail

    jetrail Member

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    east lake hunter ,
    my idea is to take the exhaust tube and vent it where the canvas velcro's to the door frame , just stick the exhaust tube through there , but i haven't bought a unit yet so im not to sure on tube size

    Jay & Lisa
    00 dodge dakota
    97 coleman laredo
    (6) 4 legged children (non camping)
    Luna, Lady, Alley, Azalea, Duckie & Loki all cats lol
     
  13. Xolthrax

    Xolthrax Franconia, Pa.

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    Expect the exhaust tube to be about 4-6" in diameter.


    Joe

    <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_pu.gif border=0 align=middle alt="PopUp">'96 Rockwood Signature Series 1280
    <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_suv.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Tow Vehicle">'07 Ford Explorer
     
  14. east lake hunter

    east lake hunter New Member

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    Some of the units have piece that can be used in connection with a window or patio door. I'm thinking that piece could be modified to fit right next to the door where the canvas velcro's to the door frame.

    My pup is at the dealer right now for some warranty work. When I get it back I'm gonna do some measuring to see if this might work.
     
  15. east lake hunter

    east lake hunter New Member

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    Another idea I have had is to make a stand for window unit that would set outside the pup and blow air through one of the screens in the bunk. I don't want to cut a hole in my screen for this idea, so I'm curious if anyone else has every tried this idea without cutting a hole in the screen.

    I'm thinking about making some sort of material to go around the front of the ac unit that would be velcro'd to the screen. Sort like a tube made out of fabric so the air from the unit would blow directly into the screen.
     
  16. Tekboy46

    Tekboy46 Member

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    east lake, my AC is a portable Sunbeam, 9,000 BTU that draws 8.2 amps. The vent tube is 5" in diameter and the condensate drain tube is about a 5/8" tube. It cools the camper on a 100 degree day in Oklahoma in the sun, but will not freeze you out; it keeps the camper cool and liveable in the daytime. Fans for circulation and bunkend gizmos are a must. After the sun gets low it cools the camper completely and can get cold. I got this AC unit at auction CHEAP, otherwise I would have purchased a 12,000 BTU unit, which is what I'd recommend to anyone contemplating buying a portable for their PUP. I posted in the "deal" thread about a 12k unit at Tuesday Morning coming up for sale at a good price.
    The unit does come with a rectangular, heavy plastic window adapter that the vent tube attaches to. You could pull the velcro loose where the canvas attaches to the door, set the adapter in the opening and brainstorm how to seal that up; some canvas, velcro strips and a heavy needle might produce a custom velcro "patch" that would rain and bug-proof this area and still look decent.
    Before I vented the unit through the floor I just stuck the tube up to the screen on a partially unzipped window and let it exhaust through the screen material when I was doing my first mods. The screen DOES restrict the exhaust flow some, and the screen might restrict your cool air inflow a little if you set up a window unit outside that blows through the screen. At least you could possibly borrow someones small window unit, set it on some kind of stand, unzip a window and see what kind of air flow you get before committing. I hope this helps... in Oklahoma and Arkansas we've got to get all the cool we can squeeze out of these small units!

    1979 Starcraft Venture
    1996 Ford F150 TV
     

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