New sidewall tire pressure different than old tires

Snow

Super Active Member
Jul 19, 2007
11,983
Ontario
Guess it's too late to ask your tire dealer to get you Kenda, Duro or Carlisle tires ??? Seeing how SCTR is only a sourcing company... meaning they import from the cheapest manufacture, they claim to supply OEM products, but the website doesn't list any clients....
 

BoomJammer

Jason
May 17, 2012
217
Yes, a little too late to make brand specific requests at this point. But I'll keep these brands in mind for future tire purchases. Thanks for the recommendations.

In terms of these Hi-Run tires, I'll just do my best to be diligent about maintaining 65 PSI tire pressure before all road segments.

Do I need to run these tires around town to "break" them in before heading out on a 400+ mile trip? Or should they be good to go as installed?
 

gruss

Super Active Member
May 6, 2014
1,252
bring the torque wrench and check them around 100 miles or so. some tend to "loosen" up. I'm not aware of any break in for trailer tires...not something I'd worry about but someone may have another opinion.

I'm leery of that bearing that mysteriously became loose...would hope any self respecting tire shop would make sure that's all been taken care of, make sure nothing is scorching hot on the wheels when you stop for potty breaks or whatever.
 

BoomJammer

Jason
May 17, 2012
217
gruss said:
I'm leery of that bearing that mysteriously became loose...

Yes. Me too. They said they've taken care of it now. I'm definitely going to bring the bottle jack (always carry it anyway), and check for play in the wheel after I've gone down the road a ways. I might even tow the trailer around this weekend (for grins) and check the wheel before we hit the road later this month.
 

vinmaker

Super Active Member
Aug 22, 2014
862
Many of these Chinese tires used by manufacturers today are not getting good reviews. You are best to keep an eye on them and replace them after a few years. Search the internet for RV China bombs. lol. That is the term that people have given them.

Vin.
 

CamperMike

Super Active Member
Sep 27, 2012
1,015
Hi-run is an inexpensive tire out of china. I put them on my popup however and they have not caused any issues in the year I've had them on (and I do actually travel with the trailer.... that year probably saw 3K miles or so on the tires). I will say you won't likely get a lot of miles out of the tires... I expect 2-3 years of use and I'll be needing new ones. When I did research on these tires, there were plenty of people referring to them as "china bombs" but few people that actually had first-hand poor experiences with them other than a couple complaints of poor treadwear. I would say they should be safer than radial tires that are not built for the load of your trailer.
 

BoomJammer

Jason
May 17, 2012
217
CamperMike said:
I would say they should be safer than radial tires that are not built for the load of your trailer.

Is that a reference to the idea of using LT tires?

I'm glad to hear that you have had modest success with Hi-Run tires.
 

CamperMike

Super Active Member
Sep 27, 2012
1,015
BoomJammer said:
Is that a reference to the idea of using LT tires?

I'm glad to hear that you have had modest success with Hi-Run tires.
No I mean that they are most likely bsafer than the lrc tires that were originally installed.
 

JeffC

Super Active Member
Nov 30, 2014
1,087
Your bearing wasn't adjusted correctly or a cotter pin wasn't installed. There is no rotational force to break that pin. I would be concerned about the whole job. Your ideas to learn to do it yourself (very easy) and to frequently check it are both good.
 

BoomJammer

Jason
May 17, 2012
217
JeffC said:
Your bearing wasn't adjusted correctly or a cotter pin wasn't installed. There is no rotational force to break that pin.

So I should be able to determine if they got it right this time after just a short test tow, right? i.e., the five mile drive home should be enough to know if they fixed it. I'll try jacking up the trailer tonight to check it out.

JeffC said:
our ideas to learn to do it yourself (very easy) and to frequently check it are both good.

Anybody have a good reference/link for how to pack bearings? Pictures are worth a thousand words in my book. I think I have the concept in my mind, but I often seem to find the wrong ways to do the right things.
 

gruss

Super Active Member
May 6, 2014
1,252
A search on YouTube for repacking bearings will give you 1000's of results, and probably do a better job explaining than I can type.
 

Nedley

New Member
Apr 14, 2015
9
We use some of those "hi-run" tires on trailers at my work (I work for the county, and i promise our guys do *not* treat those trailers easy)... We really don't have any issues with them. We also run Marathons, and some Carlisle's .. I think out of the three, I would say Marathon is the best, and Hi-Run would be second, and Carlisle's would be 3rd. You will be fine with those tires.. I assure that our crew's rarely ever actually pay attention to how much they are loading on a trailer.. or, how much pressure is in the tires.. and they hold up fine.
I want to put a note in here about tire pressure.. please *always* go by the rating on the tire itself.. *not* the trailer (this applies to all tires) .. when a manufacturer builds something.. they have no idea of what is going to happen 2 or 5..and certainly not 10, years in the future. When I was in high school, all tires where bias, and inflated to about 28 psi.. lol.. now there are very few tires that run less than even 44 psi... so go with the tire rating... the original manufacturer of the trailer or car has no idea what tire technology will be in the future after the original OEM tires need to be replaced.
As far as the wheel bearing.. That was sloppy work, and I'm sure someone really got chewed out, or unemployed.. as previously stated, a cotter pin should never shear off, there is no real rotational force.. actually, I guess there is on one side of the trailer, that is trying to unscrew the nut as the wheel turns, but.. I guess it would have had to be severely overtightened, or, more likely... the pin was never even installed. BUT.. I would not lose a lot of sleep over it.. they found the problem, and fixed the problem. No one is perfect, and although I personally would not take a vehicle back to a place that made multiple mistakes on one visit.. I also would not stress about it a whole lot, and just be thankful that they caught it (and even admitted to it) .. and fixed it for you.
 

niagarafam

Super Active Member
Jan 25, 2014
2,157
BoomJammer said:
So I should be able to determine if they got it right this time after just a short test tow, right? i.e., the five mile drive home should be enough to know if they fixed it. I'll try jacking up the trailer tonight to check it out.

Anybody have a good reference/link for how to pack bearings? Pictures are worth a thousand words in my book. I think I have the concept in my mind, but I often seem to find the wrong ways to do the right things.

Hi BoomJammer,

There's a ton of great bearing, axle, and tire discussion with pics and video under tires, brakes, and axles here on the Portal. I was in a similar quandary, having under rated C load tires from the factory that rapidly wore due to the fact that they met the bare minimum of the vehicle's weight. Just another example of manufacturer corner cutting. We went through etrailer and purchased D rated Kenda radials - so far so good. Packing your bearings is certainly a DIY job for just about anyone.

In this video, the tech uses a bearing packer. They are great. But I am very tactile, and I like packing mine by hand. I also already have a major space problem with tool storage. It's important to learn to do your own brake inspections and adjustments, too. The two jobs go hand in hand. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5ZhZBSY7hI

I look forward to talking in person at the rally!
Martin
 




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