New to Camping with a Dog...

Discussion in 'Camping with Kids/Pets' started by tcbrady, Nov 6, 2019.

  1. tcbrady

    tcbrady Active Member

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    Good morning everyone! So good news after searching and applying to adoptions over the past few months - we finally found the right pup for us! He's a happy little healthy Pug - soon to be named Bobby. We'll be picking him up in two weeks and couldn't be happier. Camping season is over for us here in Pennsylvania but since we do quite a bit of camping the rest of the seasons we're planning on bringing him along with us. We're new to the whole pet camping situation so I'm reaching out looking for some advice, tips, products that are must haves etc. So please, share your wisdom! [:D] [DOG]
     
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  2. nineoaks2004

    nineoaks2004 Every meal is a picnic and every Day is a holiday

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    Teach to walk on a lead as most CG's limit pets to a 6' lead we use a dog halter instead of a collar. Pebbles sleeps on the bed with me if DW is not camping with me, But I have a doggy bed for her anyway. House break and take him out regularly to do his business, (take plastic bags along to clean up after him) he will need his own food and water bowl
    I carry plenty of her favorite treats, and favorite toys to keep her occupied. I have a couple of the dog play yards but only use then when the other 3 fur babies are along as it does not contain Pebbles she jumps/ climbs over it to get to me. I also carry a dog coat for cold weather. Have lots of fun with him as they are really enjoyable to have along .
    Good Luck and happy camping
     
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  3. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    Congrats on the new addition. Every dog is different, but the first and most important thing is to socialize Bobby well. The more situations you expose him to now will make camping far easier for you when it’s time to start camping again. Just like us practice makes perfect you may have to practice camping a few to a dozen times. The hardest part for most puppies and even adult dogs is to ignore all the action just beyond your campsite. This is where the saying a tired dog is a good dog comes into play. Exercise your pup well just before you sit back and relax he will more likely be able to ignore activity and then praise him for being good. At first carry some good training treats with you at all times so you can reward for good behavior. Good luck and most important have fun. Dogs can be a lot of work at first, but once you get them trained they can become a great and loving companion.
     
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  4. Raycfe

    Raycfe Waterford Ct.

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    IMG_0521.jpg Quincy says HI
     
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  5. JunieB

    JunieB Active Member

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    Socialize. Train. Repeat often. Easier to train a dog to "do" something like sit, than to extinguish unwanted behaviors.
    Excessive barking is the greatest annoyance in campgrounds. Try to teach a "quiet" command. When the pup alerts at something at home, I start with What's the matter? It's OK-- QUIET! then treat AFTER they do get quiet. Never leave unattended in the PUP; small dogs will find a way out! Remember there will be areas near CG you can't take the dog along to-- beaches, quick run into the WalMart. May want a doggie playpen, little portable plastic fenced area with a small dog like a pug, or a dog crate.
     
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  6. MNTCamper

    MNTCamper Well-Known Member

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    Work hard to train the dog as others have noted. I would say that the main thing that frustrates folks is if there is a dog camping that barks a lot - whether at animals, people walking by... If you can train your dog to be mostly content around the camp site, that will help a lot. We camp with two larger dogs that go with us on longer trips and they are good campers now, maybe too interested in squirrels, but they do fine. Biggest issue for us is that no dogs allowed on trails in National Parks which we frequent. Other than that, it is just planning for food and so on and ALWAYS picking up after your animal when they go to the bathroom.
     
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  7. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    6ft leash. No retractable leashes!

    Get an engraved ID tag that includes Buddy's name, your cell phone number AND your vehicle and trailer license plate numbers. This will allow someone to find you in the campground easily if he gets loose - even if there is no cell service.

    Keep a copy of his rabies cert in the vehicle and in the trailer. You never know if you might need it (a pug is unlikely to bite someone, but HE could get bit and that cert could save unnecessary treatment or quarantine).

    Socialize and train. Get him used to car rides. Obedience training is the best thing you can do. A harness is good for a pug as they have breathing issues and a collar can exacerbate it.

    When camping, keep him on a leash. No matter how well-behaved HE is, you can't be sure of other dogs. Don't leave him outside unattended (tethered or penned) for even a few minutes - that's all it can take for another dog to reach him and do damage. And remember, a pug doesn't have a good fighting body - even if they think they do. The worst they can usually do is to gum the other to death. :) That means that if attacked, the pug will have a difficult time protecting himself.

    Obey the dog rules. If no dogs on beach or trails - don't take him. If no dogs left unattended in RVs - don't do it. Clean up after your dog always. This is the only way we can be sure to keep dog-friendly campgrounds.

    Don't let him do his business in other campsites - even if it's right on the edge. Get him used to going close to "home" and not needing a walk to do it. Folks don't really like watching you leave your campsite and head to theirs so your dog can pee/poop, and then head back to yours. This is the same at home - teach your dog to potty on your property and save the walks for entertainment.

    Also, as he is a pug, be very careful about hot weather camping. Their breathing issues can cause them to overheat much more quickly than other long muzzled dogs. Talk to your vet about ways to help and signs to watch for.

    Over this winter, watch to see how settled his tummy is. If he has a delicate stomach and gets sick easily, then you will want to bring water from home for him. If he has a stomach like a goat, then you can give him potable water from the campground.

    Now, with all that, don't worry too much if he isn't perfect at the getgo or even ever. He can't be expected to know proper camping ettiquete if he's never been camping. If he barks, just gently and consistently correct him. Other campers will understand if they see you putting in the effort. For the most part, people just want to know that YOU realize the barking is annoying and are trying to stop it, rather than going inside or driving away while he's out there barking nonstop.

    And barking at something is different than barking at nothing. Barking because a deer came into the campsite, etc., is OK for the most part. Barking because he's bored, unhappy, stressed, etc., needs to be dealt with - and may take some time to see progress.

    Last, but not least, he is a member of your family. Include him in the activities. If you are going someplace where dogs can't share the day with you, then consider not taking him. If you want to take him, choose campgrounds and places where he can have fun too.

    Bat-dog and Moose-dog love camping. They love hunting lizards and smelling all the outdoor smells. They love wading in the water. They love being with me. They get antsy between trips. To me, that means I'm doing it right. :)
     
  8. davekro

    davekro Active Member

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    Toadtoes, we've had dog experience for years, but your thorough sharing of your expertise gave me lots of good info and tips for dogs at camp AND at home! Thanks.
     
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  9. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. A lot of it is common sense and putting yourself in the other person's shoes or dog's paws. And understanding the dog's breed(s).

    The ID tags are really important. With the tag, a ranger can look up your vehicle in the campsite registrations and find your contact info - even if you've had to leave the campground and go home.
     
  10. JunieB

    JunieB Active Member

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    Mostly, my dogs just love camping. There is nothing better to them than hanging out near a campfire, under a picnic table-- smelling new smells--tethered, of course. Then get to sleep in this great, small den all-together instead of a sprawling home-- heaven in dog-dom.
     
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  11. Zephyr

    Zephyr Active Member

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    Many rv steps have drain holes that can catch and break a dog's claws. There are rugs available to cover the step and save your buddy from some pain.

    We keep an indoor water dish (a rectangular food storage box that fits right next to the door) and an outdoor water dish. Keeps the pups hydrated and we don't have to remember to move the dish back and forth.

    Figure out where the dog is going to be when you set up camp. Ours are excited to get outside the car, but we need them out of the way while we set up. If in a campground, we can usually attach leashes to the picnic table temporarily, then move them to the Chalet's bumper when we are done with set up.

    Before camping season starts up, take your dog on walks in parks to get used to noises, smells, other dogs, etc. that you don't have at home.

    Take your some of your dog's bedding from home, so it's familiar when camping.
     
  12. Ruby Jean

    Ruby Jean Member

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    Don't forget some basic first aid supplies for the dog. Vet wrap and bandages, saline rinse for eyes, dog safe anti-diarrhea med, wound treatment stuff. Disposable rubber booties for paw injuries. Have camped for years with multiple terriers, needed it all and then some. Get a spill proof water dish for inside the trailer - limited floor space makes it too easy to accidentally kick the bowl and have a wet mess. Most of all have fun and enjoy hanging out with your fur friend!
     
  13. Zephyr

    Zephyr Active Member

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    Adding to the first aid supplies: fine-tipped scissors and something to remove pine pitch. The scissors are helpful for removing burs stuck right next to the skin. Short-haired dogs probably don't get these as often, but our terriers are bur magnets.

    Our guys love to stand up with paws on tree trunks, the better to glare at squirrels, but end up with pitch in their pads. Crisco, butter and other oily substances work to loosen the pitch, and then I clip it away with the scissors.
     
  14. PointyCamper

    PointyCamper Active Member

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    ...
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2019
  15. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    Crates can backfire. I have had to "un -crate-train" several dogs because they became too dependent and/or aggressive with the crate.

    For my dogs, I am their "safe place". When they get scared, they come to me for protection. I prefer it that way. They will happily go in a crate if required, but they are not dependent upon it.
     
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  16. Lloyd B

    Lloyd B Active Member

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    We rescued our dog while we were full timers. And crate trained her from the beginning. She goes into the crate at night and whenever we had to leave her alone in the trailer, and when in the tow vehicle. Some states now require pets be restrained in a vehicle, and the crate makes it easy. If you want to visit a attraction that will not allow dogs, for any length of time, you can often find a doggy day care, or boarding kennel for a day. Some areas have mobile vets, that will come to the campground, check with the office, they often have knowledge about local vets. Enjoy your new best friend.
     
  17. firepit

    firepit Well-Known Member

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    We have two dogs that are bed sleepers with us...My wife sleeps on one bunk with a dog and i sleep on the other bunk with a dog.
    Our older dog cannot jump into the bunk by herself anymore so at night we put the dining table down and she can jump on it and then into the bunk.
    Our dogs are totally used to the camper but we never left them in there alone at first for fear they would shred the inside.
    Anymore if they are ready for bed they will stand by the door and we let them in and go about our business.
    Some campgrounds are really strict about dogs being on a leash.
    I think dogs settle right into a camping routine like anything else.
    After a few time they figure things out and camping becomes normal and they love it...Ours sure do.
     
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  18. tcbrady

    tcbrady Active Member

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    We're getting closer to the begin of the camping season here in PA. Our first trip is logged for the 17th of April and it couldn't come soon enough. We picked up a few items for the dog, but we think he'll do really well! Just hoping he doesn't bark at everything little thing. [::)] I'm sure in time, he'll get used to it and be good to go, especially since we camp usually twice a month on long weekends all throughout the camping seasons. Last year we logged 16 trips! Although, I've been told by the wife this year we won't get near that. (We'll see about that!) Just going to be a little bit of a learning curve for him is all, but we're all excited! [DOG]:grin:
     
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  19. Arlyn Aronson

    Arlyn Aronson Well-Known Member

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    The secret to dogs is there training. If they don't think you are in control, then they'll bark. They need to looking at you for advice. Our mutts are only modesty trained but we take them everywhere. The younger kelpie has been challenging but at 2.7, he's finally listening... [DOG] Lots of good advice from people here and I will add that a tired dog, is a good dog. Just like people, they need exercise.....

    I should add, at the campground or the dog park, is not the place to start training your dog. At home and in your neighborhood, it needs to be extensively done long in advance. A trained and socialized mutt, is fun to have long. That's why we do it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2020
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  20. gladecreekwy

    gladecreekwy Well-Known Member

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    CE94ADCE-BD36-40AD-9CB0-D367A25BED3A.jpeg D43F74E5-F3EE-4556-BBBB-778410F1E035.png FF416D95-2C10-4806-A3F2-C7B016AD6D25.jpeg My buddy Chuck loves camping more than anything. Although we don’t use campgrounds keeping him under control and safe is number one. Lots of ways to get into trouble no matter where you camp. I keep a close eye on him at all times and am ready to stick him inside if needed.
     
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