No battery

Discussion in 'Wiring' started by Natureangel, Aug 6, 2019.

  1. Natureangel

    Natureangel Everythings better outdoors...

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    I have a 2000 Rockwood Freedom 1940 that does not have a battery. There is no rack or wires that I can find.
    My question is how hard is it to add a battery?
    Bonus question, can you charge the battery with your tow vehicle?
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Shaman1

    Shaman1 Well-Known Member

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    It's not hard to add a battery. To charge it with your car, you will need a 7-pin RV plug on your car and the trailer wired for it.
     
  3. rabird

    rabird Howdy!

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    Blue = circuit breaker or inline fuse, yellow is splice. A few rig terminals (battery + & - and each side of circuit breaker), a screw for neg white wire to frame ground & a few feet of colored wires.
    batt-1.jpg
     
  4. Natureangel

    Natureangel Everythings better outdoors...

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    I didn’t see anyplace to attach to the inverter?
     
  5. Raycfe

    Raycfe Waterford Ct.

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    The red wire in the above post is the connection to the convertor.
     
  6. rabird

    rabird Howdy!

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    Natureangel, there should already be a 'charge line' from the power center/converter to the trailer/vehicle connector.

    On the back of the converter is generally several wires for 12v. Usually the red one is for battery + .
    Often it connects to a different colored wire, goes thru the floor and to the front of the trailer.
    If you can isolate this wire you can splice into it. The battery neg goes to the trailer frame, drill a small hole and attach with a screw and washer.
     
  7. NavarWynn

    NavarWynn Member

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    Specifically, the 'converter's' typical purpose is to do the following: a) receive/provide a circuit breaker for/ and distribute 110VAC; b) (if plugged into 110VAC) provide ~12VDC out to trailer lights (converted from 110VAC), any other low voltage accessories so equipped, and provide a low level (slow) charge for the battery (if so equipped); or c) (if NOT plugged in to 110VAC 'shore power') distribute 12VDC from the battery directly to those accessories earlier mentioned, lights, and even a 12v fridge (if so equipped).

    An 'inverter' is not typically equipped by the OEMs (not that I've seen at least), since the battery capacity is usually not adequate to run even a smaller one for very long. If you need to have a small amount of 110VAC (for say a laptop power supply or something), it's not impractical, but it will certainly kill the battery quicker. If you plan for this need, expanding your battery bank proportionally is a good idea. As mentioned above, if you wire it properly, charging your battery pack off of your vehicle's alternator is obviously completely doable. If you are going to be discharging the battery deeply though, you want to make sure you are disconnecting the vehicle, as the system shares battery capacity when wired together, and may very well discharge your vehicle's starting battery (although you can wire in a 'charging circuit' to prevent this)
     

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