Noob question....

Discussion in 'Power - Site Power/Batteries/Generators/Solar' started by Wayovrpar, Aug 7, 2019.

  1. Wayovrpar

    Wayovrpar New Member

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    if my converter charges my battery while connected to shore power....why do I need a maintainer during off season? Can I just leave it plugged in?
     
  2. joet

    joet Well-Known Member

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    You could leave it plugged in, but convertors don't do the best job of maintaining a battery
     
  3. Raycfe

    Raycfe Waterford Ct.

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    They may have a chance of overcharging them and boil out the water in the batteries.
    It would also be a good idea to disconnect the battery over a long period, even remove it from the camper
     
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  4. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    Depending on the year of your trailer, the make and model of the converter and the year it was built, It may be just a straight forward charger like the old car chargers were, putting out a fixed number of amps until disconnected, it could be a two stage charger which will give a high amp charge until a certain % of charge is back on the battery then drop the supplied amps by about 50% for as long as the trailer is powered, lastly it could be what is called a smart charger that while similar to the two stage also has a maintain function that once the battery reaches about 90-95% capacity it will trickle charge and cycle on and off to maintain the battery at over close to 100%...

    So what is the converter info ?? that is the important question ..
     
  5. Wayovrpar

    Wayovrpar New Member

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    Centurion 3000. Trailer is a 2000 Flagstaff.
     
  6. giadiep

    giadiep Active Member

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    I pull my battery out and bring it inside the house during the winter. Cold weather is not good for a battery. I do not "trickle charge" the battery though. Just charge it up fully before storing it for the winter and fully charge it in the spring before re-installing.
     
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  7. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    With our '10 Coleman pup, we just pulled the battery for the winter, and put it on the charger once a month.
    We were doing the same with the dual 6 v batteries on the TT, but they are a pain to get in and out of the tight quarters on the TT's a-frame. Last winter, we just left it plugged in, but we suspected that batteries were ready to be replaced, after 4 full seasons, including a stressful first season with them, when we chased an electrical gremlin for months. I'm not sure what we'll do for the off-season this time; it's basically from Dec 1 until Feb. or early March.
     
  8. tfischer

    tfischer Well-Known Member

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    Same here. I do the same thing with our lawn tractor battery.
     
  9. Annunzi

    Annunzi Member

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    We keep our pup in our garage over the winter and I leave it plugged in. Been doing this for 4 years with a group 24 battery and I've never had an issue with the battery losing it's charge (our first trip of the year is 3 days and we usually run the furnace and water pump, although we have upgraded to LED interior lights).
     
  10. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    At best you will have a two stage charger.. Could boil the battery dry and destroy it..
     
  11. NavarWynn

    NavarWynn Member

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    ^^^ This. No way a 2000 model year has a smart charger. Leaving it plugged in will likely kill the battery.

    Frankly, unless it gets blisteringly cold, I'd leave it in, disconnect the B+ post (I personally like to have the B+ post switched to make connection/disconnection simple), and attach a maintainer charger. A fully charged battery has to get pretty cold to do damage to it (~-90F), but a partially discharged one freezes at a much higher temp (SOC 40% = ~-16F), and the more discharged, the closer to 32F it will freeze. If it freezes, it'll likely never work right again. The maintenance charger is the critical component though, since a LA battery self discharges at 2-6% (depending on temp) per week, in a cold region, a winter un-maintained will almost certainly result in a frozen battery.

    However, just pulling it off the TT, and taking it inside isn't ideal either - not without a maintenance charger. Self-discharge means that, regardless of temp, if the charge is un-maintained, the acid breaks down, leaving the sulfur detached and able to crystallize on the plates (sulfation is the technical term) - which is what it does when ionic sulfur sit in the cell, undisturbed, for a while. Those crystals don't recombine to form electrolyte (when charged) well, which degrades the battery's capability considerably - sulfation is one of the primary killers of LA batts. You never want to leave a LA battery for extended periods with anything less than a full charge.
     
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