Old Pop Ups not allowed in Malibu!!!

Discussion in 'General Camping Discussion Forum' started by Kasey Redrum, Nov 5, 2021.

  1. Anthony Hitchings

    Anthony Hitchings Well-Known Member

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    we spent the last night of our last trip at an RV park in Lee Vining, CA. The overnight temp. was 46 deg F. Opposite us was one group of friends tent camping. One of whom slept outside in bivy (bivouac) bag - now that minimalist. Its also how I slept decades ago on my first long backpack trip, over a week long in the South Island of New Zealand.
     
  2. Jkoht

    Jkoht Member

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    You know what they say..
     

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  3. 1380ken

    1380ken Well-Known Member

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    It is not the camper, it is the people they are trying to weed out. All people can be low class but they are trying to limit riffraff, last year we had a family set up across from us. Constant yelling and swearing and they had young children, they were in tents .
     
  4. Glen Gallo

    Glen Gallo New Member

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    So I guess my 1998 is not welcome

    Malibu has a couple State parks you can slum in
     
  5. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Un-Supported Member

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    So, I guess tents have to be less than 10 years old now, too.
     
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  6. tfischer

    tfischer A bad day camping beats a good day at the office

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    It's a snobbish, broad-brush technique to keep the place "high class". I've watched some YT channels where they have beautifully restored vintage campers (e.g. Airstreams don't look any different brand new than they did 40 years ago) and they said it's hit and miss whether they can camp at these places.
     
  7. NegrilJerry

    NegrilJerry Newbies in GA, we LOVE this site!

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    While we may go semi-darkside sometime soon (hybrid!) we'll never bother RV parks unless we know the folks there. Most RV "campsites" are in fact treeless parking spots (usually parallel), where it's so easy to borrow a cup of sugar from your neighbor (does anyone do that anymore?) or hear their satellite TV blasting all day. To find a glampish RV without a sat dish in front these days is something of a anthropological wonder. I always have a dozen movies on my tablet when camping, and we always watch zero of 'em...not why we're there.
     
  8. davido

    davido Well-Known Member

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    But what should they do?

    I hate the 10 year rule. My 2015 is kept under a cover all the time and is in fantastic shape. But let's consider what problem they're trying to solve. It may not be as nefarious as you think.

    • People who move in and refuse to leave. This happens. Eviction is expensive and hard to do right.
    • Meth lab / Drug abuser campers
    • Last resort, not-quite-homeless campers
    In short, they're trying to avoid nuisance occupants who refuse to leave, make a mess of everything, and generally cause trouble. They're trying to avoid becoming Venice Beach, CA or Marine Drive, OR.

    So why the 10-year rule?

    An RV less than ten years old has a higher barrier to entry; costs more to get into. It may even have been financed, which means a bank must have decided the person is a good credit risk. A good credit risk is going to be someone who is employed, or otherwise has the means to pay, and a place to go at the end of the trip. An RV less than ten years old is less likely to have a wheel fall off and be abandoned for scrap on-site. An RV less than ten years old is less likely to be a meth lab or home of last resort for those living on the fringes of society. Such a distinction may seem heartless, but do you want to be unable to feel safe at a campground full of squatters?

    10-year is an arbitrary rule that has nothing directly to do with whether the camper belongs at an RV park. But it has an incidental relationship with the sort of person who may show up. I know, a hundred people on the forum will say "Mine is over 10 years old and I'm not a derelict." And they're all right. It's a terrible metric. But think of it as if you were an insurance adjuster. You've crunched the numbers and somehow you've determined that if there's a 2% chance of encountering a real troublemaker in the 10-years-or-newer crowd, and a 6% chance in the older-than-ten-years crowd, you can surmise that people with campers over 10 years old are 3x more likely to cause a problem, even if the gross likelihood is low.

    The cost of dealing with a troublemaker is very high. Increased on-site crime, eviction processes, damaged campground reputation, and so on. So even if the overall likelihood is low, the need to avoid troublemakers is very high.

    Additionally, we're now living in a world where the campgrounds have almost no problem filling the majority of their sites. If they can achieve 90% occupancy through the months they care about without taking on older RVs, or they can take on older RVs and run at 100% capacity but with stressed out staff, costly nuisance problems, and so on, they're going to draw a line in the sand and stand by it.

    But like most good people, I hate such an arbitrary rule. The problem is that I don't see a really good alternative. Should campgrounds require background checks first? Should they require some sort of "seaworthiness survey & certification" be done on RVs annually to qualify for entry? There's no infrastructure for all this. I suppose pre-authorizing credit cards for 15 days worth of camping plus some sort of clean and vacate deposit could help.
     
  9. tfischer

    tfischer A bad day camping beats a good day at the office

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    I just noticed the "$200 a night" from the original post. Wow, I try to avoid paying that much on hotel rooms on a vacation much less a "campground".

    I doubt any RV Resort that charges that much is going to have much of a problem with transients setting up meth labs and needing to be evicted, any more than the Disney Grand Floridian does.
     
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  10. popup-flyer

    popup-flyer Active Member

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    I hate to say it but bottom line... its a free country. They have their rights and you have yours. Just because you don't like what they decided to do with their rights doesn't make them wrong. Private businesses can have their own set of rules.

    Rules applied equally to all entrants are not discriminatory. Having said that, asking for photos means their decision is subject to the whim of the person evaluating the photos and therefore flawed. If they just said 10 years or newer period...... and stuck to that rule no exceptions.

    Still, its a free country. The best way to "get revenge" is simply not patronize their business(es) and spread the word which is the freedom you chose to exercise.

    I exercised my similar rights not long ago after arriving at 8pm at a Texas campground and being thrown out for showing up "so late" after being told by the crazy owners wife it was ok to do so over the phone. We were left scrambling to find a place in a foreign, small Texas town when we should have been set up and eating dinner.

    Letting people know what they might face in a similar situation is how you help others avoid complications on their own trip so thanks for the heads up. I always remind my wife to double and triple check the campgrounds rules.

    Truth be told I prefer state/public parks because private ones are often cramped sites where when sitting in the dining slide out and looking out the window I could ask for that proverbial cup of sugar from the family sitting 3 feet from said window :( That is the private places right after all, maximize profits but creating more spots.
     
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