Poll: Food in the pup - What do you do?

Discussion in 'General Camping Discussion Forum' started by BikeNFish, Jan 8, 2019.

Do you store, prepare, eat or cook food in the pup? (Pick multiple if needed)

  1. I eat in the pup.

    117 vote(s)
    68.0%
  2. I cook in the pup.

    60 vote(s)
    34.9%
  3. I prepare my food in the pup.

    81 vote(s)
    47.1%
  4. I store food in my pup.

    110 vote(s)
    64.0%
  5. I would change my above answers when in bear country.

    96 vote(s)
    55.8%
  6. I do NOT change anything when in bear country.

    8 vote(s)
    4.7%
  7. Food is NEVER allowed in the pup at any time.

    14 vote(s)
    8.1%
  8. Other

    16 vote(s)
    9.3%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    I have read many studies like that, and as with the others, there is no mention of bears connecting an RV with a fridge and therefore with food.

    I suspect you are looking at this from a broad "bears are attracted to food and will seek out known sources of food" and missing my point about the specific food source of RV fridges not being a known source by bears.

    When I started camping in bear territory with an RV, I specifically asked rangers if I needed to store my food in the provided bear lockers. I was told no. Simply keep food out of visual sight inside the RV - such as in cupboards and the fridge, and it would be fine. Don't leave coolers on the seats in the cab of the motorhome or on the dinette table, etc.

    There is no need to not use your RV fridge unless there is a specific warning at that campground not to do so, because bears in general have not correlated RV - fridge - food. And I know of no campground that has posted that specific warning.

    There are few campgrounds that ban popups due to bears. In those areas, stupid people have taught bears to associate canvas habitats with food. In those areas, leaving food in a popup fridge would reinforce that association - however, popups are not allowed there so it is a moot argument. For campgrounds that allow popups, I have yet to see the "no food in popup fridge" warning.

    And yes, I do agree the bear problems are caused by people.
     
  2. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    The only behavior that I have seen that could resemble this is when people have fed a specific bear at the door of their RV and the bear has then torn apart the RV looking for more food. But those are few and far between, are specific to one bear, and the bear is not looking for food in the RV because food was kept in the RV fridge, but rather because the owner was teaching the bear "I have food in this big box".

    That is different than the bear learning "if you go in this big box, you will find a specific cupboard, and this cupboard will be filled with food" .

    I will add that if you can safely store a cooler of food in your tow vehicle, then you can safely store food in your RV fridge. There is no difference between their scent potential - and a cooler is far more likely to be associated with potential food on sight.
     
  3. tombiasi

    tombiasi Well-Known Member

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    They learn if they have ever seen food come out of it. If they have come to know the camper has contained food they may check it out. In the federal lands where I camp you are not allowed to have a cooler or anything that looks like a cooler in plain sight.
     
  4. tombiasi

    tombiasi Well-Known Member

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    They probably lumped them in with grizz.
     
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  5. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    Per https://www.nps.gov/katm/learn/photosmultimedia/brown-bear-frequently-asked-questions.htm#2:

    All grizzly bears are brown bears, but not all brown bears are grizzly bears. The bears you are watching on the cams are brown bears. Grizzly bears and brown bears are the same species (Ursus arctos), but grizzly bears are currently considered to be a separate subspecies (U. a. horribilis). Due to a few morphological differences, Kodiak bears are also considered to be a distinct subspecies of brown bear (U. a. middendorfii), but are very similar to Katmai’s brown bears in diet and habits.

    Even though grizzlies are considered to be a subspecies of brown bear, the difference between a grizzly bear and a brown bear is fairly arbitrary. In North America, brown bears are generally considered to be those of the species that have access to coastal food resources like salmon. Grizzly bears live further inland and typically do not have access to marine-derived food resources.

    Besides habitat and diet, there are physical and (arguably) temperamental differences between brown and grizzly bears. Large male brown bears in Katmai can routinely weigh over 1000 pounds (454 kg) in the fall. In contrast, grizzly bears in Yellowstone National Park weigh far less on average. There have been no documented cases of grizzly bears weighing over 900 pounds (408 kg) in Yellowstone. Additionally, grizzly bears seem to react to humans at greater distances than brown bears.
     
  6. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    Did you even read what you quoted? I have pointed out that bears recognize coolers as potential food multiple times. That has nothing to do with an RV fridge.
     
  7. tombiasi

    tombiasi Well-Known Member

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    You are putting way too much weight on the fridge comment.
    I said they "may" check it out. I also agree that it is not very likely but they may. You said your pup gets cooked in and you store food in it. The fridge is a moot point. ( If you didn't say you cook in the pup I take it back)
     
  8. Dave Brick

    Dave Brick El Cheapo Family Camper

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    I think it's because, when communicating in a written, rather than face-to-face format, saying "you need more education" sounds like, "You don't know what you're talking about." Its challenging. You might phrase it differently if you were face-to-face, or at least your non-verbal communication might help communicate that you are actually trying to be helpful.

    I appreciate the effort in actually educating, by linking to a study, rather than sounding insulting. Thank you.
     
  9. tombiasi

    tombiasi Well-Known Member

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    It was never my intent to be insulting I am a retired educator To some people need more education is attacking their intelligence You are quite insightful.
     
  10. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    This was when you started arguing with me. After a specific comment I made about RV fridges and bears. Now you tell me to not focus on the fridge that the argument is about bears and people food in general.

    If you read my posts, you will find that I have not disagreed about risks involved with eating or cooking in a soft sided pup. As for me, I DO eat and cook in mine because it is hard-sided just like my clipper - something I have stated previously in this thread. This has nothing to do with my specific comment about fridges that you have been arguing with me about.

    Maybe reading comprehension on your part should be your focus rather than trying to educate me?

    I learn a lot on forums like this, but not at the hands of someone who bashes me and insults me for "not understanding" when they are the one who has failed to understand what's even being discussed.
     
  11. tombiasi

    tombiasi Well-Known Member

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    It would be pointless to discuss this any more with you.
     
  12. gladecreekwy

    gladecreekwy Well-Known Member

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    Funny, this big debate started with a simple question about eating in your camper. Black vs brown vs grizzly? Living in the middle of grizzly bear country for 25 years I’ve seen a lot of wildlife while camping. It’s very simple. Keep a clean camp, don’t leave food unattended and don’t worry about it.
     
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  13. gladecreekwy

    gladecreekwy Well-Known Member

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    881C9552-E794-4008-BEBD-511CD54F8CAE.jpeg We saw this bear while camping in a fairly remote area in NW Wyoming. She saw us, our camper, our cooler and our dogs. She was completely disinterested in us, concentrating on digging up the roots of plants and eating grubs. She came within about 200 yards before wandering off. Never saw her again
     
  14. BillyMc

    BillyMc Well-Known Member

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    Same species.
     
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  15. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    Kodiak and grizzly bears are considered a subspecies of brown bears. Kodiak bears are isolated enough that they can be identified easily by their location. However, grizzlies and brown bears are pretty much the same thing - brown bears are considered those in coastal areas, grizzlies are those further inland - but their ranges tend to overlap and they interbreed, so the distinction isn't really significant.
     
  16. BillyMc

    BillyMc Well-Known Member

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    While not very common, black bear are seen in more of SC than shown on that map. We keep non-perishables in the PUP all through the camping season. The Fridge is for food only and most of that is frozen when it goes in. Drinks, mostly water, are kept in a cooler so the fridge isn't opened so much. Generally cooking is done in the screen room or grilled. I can lower the curtains to block wind on longer camps, but we typically don't attach the screen room for one or two nights. We don't fry in the PUP, but will boil hot dogs, make coffee, tuna helper, or other non-splattering foods in the event of weather too bad to cook outside.
     
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  17. mark30

    mark30 Member

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  18. Toedtoes

    Toedtoes Well-Known Member

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    Not exactly the same. I'm specifically referring to the fridge. The link just says "no food in tent trailer" but does not specifically include the fridge in its discussion.

    There has never been a hardfast rule about this. I recommend folks contact the campground they will be staying at and ask about keeping food in fridge specifically. It appears that when asked, most times and most places rangers will tell you "that's fine". I suspect it is not stated in the written rules because it can change and vary due to the bears' and visitors' behavior during any given season and they want to be able to say "we didn't say it was OK".

    I do have several Opsak barrier bags - they are very good at keeping the smell contained, just be forewarned when you open the bag. The smell will be 1000 times more intense than when you put it in the bag.

    If I thought it necessary, I'd put food in those and then in the fridge, before I would not use my fridge at all.
     
  19. penny

    penny Well-Known Member

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    I voted, even though we don't have a pop up anymore. We did camp with pop ups when our family was young, and we camped often. Mostly in the NM Gila wilderness area, with 3 kids and usually another family or two. We used our pop up kitchen both for food prep and storage and thought nothing of it. we also cooked outside too, grilling meats. I know there are bears in this wilderness area, but they aren't subject to the hoards of humans and are seldom troublesome in the way that bears who equate campsites with food can be. I'm sure the family dog helped discourage wild animals too.

    that said, the awareness that this site and some others have raised is one of the reasons we went "dark". I know a determined bear can easily enter a travel trailer too, but maybe not as easily. We now camp further from home, and do intend to camp further north west, and probably will be in campgrounds with higher bear activity.

    I want to cook in my camper. A rainy day and a bowl of soup and a book are one of camping life's delights.

    Before we got a hard side camper, an experience our kids had scared them into trading their pop up for a travel trailer. One night a bear came into their camp in the northern part of the state. He ended up under one of the beds of their pop up and was giving them quite a ride as he bumped the bottom of it up and down. they had stored an ice chest under the slide out bed and even though it was empty, the bear was trying to open it. my daughter-in law is really scared of bears, and told my son they were not camping again until they had a trailer.
     
  20. 1380ken

    1380ken Well-Known Member

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    If I am being Educated properly, should I remove the refrigerator from my camper in order to be safe from a bear attack? Could I instead disguise the refrigerator to look like something else? What if I make it look like a washing machine?
     

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