Pop Up market declining or staying the same?

Discussion in 'RV Industry & Camping Related News' started by LaTuFu, Jun 1, 2015.

  1. Minddrive

    Minddrive New Member

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    I love my PUP. It's a 99 Santa Fe. I live on the edge of the Adirondack park and work for an RV dealer.
    The answer to your question is simple but complex. Pop up sales proportionally are way down compared to pre 09. Why? No more Coleman/Fleetwood. We used to sell 100-150 a year, that will never happen again. Doubt any dealer in the country is doing that.

    A couple people were right on with setup and ease of use. The millennials want more instant gratification.

    Most pups are built pretty close to the same now, and don't hold the test of time the oldies do. I'll put my Coleman up against any new Jayco, rock wood, palomino, or Viking and beat them on quality over the next 5 years. There just ok quality, nothing stands out. The Somersets are priced like a 26' travel trailer. Which would you buy for equal money.

    I read in here a couple times about the dealers looking for bigger ticket items, only half true. Remember motor homes are the big ticket and they are not anywhere near pre 09. He didn't try to sell you one of those. Pop ups just are not as savvy with the younger crowd, say under 45. And the boomers are too old to be setting them up. Just because you and I would buy a pup doesn't mean your neighbors will. They don't like to crank. Think about it cars don't even have keys, I can start my truck with an app.

    In certain areas pups just don't sell because of bear restrictions. Or shortened seasons like here in NY dive the market. Even with a park here that has thousands of small primitive sites, trailers still rule. For now, maybe different in the future.

    Again a complex subject, may be different in your area.
     
  2. jbirdt2001@yahoo.com

    [email protected] Active Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Whenever we are driving anywhere we count Rvs on the road and we notice that Pups account for 3%-5% of what we see which we think is a pretty healthy number considering all the other choices. We researched and purchased what we could pay for (not what we could finance) and enjoy our NTU Pup. We like walking through the campground checking out all the Rvs and Tvs but when we return to our site we are grateful for what we have. On a side note I am surprised at how many RVs in our area spend a lot of time parked in a yard and rarely see a campground. PUP [PU] owners are not a minority we are an elite group :)
     
  3. rolisrntex

    rolisrntex New Member

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    I second Mindrive's comment about quality of new PUPs. I actually looked at a brand new Flagstaff earlier this year. After taking a good hard look and kicking the tires, I realized my 99 Coleman was a better built camper. May not have been as pretty as the Flagstaff but overall was more solid.

    Therefore, I told the wife I would rather spend a fraction of the money on my existing camper and fix it up. Overall, I would come out ahead in my opinion. With the kids grown and gone, our PUP is the perfect size for just her and I. Her only requirements are an inside toilet and shower, and we have those.

    If I could figure out how to rig up a permanent electric lift, I would be happier. As it is my cordless drill with a crank adapter does the job.
     
  4. TheHiners

    TheHiners New Member

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    My husband and I have shopped and shopped new and use. Luck out and had a friend that sold us a used popup for a song. The one thing I have noticed was the new popups just not made as sturdy. I don't ike to step in a camper and hear the metal of the floor pop and bend. So long story short I would suggest to anyone to find an older one wether you have to renovate or not. The older pups are just made better. We found plenty of new ones but they wanted so much for them and Flemsy.
     
  5. HappyFamily

    HappyFamily Member

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    This past weekend we were amazed at how many hybrids there were at the campground versus pop-ups. Maybe that is the new direction?
     
  6. tigerflier

    tigerflier Member

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    I would be interested to know what those with a newer pup think about the quality. My 2006 seems quite sturdy but I will never understand using water susceptible materials in anything with a tent and a shower, sink and toilet inside the tent. Even TT's have the cheap materials problem - leave a window open and get rained in and the "wood" is going to swell.

    The idea behind a pup is to be very light weight so "flimsy" may be an inherent characteristic. Is it possible that the older pups are more solid feeling because they are, in fact, made with earlier generation heavier materials?

    I would love to build a pup with aluminum honeycomb side panels, floor and cabinets like we use in aircraft - it would be incredibly light and strong - but it would cost so much few would buy it.
     
  7. adrianpglover

    adrianpglover Well-Known Member

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    2015 Somerset E3 and we love it. Yes it cost a bit to get it, but from what I saw it was night and day difference between how (mainly materials and design) ours was constructed vs other brands on the market. Even comparing it to the last of the E3s made by FTCA looks like CNW did a few upgrades to the line. There have been people who have had some workmanship issues on this line, but we didn't really find any. Even so, there are some areas they could have beefed up a bit instead of going so light/cheap.
     
  8. Thai

    Thai Member

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    A lot of people I know have sold their popups and now have travel trailers. But for us, popups fits our needs and camping lifestyle. We like being able to camp in small private and secluded sites. Not big open fields with other RVs. Our dealer had 3 popups in stock and about a bajillion travel trailers.

    Sent from my SGH-I317 using Tapatalk
     
  9. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member Platinum Supporting Member

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    As with pop-ups and hybrids, size, weight and features of TTs varies a lot. When we had to move to a TT, we did so with no intention of greatly changing the places we camp.
    The TT we picked is about the same size as our 8' pup was when open, so we can use the same sites. It is also lighter than many of the larger pups and hybrids, also a factor for us.
    It will be interesting to see how the pop-up market changes over the next few years. Looking back, it seems it has gone through growth and decline with some regularity. Smaller TTs seem to be more available & popular these days days too. While it was the season to see lots of rental RVs in the area we were, we also saw a fair number of motorcycle size pups (sometimes pulled by cars), TABs, Little Guys and other tear-drop style, some pups of various sizes, as well as some of the larger RVs (not rentals)
     
  10. EvilUncleEarnie

    EvilUncleEarnie New Member

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    My wife and I just returned from camping at Otter Creek in Utah. During the 4 days we were there, we only saw 2 PUPs. The rest were either huge RVs or trailers (of all sizes). We were camping in a tent and decided to get a PUP.

    When we got back we did a search for PUPs and found very few used and even fewer new ones.

    Seems like most places around here like trailers and the huge RV's...
     
  11. tigerflier

    tigerflier Member

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    I wonder if more rural areas would trend toward TTs as there are fewer concerns about tow ratings and trailer weight and no problem finding space to store them, etc. Here's my thinking, I already owned a 3/4 ton diesel truck so tow weight wasn't even a concern for me. My home is on over an acre of land so storing a TT would not be an issue for me either. I chose a pup because I just wanted something that I could pull easily through mountainous and curvy back roads - the pup is perfectfor people wanting to take the road less traveled. I also have a rig for when I want to go where there is no road. [:D]
     

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  12. snc10152011

    snc10152011 New Member

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    WE just purchased a 2015 flagstaff with a slide out dinette so the weight is a little heavier than our 2003 viking (which was stolen). as for the overall quality of the new PUP, I feel is equal to the 2003 other than the bunk end mattresses are much thinner but are now heated. The dealer honestly told us he would rather sell Hybrids than PUP's and that he would do what ever it took to sell off his remaining stock of PUP's. We looked at the new HW but they are small and our 14' box is great in size. we looked at hybrids but over all the PUP had more usable room, large amount of storage, less weight, similar quality finishings, and is much easier to pull. we did get a reasonable deal on the PUP and with our already done mods and planned mods it was a much better choice for us.
     
  13. tonyshell

    tonyshell Member

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    Could some of thedecline in sales stem from Coleman stopping production? Speaking for myself and a few friends we were really disappointed with the brands available when shopping for a replacement for our old one. Nothing in particular wrong with other brands but they didn't have the combination of features we were used to and wanted. I do have some reservations about the build quality of most new RVs. The Somerset was okay but the price was not reasonable.
    Most of the ppl we knew with Coleman jumped to hybrids.
     
  14. tfischer

    tfischer A bad day camping beats a good day at the office Gold Supporting Member

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    Chicken and egg maybe, but Coleman shut down because their popup sales were a fraction of what they once were.
     
  15. bigdouga

    bigdouga New Member

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    We have camped twice since Memorial Day and in both instances our's was the only popup in the campground. Both campgrounds did have a high rate of long term contractor campers. The first campground was either RVs or large TT's and tenters, the second was RV's and TT's.
     
  16. tfischer

    tfischer A bad day camping beats a good day at the office Gold Supporting Member

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    We seldom camp anywhere an RV would fit, and the ones that do tend to be the smaller, older ones.

    The big rigs tend to demand full hookups and end up in a glorified parking lot with clone RVS 10' away on each side.
     
  17. tigerflier

    tigerflier Member

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    My wife speculated that there may be a drop in demand for pups because of a perceived lower privacy/safety factor. If so, I wonder if this would also lead to a lower number of tent campers.... or are the tent campers tent camping in campgrounds because they are entry level "trying it out"? I never tent camped in a campground unless it was to attend another event such as a trail ride etc.
     
  18. tfischer

    tfischer A bad day camping beats a good day at the office Gold Supporting Member

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    Was at my brother's in Wisconsin over this past weekend. Wasn't camping, but saw a decent number of pups in tow and in people's yards. But... none of them looked to be newer than 10 years old, and some much older than that.

    Also saw a good number of huge travel trailers and 5th wheels, which could well have been right off the dealer's lot they looked so shiny and new.

    As an aside, I think it's hilarious that virtually every travel trailer has huge lettering saying something like "ultra lite" or "featherweight" or something. These things weigh over 4000 pounds and can't be pulled by anything but a dedicated truck... that's not "featherweight" in my book.
     
  19. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

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    I think it depends;

    In the Columbus Ohio urban areas there seems to be a demand for poups. It's hard to beat something that can be towed by a mid-size suv or minivan that are so common in the urban areas, and it can be stored in the garage and out of site of the HOA and not require off site storage, and and get OK MPG when towing.

    Cost of ownership is just so much less.
     
  20. buckeyebud

    buckeyebud Member

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    We were in Michigan this past weekend at warren dunes. I've never seen so many pop ups and tents and the place was sold out.
    I think they have 185 sites!!
    We saw very few travel trailers and no big class A's at all
    So I think it just depends on where you camp.
     

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