Pop up suggestions

Discussion in 'Camper Pre-Purchase Questions' started by JeepnGa, Oct 3, 2021.

  1. JeepnGa

    JeepnGa New Member

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    Looking to pick up a popup for weekend kayak trips. Id like to be able to carry the yaks on the roofs. About 200Lbs.

    I really like evolution e1 and 2s but never see them posted when I'm looking

    Any brands to stay away from? Which ones have 1piece aluminum?

    Thx for the help
     
  2. gladecreekwy

    gladecreekwy Well-Known Member

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    whats your tow vehicle ?
     
  3. JeepnGa

    JeepnGa New Member

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    2016 Chevy colorado z71 6cylinder
     
  4. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    . Well if your insistent on using the popup roof to haul your kayaks you are going to want a good solid roof. Stay away from the older Coleman’s with the one piece ABS roof under 2003 I believe. Those roofs were prone to crack and delaminate and in some cases sag. My old Jayco 1990 had a good solid roof with wood supports inside and two aluminum skins a seam in the center. Biggest problem that seam leaked overtime and rot developed in the wood. Many newer popups have little to no support in the roofs it’s just a sandwich of foam thin wood and outer skin with a single support by the AC. I hauled my kayak on my Jayco roof but I wouldn’t dare with my current unit. I don’t know much about the evolution series you were looking at, but believe the skin is fiberglass on the roofs. I don’t know any roofs with a solid one piece aluminum. All aluminum roofs I know have a seam in the center. Manufacturers now a days are going lighter and cheaper so older popups may be solid assuming they didn’t get compromised with rot. All newer popups are slapped together quickly and so they are all built about the same.
     
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  5. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    Might be better to put the yacks on the truck. Just another idea.
     
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  6. JeepnGa

    JeepnGa New Member

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    Thanks for the responses. I've thought about moving the yacks to the truck but due to accessories I am limited on how they could ride.
     
  7. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    Just throwing this out there, but if you or have a buddy who can weld. Perhaps you could make your own rack for the popup that instead of riding on the roof can utilize the actual frame of the popup. kind of like a rack for a pickup truck. This will save the roof from potential damage and put the pressure on the frame where it is stronger.
    There are a lot more physics in play then just weight. You have to account for the pressure you apply to strap the kayak down...the wind pressure hitting the kayak either causing it to move up or down etc.. another option is something like the Sylvan sport go trailer. Although this is more tent on wheels than a traditional popup. However it's built to handle equipment on the roof.
     
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  8. JeepnGa

    JeepnGa New Member

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    Agree. I've pretty much moved on from letting it rest on the roof or even the carrier racks on the roof. I believe, coming up with a rack system is a must. thanks
     
  9. UpNorth-John

    UpNorth-John Member

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    I would consider a full-width roof rack that attaches to the sides of the roof. That's how all the older (1970's-1990's) units worked. That way you are putting the load on a vertical structure (the sides of the roof) rather than on the horizontal part (that will bow, potentially crack and eventually leak). Even in a one-piece (shaped) roof structure (like a Coleman), the more vertical sides will be able to better handle the load and transfer it to the lower walls of the trailer (that are typically much stronger).
    Good luck with you mod.
     
  10. davido

    davido Well-Known Member

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    I have a full-width roof rack that attaches to the sides of the roof, as "UpNorth-John" mentioned. It's very sturdy. But it is rated for 200 pounds. And I never would want to carry exactly as much as it's rated for (or more) on a popup roof. My roof has four latches, that are substantially less study than the roof-top rack. Just sayin'.

    I have carried a kayak on my roof. It works great using the full-width rack. It's a 3-seat Malibu Two XL. But according to specs I've read, its total capacity (500) minus its usable capacity (430) means that the thing weighs 70 pounds by itself. I wouldn't have guessed that much, but it's heavy. Putting two of them on the roof would be 140 pounds, still below the 200 pound limit of the rack I use, and still within your limits. You're sure that your kayaks, two of them, weight 200 pounds combined? That's heavy.

    If the combined weight is anywhere near 200 I would look for another option. Sorry if your tow vehicle is configured such that it cannot accommodate a kayak. Mine is sort of that way too; Ford Broncos (1995) weren't really designed for racks. But it's still not great putting 200 pounds on top of a popup.
     

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