Public sinks

Dave Moz

Member
Jul 15, 2021
54
Keep running into this problem at PA State Parks when we wash our dishes at the utility sinks at the bathhouses. Why do people feel it's OK to just leave their food scraps in the sinks when done washing up?
Stop leaving your garbage in the drains for it either to be washed down and cause a clog and/or have to be cleaned up by the next person. It's really not that hard to do.
Same with the sinks in the bathhouses. If you shave in the sink, clean it up. No one wants to have to clean it up for you.
 

BikeNFish

Super Active Member
Apr 24, 2017
4,512
Maplewood, MN
A couple of weeks ago on my last outing at a campground, I also saw a couple people washing their dishes at the communal drinking water station, leaving water station ground soaked in water, muddy and full of food scraps.

I don't get it.
 

jmkay1

2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah
Oct 10, 2013
7,971
Northern Virginia
Sadly it seems to have gotten worse the last two years and my guess more non camper people are all of the sudden camping and do not know the etiquette. However I wouldn't want to visit their house if they treat the campground sinks like this. It's disgusting and I feel bad for the campground hosts and rangers who are stuck cleaning it all up.
 

Sjm9911

Super Active Member
May 31, 2018
12,566
Nj
Sadly it seems to have gotten worse the last two years and my guess more non camper people are all of the sudden camping and do not know the etiquette. However I wouldn't want to visit their house if they treat the campground sinks like this. It's disgusting and I feel bad for the campground hosts and rangers who are stuck cleaning it all up.
They probably still live at home and mom and dad clean up for them. Unfortunately, a lot of younger people now a days do not learn how to clean. I see it at work, and stuff like washing dishes, moping, wiping down a table has to be taught to 25 year olds.
 

jmkay1

2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah
Oct 10, 2013
7,971
Northern Virginia
They probably still live at home and mom and dad clean up for them. Unfortunately, a lot of younger people now a days do not learn how to clean. I see it at work, and stuff like washing dishes, moping, wiping down a table has to be taught to 25 year olds.
True! My boss went to orientation for her daughter's college and that was the first thing they told parents was to please teach your kids how to take care of themselves before they start school. It's sad it even needed to be mentioned. One would have thought you would teach them very early in life.
 

davido

Super Active Member
Jul 17, 2014
1,424
At one campground where we shared communal spigots, one camper arrived and tied a bar of soap in a nylon to the spigot adjacent to the rest room facility. Nope! CG host took care of that. I'm not filling my drinking water jug at a spigot where someone I don't know has tied pantyhose and sticky soap.
 

Dave Moz

Member
Jul 15, 2021
54
Most PA State Park campgrounds have a communal spigot in each loop. Yesterday a couple was riding their bikes and looking at spots for their next trip. The spigot was between our spot and the next (but far enough away from either spot to not really make a difference.)
The woman said "Oh this spot would be great! We could hook a hose up to the pump and run it to our site."
The man looked at her and said, "No. The pump is for everyone to use for drinking water not for one site to use for just their own needs, and definitely not for doing dishes at our site."

I felt like standing up and applauding.
 

UpNorth-John

Member
Sep 4, 2010
96
I've always washed my dishes in my own site, whether tenting, Rv'ing, backpacking. Just bring dishpans for wash, rinse and sanitize (how the Boy Scouts do it). When you're done, the water goes down drains in the campgrounds (or "arced" into the woods for rustic camping). Never had any issues or complaints. Some (but not all) campsites have grease traps for the really dirty stuff (in the campfire ring/pit is the typical alternative, or the trash).
 

tombiasi

Super Active Member
Sep 1, 2012
6,781
Northwestern New Jersey
I've always washed my dishes in my own site, whether tenting, Rv'ing, backpacking. Just bring dishpans for wash, rinse and sanitize (how the Boy Scouts do it). When you're done, the water goes down drains in the campgrounds (or "arced" into the woods for rustic camping). Never had any issues or complaints. Some (but not all) campsites have grease traps for the really dirty stuff (in the campfire ring/pit is the typical alternative, or the trash).
The campfire pit is for campfires.
 

Susan Premo

Super Active Member
Nov 5, 2020
1,130
Minnesota
I only washed dishes in a campground sink once, it was my first camping trip, I noticed other people washing theirs at their sites. I hadn't even thought to bring those things, live and learn quickly
 

Sneezer

Super Active Member
Aug 8, 2015
3,081
DFW, TX
I think a lot is people who never camped at all. Used to be you tent camped for a bit, then moved into a pup or small TT and went from there. Now we have folks that never set foot in a campground getting RVs, and they don't have a clue on proper campground etiquette, let alone LNT principles.

I see it often as well at parks - even washing dishes in the bathroom sinks. Got worse over the last couple seasons too.
 

Patrick w

Super Active Member
Aug 13, 2021
763
I've done all of the above. Except the water spigot thing. But I wipe all my pans down first, and that all goes to trash. I wash into a bucket and the bucket gets tossed in the tree line.
 




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