Rivet or Bolt on stepper door connection to swing arm

Discussion in 'Mystery Parts' started by OnlyINMonroe, Feb 15, 2021.

  1. OnlyINMonroe

    OnlyINMonroe New Member

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    Does anyone know what kind of rivet or bolt housing is needed to connect the swing arm to the stepper door? Mine broke it seems like a threaded piece to n the inside? I don’t think a standard rivet would work as there has to be some movement. I would prefer a standard rivet so I wouldn’t have to open the door assembly to repair.
     

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  2. Fish N Farm

    Fish N Farm Well-Known Member

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    Well that thing looks like it is threaded by my old tired eyes. Can you get the one on the other side out and check it. I have inserted the chuck end of drills that fit tight then mic'ed them get a size. A dial caliper works good for that. Ok I just looked that again and I see they are both gone. If you are not familiar with looking at nut and bolt sizes use the end of a drill that fits in the drill chuck and and get a measurement when you measure the bolt it will be a different size because the threads are cut into the piece it screws into. If the threads in the part in the door are ruined you could put a crush nut in there. I am guessing that the screw has a shoulder to ride in the hinge support. There are several Coleman guys on her that can direct you to the parts source they use. One of them will see this and help you more.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2021
  3. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Well-Known Member Silver Supporting Member

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    A macro photo of the nut would help. Hopefully, you have a scrounge bucket with spare hardware parts. Find a bolt that fits into the threaded nut. If not, buy three or four close to the diameter, to see what fits. Realize that there are different thread pitches for the same diameter bolt. Don't force the bolt in and cross thread the nut. Finesse over force, I say. You may need a machine tap to clean the threads up on the nut. They can be damaged as the old bolt is working its way out. Then measure the width of the arm and the diameter of the hole in the arm. Most hardware stores have a "specialty" fastener section, that you may be able to find a shoulder bolt to fit the arm and the threaded nut. There's always McMaster-Carr for difficult to find hardware.
     
  4. OnlyINMonroe

    OnlyINMonroe New Member

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    These are the pieces sheared off.

     

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  5. Raycfe

    Raycfe Waterford Ct.

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    I used a "tee nut". without the teeth to repair Coleman steps.
    Screen Shot 2021-02-15 at 8.12.37 PM.png Use stainless steel if you can find them. And if you only find ones with teeth .......bend the teeth flat.
     
  6. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Well-Known Member Silver Supporting Member

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    Not sure how these are connected to the first pictures.
     
  7. theseus

    theseus CamperMod Addict - Thinking about the Dark Side... Silver Supporting Member

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    You will have to take the outer skin off the door to fix it I think. Then you will need large head aluminum rivets to put the skin back on. I used some similar to these in my repair. If you can find tri-folding, those are the ones to get.
     
  8. OnlyINMonroe

    OnlyINMonroe New Member

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    Here is a closer pic. So it appears I may need to pry open the skin. Rivets to replace and then how do you connect it back?
     

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  9. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Well-Known Member Silver Supporting Member

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    Where the arm attaches, is it threaded or not? Give us a shot of the front of the step. I'm assuming you drill out the row of rivets on both sides of the step, do your repair, then use pop rivets to reinstall the sides.
     
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  10. OnlyINMonroe

    OnlyINMonroe New Member

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    so the tee nut inside the skin then screw what into the tee nut? Is there a type of screw or something? Is loctite needed?
     
  11. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Well-Known Member Silver Supporting Member

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    Look at post #3. It's called a "shoulder bolt". Pink or blue Loctite would work.
     
  12. OnlyINMonroe

    OnlyINMonroe New Member

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    These pieces are the rivets that were connecting the swing arm assembly to the stepper door. I say rivets because they look to be rivets but there were some kind of threaded connector sticking out of the door where they were connected to or located. My confusion lies in trying to figure out what they are. I’m trying to find the best part to replace them with I see the connection piece could be a tee nut which makes sense but the shoulder bolt or rivet is what I am trying to figure out. Shoulder bolt makes sense but when the piece sheared off where did the threaded part go
     
  13. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Well-Known Member Silver Supporting Member

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    They may not have sheared off. They may have backed out.
    Edit: OK. I just went back and reviewed the post. Now I wonder if "they" put a tee nut in the door, basically for a spacer and a shoulder for the arm. Then "they" just used an aluminum pop rivet, through the tee nut center, to hold the arm on the tee nut. With time the retaining pop rivet head wore in to. Was there a steel washer under the pop rivet head, between it and the arm?
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2021
  14. mv520

    mv520 Active Member

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    Last edited: Feb 22, 2021
  15. OnlyINMonroe

    OnlyINMonroe New Member

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  16. OnlyINMonroe

    OnlyINMonroe New Member

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    That sounds like a possibility I am wondering why a rivet would still go through shoulder bolt. No I cannot recall a washer surrounding it
     
  17. Fish N Farm

    Fish N Farm Well-Known Member

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  18. OnlyINMonroe

    OnlyINMonroe New Member

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    Thanks. I am wondering if anyone knows what Coleman used originally for that type of connection. While the rivet inserted into the nut theory sounds correct based on evidence wonder if anyone knows what the original part is just want to be sure I have seen other post in other repair forum on here and the pictures are no longer available and descriptions they seem to have used random parts from Lowe’s or Home depot
     
  19. theseus

    theseus CamperMod Addict - Thinking about the Dark Side... Silver Supporting Member

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  20. mv520

    mv520 Active Member

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    See the first 2 links in post #14 above
     

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