RoadID - I really like this product.

Discussion in 'Camping for the Medically/Physically Challenged' started by nancyanddan, Mar 31, 2012.

  1. nancyanddan

    nancyanddan Active Member

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    Along the same line as meds, the RoadID is a great way to have your medication list, contacts, blood type, allergies, and medical history with you at all times. You can get RoadID as a wrist or ankle bracelet, a dog tag, or shoe pouch. In case of an accident a first responder would have access to this information and could immediately call your contact person as well as be aware of any medical issues you might have.

    A few years ago my son Kelly - a serious bicycle racer - started wearing the wrist ID and recommended I do the same. Though I don't engage in bike racing (or other similar sports), I do hike, go for long walks, and X-C ski in the winter.

    I opted for the interactive version, whereby I filled out my information on their secure website. This info was then linked to my serial number and PIN, engraved on the small plate on the bracelet. Also engraved is my name, DH's name and phone number, and the phone number for RoadID as well as the web url so a first responder can immediately access all important contact and medical information.

    Here's the link to the website: http://www.roadid.com

    Please note I have no affiliation with RoadID; I simply believe in the product and consider it cheap insurance should something happen where I could not speak for myself.
     
  2. beemerboy

    beemerboy New Member

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    Be careful about depending on having a "first responder" call your contact. Most of the time, when we get to a call there is no time to call someone - it's usually "scoop and scoot" and let the hospital worry about calling contacts.

    A neighboring department got into big trouble when a firefighter took it on herself to call the family and tell them that their son died in a car crash. We do not allow a fire fighter, EMT or medic to call the patients contact.

    Most of the poorer fire departments don't have the equipment to access a website for someones medical info in route to the hospital and even if they did, they would probably be at the hospital by the time the info came up.

    The first responder may notify the hospital that there is a medic alert bracelet and the info on it but that's about it.
     
  3. nancyanddan

    nancyanddan Active Member

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    I hear what you're saying, beemerboy. And I do agree with "scoop and scoot." But I would think that enroute to the hospital it would behoove a first responder to call the RoadID phone number, give them the serial number and pin, and find out right away if the accident victim has diabetes or a serious allergy or other medical condition that could be life-threatening if it were not treated immediately.

    The firefighter who called the victim's family and told them their loved one died was way out of line. It would have been far better had she said there was an accident and told them the name of the hospital where the victim was taken.

    Back in the early 1980's while I was living in Lompoc, CA I joined the Search and Rescue Team. We were certified as EMT II and in a few of the incidents we were called out to the victim(s) had no id, were unconscious, and thus neither we nor the Doctors at the hospital had any way of knowing the medical issues or how to reach the person's family. One case stands out: by the time the family had been found and got to the hospital, their son had passed away. this was almost a full day after the accident occurred. He was semi-conscious for a couple of hours, and then went downhill rapidly. I don't recall all the details of this particular case, but the family was extremely upset that they had not been able to be with the young man while he was still alive. [:(]

    A number of testimonials have been posted to the RoadID website, many of them from first responders - paramedics and firefighters - who fully endorse the product: http://www.roadid.com/Testimonial/TestimonialList.aspx?TID=85
     
  4. Leyster

    Leyster Revelstoke, B.C.

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    My late MIL had the medical alert bracelet and it did no good at all. The paramedics that came to the house noticed it and wrote down all info that was needed. Get to the ER and they were about to administer morphine for the pain which she was highly allergic to. We got them to check and yep she was surprise .....ER team never even looked for the bracelet and we don't know if the paramedics passed on the info or not. Next day she is out of ER but transferred to the big city hospital for an operation. Her medic alert bracelet has now dissapeared and again they were going to administer morphine for the pain but we got that stopped. That is the good parts of her hospital adventure, I could go on with more of the horror story and about hospital staff but all I want to point out is that the ID is only good if someone actually looks at it.
     
  5. beemerboy

    beemerboy New Member

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    In our town the hospital is about 10 minutes away and if the driver puts his foot in it it could be about 7 minutes. If the patient is in a bad way, there is no time to sit in the driveway and call and the medics/emt's are pretty busy in back of the ambulance.

    Around here the medics and ambulance have wireless communications with the hospital but no web access.

    I could understand if there is an extended distance like in the mid west farm country or on the side of the road in the desert where the hospital is an extended distance away. but in New England and probably most cities the hospital is only minutes away.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm in favor of any means to get any and all info to the medic and the hospital.
    I keep a list of meds by each exterior door, one each in my car, my office desk at the fire station and my moms house.

    A year and a half ago my ICD (defibrillator) did it's job. After it shocked me five times I had time to call my doctor to send a report to him to read. About the time I hung up with him sparky decided to remind me that its still working. I called 911 while sparky was still shocking me. When the shocks stopped (5 more hits) I called the doctor that I was going to the hospital just as the medic and the fire department (that I belong to) showed up, so the doctor was able to talk to the medic to coordinate treatment.

    From the time the first shock to the time the medic showed up was about 15 minutes and we wasted no time to get to the hospital.
    =====
    It would have better if she left it to the state police to do the notification. This is company policy.

    In a situation like this we have to wait for the state medical examiner to investigate and transport the body to the state medical labs for autopsy and this could take an hour or more at the scene and it would be very difficult if hysterical family were there.

    Again, I have no problem with RoadId. just don't depend on it.
     
  6. nancyanddan

    nancyanddan Active Member

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    What won't they think of next:

    [​IMG]

    Facebook post from the RoadID folks: "Forgot to include the pending launch of our Rodent ID line in our latest newsletter. Coming soon."

    [LOL] [LOL] [LOL] [LOL]
     
  7. austinm48

    austinm48 http://s1174.photobucket.com/albums/r604/austinm48

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  8. fritz_monroe

    fritz_monroe New Member

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    I bought one when I started running. I made sure I got it in a bright color so that it isn't easily missed. Some of them look just look like a watch band and I'm sure that they would be overlooked in an emergency.
     
  9. nancyanddan

    nancyanddan Active Member

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    I agree about the bright colors, fritz_monroe. Initially I got the Wrist ID Sport in blue with the velcro closure, and recently upgraded to the Wrist ID Elite in Red:

    [​IMG]
    (photo above grabbed from their website; this isn't my info.)

    It's more comfortable and easy to spot. In fact, while on vacation last summer at Tahoe we stopped in a Starbuck's in Truckee. I saw a woman in line who was wearing the Wrist ID in yellow; we immediately struck up a conversation about the benefits of RoadID. :)
     
  10. CommaHolly

    CommaHolly New Member

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    if I was in a car accident, I'm not sure I'd WANT the EMT's to do more than their job,,,,,which is to stabilize me and get me to the hospital as fast as it is safe to do so. I would think that hospitals would be the proper ones to call my loved ones. Besides, if it's a bad accident, there's no guarantee that I'd even be staying at that hospital. They might send me elsewhere to a hospital that can handle my injury properly. What good is it going to do for the EMT to call my husband, tell him I'm going to hospital A and then by the time he gets there, I'm at hospital B?

    I'm also not sure I want my loved one's phone numbers on my wrist. Who KNOWS who could get that number for some nefarious purpose. If crooks can steal your debit card PIN number by watching you at a POS, then they could surely take pictures of the phone numbers on my wrist.
     
  11. fritz_monroe

    fritz_monroe New Member

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    It isn't all about contacts.

    Mine has that I'm allergic to penicillin and e-mycin, I'd have any other allergies as well. I sure want a first responder to know this information. It very well can mean that they can do their job successfully.
     
  12. nancyanddan

    nancyanddan Active Member

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    [{:)]
    Ditto, fritz_monroe. Makes good sense to me. :)
     
  13. bigdad

    bigdad Active Member

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    The ID are good to have as for calling a love one that's for the staff at the Emergency Room or the law enforcement to do in the 20 year that i spent in Fire/Rescue we did not notify the love one unless a love one was there. in the county i lived in back in Va we had 5 Rescue and 11 Fire dept and are Run time would vary.
     
  14. nancyanddan

    nancyanddan Active Member

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    Woo-hoo! My 7-year old twin grandchildren, Jackson and Avery, are going to be SO excited when they find out their RoadIDs came in the mail today:

    [​IMG]

    We ordered them each an extra band, too, in case they feeling like changing the colors. :)
     

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