Roof Rebuild Inquiries

ThaBhill

Member
Mar 30, 2022
10
SE Wisconsin
Looking for insight on the following

- When prepping the inside of the exterior roof skin, is it necessary to remove all the old adhesive prior to rebuilding/gluing new components the roof?

- I plan on using gorilla glue to adhere the outer roof skin and new interior ceiling material to the framework and new insulation. Can someone please offer insight regarding rolling vs troweling the glue on as I have read of it done both ways.

- Has anyone used gorilla tape on the interior center seam or is eternabond tape the only way to go here?

All help is greatly appreciated!
 

csharpdev

Member
May 30, 2015
17
I think the more old adhesive you remove the better the bond will be...removing all would be ideal but may or may not be necessary. I'm certainly not an adhesive expert and I didn't reuse the skin when I rebuilt my roof.
 

bondebond

Super Active Member
Aug 14, 2008
2,318
I have always found the best chance of success through removing as much of the old adhesive as possible. Old adhesive is a ticking time bomb for longevity concerns.

I can't say on how to apply Gorilla glue specifically, but I've seen good results when rolling on adhesive with super low nap or foam type rollers. I think it can make a more even distribution as long as you watch your roller edges oozing out excess adhesive.

For the interior side, I wouldn't rely on something somewhat designed to be removed (duct tape, regardless of brand). If you're going to use something, I would go with what is designed to be a permanent seal, the Eternabond. The sealant is thick enough it might impart a raised area along the seam but I can't say I hate the idea of a slope that leads water away from a center seam. It may not do anything of the sort, depending on the rest of the ceiling and roof come together.

And a bit of insight into my use of Gorilla tape, I love it for various uses. I used it to build a survival tarp shelter one time for a fun, weekend backyard project. Three years later, it is still serviceable but the heat of storage has allowed the adhesive to stretch and give, even pull away in areas. That's on a tarp that is by nature flexible and folded whereas a roof does not fold and flex. But seeing the heat soften up the adhesive to that point would make me not want to use it in the manner you describe if you are truly interested in keeping water out for many years to come. I tend to overbuild in situations I don't want to revisit.
 

ThaBhill

Member
Mar 30, 2022
10
SE Wisconsin
Thanks for the insight. Looks like I've got a tad more work ahead of me prior to reassembly. Any recommendations on what to remove the old adhesive with? I've read that acetone is a go to but don't have a respirator on hand, looking for something a little less caustic that I can use in the garage. If acetone is the way to go so be it though. Thanks again.
 
Apr 17, 2022
12
Thanks for the insight. Looks like I've got a tad more work ahead of me prior to reassembly. Any recommendations on what to remove the old adhesive with? I've read that acetone is a go to but don't have a respirator on hand, looking for something a little less caustic that I can use in the garage. If acetone is the way to go so be it though. Thanks again.
We are only rebuilding the side boards on our 2004 Rockwood Freedom 2270. But we had to do a lot of scraping because we decided to reuse the aluminum skins/siding.

We used mostly Goo-Be-Gone and a putty knife for the scraping. For the initial removing of the water damaged board, we used the putty knive and a hammer. The goo be gone seemed to do the job, but it did involve a few hours of scraping. Good Luck!
 




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