Stabilizer jack placements?

Discussion in 'Stabilizing Your Camper' started by Dude, Nov 30, 2014.

  1. Dude

    Dude [URL=http://s1176.photobucket.com/user/semperfi2tl

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    Have decided to add sicissor jacks to the pup, and need clarity why the jacks are always placed for access from the sides and never from the front or back.
     
  2. rabird

    rabird Howdy!

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    I'm guessing, the main beam runs front to back, mounting bracket centered in main beam means access from side. mounting bracket to big to mount 90 degrees to main beam for rear access. Too far to the rear and they may drag the ground on occasion.

    I think I'd want em at 45 degrees but that would require welding.
     
  3. Dude

    Dude [URL=http://s1176.photobucket.com/user/semperfi2tl

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    I have custom made my stabilizer with a 3 1/2 " angle iron bracket to cradle the frame, so it can be mounted either way. My thinking on these being mounted sideways, is it more likely to get bent getting hit from the side and not work properly than if it was hit head on.
    More than anything I'm looking for a logical reason why they are always mounted for access from the side.

    Thx bupkis, your idea at a 45 degree isn't a bad idea.
    [​IMG]


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  4. ghacker

    ghacker Active Member

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    Part of the reason they are oriented the way they are may be that they are the last thing to do setting up the PUP and the 1st thing taking it down. The bunkend ends will always be deployed so more likely to hit your head. Another factor could be the foot pad is perpendicular to the long side of the PUP which would provide the best stability in windy conditions.
     
  5. Dude

    Dude [URL=http://s1176.photobucket.com/user/semperfi2tl

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    Very good points Ghacker. I didn’t even think about it stabilizing under wind conditions. That makes good since.

    As for stabilizing, shouldn't they be down before pulling the bunks out?
     
  6. easternshoreboy

    easternshoreboy New Member

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    I have a 2011 R Vision HTT. The stabilizers are mounted 45 degrees. I like this. It's the first TT that was this way. It's my fifth camper BTW.


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  7. Rukachu

    Rukachu New Member

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    Yes, you should always make sure your jacks are and your rig is level FIRST, before starting setup.
     
  8. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    Stabilizing order seems to depend on brand. Leveling always is first, we do side-to-side before unhitching, since we use Lynx blocks; then front-to-back, once we unhitch.
    With the Coleman Cobalt, as with most - if not all - more recent Colemans, the roof is raised before stabilizing. Then we pull the bunks out. We usually, we crank the stabs almost down before raising the roof, just in case someone gets ahead of the other and steps in side before the stabs are snugged to the ground. No wheelies that way.

    As far as angle of installation, we were interested to find that front stabs on the Retro TT are not at quite the same angle. It looks like they are just a bit different to avoid interference with the crank from underfloor mechanics.
     
  9. bigpoppa

    bigpoppa unbreakable...... is that a challenge?

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    Apologies for the noob question, other than the increased adjustability of the scissor jacks, are there any other advantages?

    On my pup the old school finger biters extend out on an angle away from the trailer. With the scissor jacks they drop straight down. (I'm not an engineer, but I did pass middle school geometry with a flying c) wouldn't the location of the stabilizer pads being further outboard provide better stability? The couple inches difference in the landing location of the stab pad is probably insignificant, but functional stability is the primary purpose.
     
  10. Dude

    Dude [URL=http://s1176.photobucket.com/user/semperfi2tl

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    Thx everyone for your input, we have really leaned allot from all the advise given on this forum.
    We did manage to get the jacks mounted today as will as get the top set and lift system put back in. Allot of work for one day, but we got it done.
    One thing we didn't take into consideration, was how close the lift tubes would come to the foot on the jacks. Looking back I wished we would have put a bit of an angle on the mounting bracket to the jack. so in stead we added a spacer to the outside edge and allowed it to clear everything. 100% happy with how they work. Not bad for 4 scissor jacks fund at the junk trasher hunt for 20 bucks. Lol.
    Back
    [​IMG]

    Front
    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  11. JimmyM

    JimmyM Well-Known Member

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    Scissor jacks provide less stability for lateral movement than the swing down type.
    [​IMG]
    Unless you have diagonal supports.
    [​IMG]

    Of course there are the crank down type that if mounted diagonally will provide lateral stability. But some also have stabilizer arms built in.
    Regular:
    [​IMG]

    With stabilizer arms:
    [​IMG]
     
    Mamie likes this.
  12. Jayko

    Jayko Jayco 141J aka Big Bertha

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    On our jayco we bring down the corner mounted jacks (factory installed) prior to pulling out the bunk ends.

    We do it in this order to ensure that if the bunks are out, and someone goes into the pup, the box is stable.

    Not sure if this is right or wrong by anyone's stamdards, but seems to be good logic that the box is stable when someone can access the interior.
     
  13. Dude

    Dude [URL=http://s1176.photobucket.com/user/semperfi2tl

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    All good points guys. With 7 points of contact to the ground from the trailer, I personally feel any of these stabilizers will work. Especially with the wills chucked.


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  14. pandpcamper

    pandpcamper Lifetime camper, newer to pup

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    Was hoping to replace our old stabs with scissor jacks since they are so difficult to bring down, but not sure if right thing to do.
     
  15. Dude

    Dude [URL=http://s1176.photobucket.com/user/semperfi2tl

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    I personally like the scissor jacks. I have never liked the Stab jacks. There hard to get to and locking and unlocking is a pain. Crank Scissor jacks down isn’t as fast as I would like them, but they perform very well. I have used a drill to get those up and down fast, but you need to be careful not to run them to fast. I welded a socket to an old wood swivel bit and use the swivel crank to run them up and down, Works great.
     

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