The one thing you wish someone had told you.

Discussion in 'First Time & New Camper Owners' started by sdclaw, Jan 14, 2020.

  1. GreyFox

    GreyFox Well-Known Member

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    If you're not going to use a drill to raise / lower your BAL Leveler ...

    [​IMG]

    ... then do yourself a favour and reduce the amount of effort required to turn the BAL drive screw with the supplied wrench by extending it's length, thereby reducing the amount of torque needed to turn the screw. :D

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Lorankins

    Lorankins New Member

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    How important is it, really, to level a pop up trailer? They're so small does really have any affect on them? This is an honest question as we just got our first pup.
     
  3. Bowman3d

    Bowman3d Well-Known Member

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    Mostly need it level for the fridge to work correctly. Doesn’t have to be perfect but as close as possible. Plus I imagine if it’s way out of level it might put an inordinate amount of stress on the roof supports.
     
  4. Lorankins

    Lorankins New Member

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    I had actually thought about the fridge with leveling. The supports I hadn't thought of. Thank you so much for the help. Should we put those leveling blocks under the leveling feet or just the tires?
     
  5. giadiep

    giadiep Active Member

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    That most of my life will be working behind a desk staring at multiple computer screens in between the few times I get to take my family out for adventures.
     
  6. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    What pup do you have? Most level with blicks or the bal leveler under the tires , so side to side, then level front to back. There are no leveling feet. There are stabilizers, for stabilizing the camper so it dosen't tip over. They are not ment to level the camper. All things , propane, water, drains fridge work best if leveled. Also better for sleeping.
     
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  7. Lorankins

    Lorankins New Member

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    Thank you. We just got a 95 Jayco 1206. So nothing under the stabilizers and a BAL leveler is best for these little guys?
     
  8. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, Blocks or the bal under the low tire. And you can use blocks under the levelers for stability on mushy ground or uneven terrain, but they are not ment for leveling. I use small planks under my stabs.
     
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  9. Bowman3d

    Bowman3d Well-Known Member

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    DO NOT use the stabilizers to level the trailer. You can bend the frame. Level first then put stabilizers down, snug to the ground then maybe just a touch, and I mean just a touch to stabilize the trailer
     
  10. Lorankins

    Lorankins New Member

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    Excellent advice gladly accepted. Thank you bunches
     
  11. FARfetched

    FARfetched Active Member

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    If it's off much at all, the door won't fit together properly. I've found that if you raise the door side just a little higher than level (an inch or less), everything fits perfectly and any rain runs off the other side, away from the door.

    @GreyFox, the Starflyer isn't terribly heavy. It doesn't take a lot of effort to crank the stock ratchet, it's just tedious. Having said that, I have a 20V DeWalt driver that would probably do the job. Failing that, I have a couple of heavy-duty electric DeWalts that would just need an outlet. The in-laws used them as portable winch motors when they had chicken houses. When they failed, they ended up in my garage, where I would Frankenstein a working drill out of other leftovers if it needed more than new brushes.
     
  12. MNTCamper

    MNTCamper Active Member

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    I find I need to level my trailer (side to side) about 30-40% of the time. The rest of the time it is close enough and we just sleep with our heads at the high end. For leveling, I just have a single piece of 2x8 with a bevel cut on one end that we back over. I have never needed to adjust it more that 1.5", 2" at most(have some 1/2" ply for the stabs). We camp in established campgrounds, though almost all the time without utilities. In general. they are all fairly decent side to side level, or you can at least find a good spot in the space that works side to side. Front to back is another thing, we have had to do a great deal of leveling there, quite often, but that is easy with the tongue jack, so no big deal. We are always on propane on our fridge and have never had an issue in regards to being level, it always works
     
  13. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    Ill agree most sites i had were pretty good. Some of the more primitive ones may need more leveling. Even some of the full hook ups as there built for larger TT or bigger. Most i had to go up was 4 inches to facilitate the sewer gook up and the ellectrical hook up. I could have put it in a more level spot bit then wouldn't be able to use eaither the sewer or electeical. I more carry the extra wood for flats. If you have a hill on the side of a highway and you need height i find its best to have it on hand. And this was from a flat without a trailor. I got bigger tires and rims, got a flat and the jack didn't reach. Now had to scramble to find wood rocks to make up the diffrance. Never again!
     
  14. Econ

    Econ Well-Known Member

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    Add this to your signature for better answers in the future.

    Walk into your camper without the stabilizers down. The floor shakes. That is what the stabs are for.

    My philosophy is KISS, keep it simple stupid. We are minimalist. For leveling use
    https://www.amazon.com/Tri-Lynx-000...eywords=leveling+links&qid=1581681712&sr=8-12

    We have developed a system and get within a half degree of side to side level the first time.

    My Dometic Refrig has to be within 3 degrees of level its side to side and 6 degrees of its front to back level for the ammonia to flow.
     
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  15. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    @Econ - we're die-hard Lynx block users too. We get it right the first time , using gauging by the bubble on the level, somewhere in the 90%+ range. Once in a while, we run into a dip or rise that throws things off a bit.
    We now have 4 sets of blocks, plus the caps and chocks (We also have a BAL chock.) Using the blocks under the stabilizers on soft ground is great, even with sand pads ours have sunk a bit. In some sites, having the blocks under the stabilizers also reduces the amount of cranking, and keeps the stabs from needing to be extended way out. With the style we had on our second pup and have on the TT, they are more stable if we don't have to crank them to the max We've had a few sites where one or more stabs would have been off the ground even at the max.
    We also use a stack under the tongue jack, both the keep extension to a good amount, and to reduce cranking. (We have a manual jack.)
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020 at 10:51 AM
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  16. Econ

    Econ Well-Known Member

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    @kitphantom

    We do not camp on bottom land or pastures. Most of our camping has been on asphalt or packed gravel fines. We did camp about 200' off the shore once. We have never experienced "soft" ground. The stabs do have sand pads.

    My KISS philosophy. Why do you camp? Hopefully for relaxation and enjoy nature. How do you do that? By temporarily uncomplicating your life and brain allowing relaxation. The relaxed mind enjoys and appreciates nature. Complex and Complicated = stressed brain. Unless it's Bach.<GG>

    My Stab crank. It's a simple piece of steel that causes no worries. Doubtful it will ever break. It's dedicated to the camper so you won't forget it. No need to remember to charge it. No worries about breaking it. No need to search for 120VAC to recharge it. No lost sockets. Minimal storage space. Not heavy. Simple to operate. Gives a little exercise the body craves. Safe. Not complicated. No stress. Relaxed mind.

    We carry a small garden trowel To solve severe sloping problems. Never have used it.
     
  17. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    One thing that has always been part of our camping philosophy is to keep tabs on what we need, want, use, and what can be left behind, needs to be acquired, and/or always packed. Even after 5 years with our current camper, we have been reassessing things over the winter. We try to keep things as simple as possible, as complicated as need be. We can use the camper in lieu of a hotel for visiting, dry camp an hour or so away from the nearest town for up to a week+, and stay in campsites with water/electric or FHU - sometimes all of those variations on the same trip.
    Some things that we find we need on a trip just get added to the supplies once we have needed them. e.g., needing extra Lynx for under the stabs became apparent when we did one of the Colorado PUP Rallies - we had to adjust one stab a few times because it ended up without anything except the sand pad. When we stayed in Trailer village at South Rim GCNP. Courtenay ended up joining a few wyes (good thing the store in the park had them) so we could get water (no water hookup on that camper) from a spigot a few inches off the ground. I'm thinking even attaching a hose for city water would have been a challenge in that campsite. Those have traveled with us ever since, never been used for the same situation, but for others.

    We camp mostly in public campgrounds in the 4 Corners states, and a few KOAs or private or concessionaire-run campgrounds, where the site can be anything from grass to gravel of various types to asphalt to concrete. In some places with asphalt, they require the bigger rigs to have pads under their stabilizer/jacks, since asphalt can soften in the heat. (North Rim of Grand Canyon is one place I've encountered it.) We use the Lynx there too, even though we're probably not heavy enough to sorry about it.
    While we may need to go to a motorized jack one of these days, for now manual works well. (The race will be to see whether my bad shoulder wears out before I stop solo camping.)
    We actually camp to explore places, and enjoy the outdoors, so the balance between simple and a few extra comforts or conveniences has always been there, from tents to popups to the small TT. (It's actually smaller than some of the larger pups and HTTs.)
     

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  18. Dan Wilson

    Dan Wilson Active Member

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    No.
     
  19. Dan Wilson

    Dan Wilson Active Member

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    Welcome from somewhere Wisconsin. My advice is always do a walk around before driving off and whenever you stop for gas.
     
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  20. Orchid

    Orchid Sharp Shootin' Grandma

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    Being level is at least as important, or possibly more so, than on a bigger trailer. Many reasons.

    Not being level will put undo stress on the lift system
    You must be level for the door to seat properly
    Being level is important for bed slides to not be stressed and support properly
    Propane appliances will not function properly without being level

    There may be more reasons that I'm not thinking of right off the top of my head, but yes, it's a very big deal with pop ups. Very important and so easy to accomplish.
     
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