Thinking of a new TV

Discussion in 'Going to the DARK SIDE' started by NorcrossFlyer, Jan 3, 2019.

  1. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,850
    Likes Received:
    841
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    Here's a good place to see mileage for others:

    http://www.fuelly.com/car/ram/2500
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2019
  2. RockyRoo

    RockyRoo Just because you CAN doesn't mean you SHOULD

    Messages:
    6,530
    Likes Received:
    130
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    OK, now that we have had the discussion about diesel and gas and 1/2 vs 3/4 let's go back to the original questions.

    Truck handles sway OK but you can feel the trailer stressing it, how do you fix? This is the 1/2 ton frame being stressed by the forces of the trailer. You don't NEED a 3/4 ton truck, but you will be much happier once you tow with it the first time.

    Gas mileage sucks and small tank has you stopping every 10 minutes for gas, how do we fix this? Unfortunately you won't gain any range with a 3/4 ton gasser. Last I checked they all came with 25-30 gallon tanks and from my experience with my 15 Chevy 2500 6.0 pulling my Roo the gas mileage was right on par with my 13 5.3 liter. The 3/4 will pull better and more confidently without working anywhere near as hard but the gas mileage will still suck at 7-10 mpg. For the record I loved my 2500 6.0, the frequent gas stops were often timed perfectly with potty stops.

    Kids complain about the back seats, how do we fix? The only truck I know of with recliners is the Dodge Megacab. That said, check the latest generations of crew cabs, they all have nicer back seats than what yours has. My 13 Chevy back seats sucked too, my 15 3/4 and 16 1 ton seats are much much much better.

    So how do we fix the gas mileage problem? Diesel is one option, albeit a fairly pricey one. Also keep in mind you have the DEF issue to deal with. All that said, I love my 16 Duramax and am not interested in getting rid of it even if we do downsize in trailers. Pulling my 13000 pound 5er I get 12-14 mpg even in the mountains and it RARELY down shifts out of 6th gear and rarely if ever breaks 2000 rpm at cruising speed. Now, there is another option if you can find someone to do it and that would be adding a second or bigger tank to a gasser. As far as the diesels go, I believe they all gain 10 gallons ish in capacity and a few better mpg makes that go even farther, which seems to be a significant concern for you.

    OK, food for thought even though you didn't ask this question: if you go diesel, give serious consideration to going with a 1 ton. Now that everyone's heads have exploded because it's going to ride terrible compared to their 1/2 tons let me explain, 1) the last half ton I drove rode like crap anyway. 2) by the time you add the diesel you lose your payload advantage of the 3/4 ton. This will be important when you get your bigger trailer. I know, that's never going to happen. . Now, how do you solve the "terrible ride" problem of the bigger trucks? Easy peazy, keep between 500-1000 pounds of stuff in the bed to keep some weight on the rear springs. With my cap, my 200 pound trailer hitch in the bed and a row of firewood in the front of the bed my Chevy 3500 rides like a Cadillac. Have the bed empty and you will lose some fillings. Keep a little weight in the bed and it's our main road trip vehicle, rides as good as or better than any car we have owned in the last 10 years. Even with 1000 pounds in the bed of a 3500 with a diesel the truck doesn't notice and doesn't care, no performance or fuel mileage difference at all.

    Good luck with your search, honestly I often suggest in these situations that you go find a dealer that will let you do an overnight test drive with a lightly used truck in the configuration(s) you are interested in. They don't have to know what you are doing with it. Strap the rig on the back and take it for a spin, put a few miles on it. Your questions will all be answered very quickly.
     
  3. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,357
    Likes Received:
    2,187
    Joined:
    May 31, 2018
    Location:
    Nj
    Sway bar will fix the sway. Gas millage will not be good whaterver you have. And i thought they were doing away with the pig fuel?
    Up it to a 1 ton, wow . Might as well keep going up and get a rv. Cut out the middle man!
     
  4. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,850
    Likes Received:
    841
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    The current generation of long bed Super Duty gassers hold 48 gallons.
     
  5. RockyRoo

    RockyRoo Just because you CAN doesn't mean you SHOULD

    Messages:
    6,530
    Likes Received:
    130
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    The long bed likely would have a larger tank, I wasn't really considering that as most people don't want them. I personally have a crew cab long bed and love it, perfect truck for me, but most would hate it. That said, 48 gallons is pretty impressive. My 36 does very well but for long haul drivers 48 would be awesome.
     
  6. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,850
    Likes Received:
    841
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    Both of my full size trucks are long beds. I wouldn't consider a short bed.
     
    RockyRoo likes this.
  7. NorcrossFlyer

    NorcrossFlyer Active Member

    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    29
    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2015
    Location:
    North Georgia
    Why? Is it the larger gas tank or something else?
     
  8. NorcrossFlyer

    NorcrossFlyer Active Member

    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    29
    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2015
    Location:
    North Georgia
    Other than making sure you are loaded with enough DEF, what are the issues?

    I'm definitely going with a 3/4 because I want the truck to completely overpower my current trailer and the next trailer I buy. My F-150 was perfect for the pup as it didn't even really register but with my TT all the movement is unsettling.
     
  9. RockyRoo

    RockyRoo Just because you CAN doesn't mean you SHOULD

    Messages:
    6,530
    Likes Received:
    130
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    The DEF systems across all manufacturers are notoriously unreliable. Mine tried to leave me stranded 2 days from home at 24000 miles. Fortunately a small town dealership got me in immediately and got it turned around the day before I had to pull out to head back home. The good news is, they are covered under the powertrain warranty. The bad news is, you will likely need that coverage. I was giving serious consideration to deleting mine but then I added an extended warranty up to 120,000 miles to cover other issues that were already popping up. I definitely wouldn't delete anyway till your factory warranty is up as it "voids the warranty".

    How big do you think the next rig will be? How long do you intend to keep your truck? If you plan to keep the truck for a while and the next trailer is going to have over 1000 pounds tongue weight or be a 5er, I would definitely consider the 1 ton. The cost is minimal, and instead of the under 2000 pound payload you will get with a 3/4 ton you will get upwards of 3500 pounds payload, with no noticeable difference in ride. Just a friendly suggestion to help save some money in the end instead of doing it the way I did it and end up wasting a bunch of money by making payments on the wrong truck for a year.
     
    bearman512 likes this.
  10. RockyRoo

    RockyRoo Just because you CAN doesn't mean you SHOULD

    Messages:
    6,530
    Likes Received:
    130
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    For me, I had both the 1/2 ton 5.5 foot (piss you off size) bed and the 3/4 ton with the 6.5 foot (almost useless size) bed and I do a lot of hauling from the home improvement stores and lumber yards. I really don't like hauling with my tailgate down. The 8 foot bed is just the best size bed when you actually use it for a truck. Now, a couple nice side effects: 1) the longer wheel base rides better, 2) With my 5er I don't have to worry about hitting the cab on tight turns, 3) Lots of people complain that with the 5er hooked up they don't have any room in their bed for anything else. I have LOTS of room in my bed even with the rig hooked up. Your mileage may vary. Many people don't like the length of the crew cab long bed. It doesn't bother me, and the wife doesn't mind it either so I don't think we will own anything smaller than a long bed again. Just know ahead of time that it will have a good half mile turning radius. ;)
     
  11. NorcrossFlyer

    NorcrossFlyer Active Member

    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    29
    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2015
    Location:
    North Georgia
    What do you mean by "deleting"? Cutting the wires or whatever on a DEF system? How would that work in a state with emissions checks?

    Haven't thought about a 1 ton. But all ideas are on the table because the last thing I want to do is chose an option that doesn't work long term.

    This will be a 10+ year truck that would accommodate our current TT and the next one which will be either a slightly longer TT with slides (30-35') or 35-ish 5er. I don't have any intention of going to some crazy 3 axle 5er with all the side porches and junk.
     
  12. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,850
    Likes Received:
    841
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    I want as much cargo capacity as possible.

    RockyRoo pretty much summed it up.
     
  13. RockyRoo

    RockyRoo Just because you CAN doesn't mean you SHOULD

    Messages:
    6,530
    Likes Received:
    130
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    My understanding of deletion is removing all the BS DPF's, injectors, tanks, heaters, sensors (and there are a lot of them), sensors, you name it it's in there, and replacing it with a straight pipe and reprogramming the engine computer to run without them. States with emissions checks are a problem for these people that do this. It's also one of the reasons I haven't gone that route, I am moving to Virginia soon from Ohio and my understanding is that they have annual vehicle inspections. I just don't want to deal with the hassle. The exhaust system on these things is so complex that rumor has it they cost roughly $10k to replace the entire thing, and it doesn't matter which manufacturer you buy from because they all use similar systems.

    So just for fun let's play with some quick numbers. I have a 36 ft mid-higher end 5er with 3 slides. She scales at about 12,500 packed for a week long trip with 4 adults and a dog. GVW is 14k. My pin weight is approximately 2600 pounds per CAT scales. My hitch weighs roughly 200 pounds. We often carry 4 adults, let's just average them out at 200 pounds each for 3, driver is not counted for payload. We are at 3400 pounds payload applied to the truck. My 1 ton Chevy CCLB 4x4 has a payload sticker of 3499 pounds available. So you can see I am already pretty much right at my payload rating if I put anything else in my bed and I often carry a fair amount in my bed as well. Now, you can certainly buy lighter 5ers, but this is in no way the heaviest out there either.

    Quick edit, in comparison to my 1 ton in the situation above, a 3/4 diesel by comparison would only have roughly a 2000 pound, give or take a couple hundred pounds, max payload rating. A gasser would probably come in closer to the 2800-3300 range depending on options. Lots of people tow heavier trailers with them overloaded, I personally have had enough of lawyers due to my divorce, I don't need any coming after me due to an accident with a severely under-rated truck.

    When we bought the 2500 in 2015 we were looking at 36 ft TT's, and for that configuration it was a good choice due to less payload on the truck due to lighter tongue weights. I guess my point here is, you don't know what your next rig will be. The cost to go to a 1 ton is honestly minimal when you consider the cost of these trucks to begin with. I mean, honestly, less than a couple grand difference, maybe less that a grand even. When I bought my 2500 everyone told me I was making a huge mistake by not going 1 ton at the time. Turns out they were right. If you are going to top out at 32 feet, go with a 3/4 ton. If there is any chance you may go over that, or even to a 5er, go 1 ton and save yourself the grief later down the road.

    Now, if you decide a gasser is the right option for you instead of diesel, none of this really matters because the gas engine saves a lot of weight thus allowing a much higher payload rating. The drawbacks are lower gas mileage, more shifting, higher rpms on hills, etc. There is no perfect choice here, both sides have benefits and drawbacks. Whatever you do, and whatever truck you decide to order, DON'T go by the payload ratings on the marketing publications. Make sure you double check the payload sticker on the door pillar before accepting delivery of the truck.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2019
  14. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,850
    Likes Received:
    841
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    I agree....If you are going bigger than a half ton, skip the 3/4 and get a one ton. You will never have to worry about not having enough truck....My one ton gasser has a 4100 pound payload.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2019
    kcsa75 and RockyRoo like this.
  15. Dingit

    Dingit Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    839
    Likes Received:
    372
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2017
    If you get a diesel, don't do it to save money. Do it for the way it handles loads and mountains. (And don't mess with a 3/4 ton unless there are insurance, licensing, or HOA reasons to not go 1-ton.)
     
    xxxapache and RockyRoo like this.
  16. 1380ken

    1380ken Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,000
    Likes Received:
    461
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2013
    Location:
    Mass
    My 92 Suburban had a 42 gallon tank.
     
  17. nhlakes

    nhlakes Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    643
    Likes Received:
    317
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2011
    Location:
    DE and NH
    Trucks towing RVs typically run out of payload before running out of engine and many RVers tend to want something bigger in a few years. So if you think that's the way your heading, I'd get a one 1-ton and be done with it.

    Everyone agrees diesel is better for towing, but more folks seem to be questioning the overall cost of ownership these days.

    I do similar miles/nights as the OP (matter of fact heading out on a few week few thousand mile trip later this week.)

    We're trying to stick with our 25' end to end TT. (hoping we'll be singing the same tune a month from now) Allows me to get into smaller/nicer sites and get ~13mpg in my Tundra 5.7 (which are known to be gas hogs).

    We used to do 10+ hour days on the road, but we're now trying to keep it ~4hrs. Trying to slow down and smell the roses. Drive slower, on more scenic roads, and be less of a hurry. Admittedly working for myself helps in this department, I can take as much time off as I need.

    Gas stops (which are frequent in the Tundra) used it be bothersome. Now they're a chance to stop, stretch, use the bathroom, and walk around a little.

    Good luck with your purchase.
     
    shuang2, RockyRoo and neighbormike like this.
  18. Halford

    Halford Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,563
    Likes Received:
    558
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Location:
    Santa Clarita, California
    Maintenance to keep diesel vehicles running?
     
  19. RockyRoo

    RockyRoo Just because you CAN doesn't mean you SHOULD

    Messages:
    6,530
    Likes Received:
    130
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    My 91 Burb did too. Man was that fun to watch my 16 year old daughter fill up the first time. . But. You needed that size tank to go 600 miles between fill ups too
     
  20. silverfz

    silverfz Active Member

    Messages:
    742
    Likes Received:
    58
    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2013
    I have a tundra crew max which is comparable to a Mega Cab in size.
    The new tundras have 36 Gallon or 48 gallon for the trd pros.

    I have a 2008 crewmax with 150k which tows the 7000 lb 31 ft TT around just fine for last 4 years. I have the same issue when i shop for another truck. Except for the mega cab the rear space is tightened up with every other model in the market now.

    I have to stop 160 miles for a gas stop as i have a 26 gallong tank which throw the gas light at 20 gallon but we never actually drove 160 before, the longest was maybe 120 miles non stop. when time comes i till probably get another tundra crewmax with the bigger tank and call it day.

    I do have airbags in the rear and also 20 Inch rims with AT tires that kill mpg.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.