Tire and wheel preferences / where ?

Discussion in 'On The Road' started by dviking, May 29, 2017.

  1. dviking

    dviking Member

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    so I have an '07 Viking 2170 I purchased new in '08 tires look ok but am going on a couple of long trips and have long heard 10 yrs are a limit on tires even though they look good. What do you folks say?.
    With that said I have looked around for st 175/80 d13 and have been thinking of going to radials.
    Also here that Rainer tires are pretty bad'/ blow out worthy even. Currently have load stars ( load "d") with white modular wheels that are starting to get a little rust colored. What are the experiences here? Any preferences in places to buy? Thanks in advance
     
  2. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    The general rule is tires should be replaced once they hit the 5 year old mark regardless of the looks or visual condition..

    I would stay with the Loadstar tires, ran them on our pup and had them on our TT in the past, decent tire never had issues with them... My personal opinion is that for a single axle trailer your wasting money by outfitting it with radial tires..
    Wire brush the rims and paint them, good time to colour match them to your trailer or tv ..
     
  3. BikeNFish

    BikeNFish Well-Known Member

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    My advice, buy new tires.

    I have read that trailer tires should be changed every 7 years. Some will even suggest that four years is max. It also depends on the amount of usage and how the trailer is stored when not in use. Trailer tires don't always show their age on the tread. They can become structurally worn under the tread to the point where they can lose their tread.

    Most people also don't realize that most trailer tires (especially 13 inch trailer tires) are only designed to be used up to 65 mph. I have said it before, "just because you can, doesn't mean you should".

    Going over 65 mph increases the heat and increases the centrifugal pressure on the tire and slowly damages the inner structure. The damage is cumulative. Meaning, if they have been consistently been used at greater than 65 mph, you increase your chance of catastrophic tread failure with every trip. I'm not saying that you cannot go 75 mph to pass another vehicle, just make sure you slow back down.

    I have been behind trailers that had tread failure and it isn't pretty.

    I go by the seven year rule and I would never buy trailer tires that weren't radials. I also keep my trailer hauling at 65 mph or less. It's not worth the chance.
     
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  4. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    I mean as a make and model for new replacements, not saying to stay with your ten year old tires ..
     
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  5. dviking

    dviking Member

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    Thanks for the advise. I have been thinking of new tires but now it's on the front burner. Loadstar seems to be the tire but there seems to be a bit of conflict between the bias and radial.......
    I am no saint and the long trips can push me to 70mph...... I know not necessarily recommended but if anyone here has traveled in the northeast you'd know the dilemma. For the few extra $ I would think the radials would be an easier answer, yes?
     
  6. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    A couple of years ago we went from Toronto down to Nashville and back, kept the speed between 60 and 70 mph all the way with no issues with the Loadstar bias plies.. Now if you had an 8000lb or larger TT or 5"er I would say get the radials as they will serve you better..
     
  7. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

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    Check out Carlisle Radial Trail HD tires.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2017
  8. MD Saga

    MD Saga Pop-up journeymen

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    Check the date codes on the sidewalls. Those tires could be even older than you think they are.

    For our previous camper, I thought I'd save money by only buying tires and changing them myself. I change my motorcycle tires all the time. Never again! Took me almost two full days to do two tires and they kicked my ass. I just replaced the tires on our NTU Utah and ordered the tires on the wheels from etrailer. Worth every penny!!!
     
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  9. xvz12

    xvz12 Well-Known Member

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    I worked at a car dealership for 17 years, changing tires was one of my jobs. after i left, was really irritated about having to take tires in to get fixed/repaired, so I bought one of these from Harbor Freight:
    https://www.harborfreight.com/manual-tire-changer-62317.html
    Not as good as the air operated ones, but it does work, I change all my own tires, & even have the attachment for motorcycle tires.
     
  10. Adam H

    Adam H Active Member

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    As noted above: Watch the speed ratings but there are 13" load D radial trailer tires out there with a higher speed ratings.

    Adam
     
  11. mpking

    mpking Well-Known Member

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    I like http://www.trailertiresandwheels.com. I like to buy them premounted, balanced, and ready to go. Usually this is cheaper than my local place. (I always check, they beat them or price match them sometimes)

    ST 175/80R13 Load Range D on mounted on white wheels (Radial)
    http://www.trailertiresandwheels.com/product/Y810160

    I can't find a ST 175/80R13 Load D in Bia Plys.
    They do have a ST 185/80D13 Load Range D
    http://www.trailertiresandwheels.com/product/AB18513D135545WM

    They also have fancy aluminium wheels:
    http://www.trailertiresandwheels.com/page/482815588
     
  12. mpking

    mpking Well-Known Member

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    FYI, that first Radial I linked to is 75MPH rated
     
  13. Halford

    Halford Well-Known Member

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    If you drive fast like over 65 MPH, and only 2 tires share the GWRV of the camper, Radials might be the way to go.
     
  14. AFramed!

    AFramed! Member

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    Tires and wheel bearings are my number one camper concern. Typically over looked with regards to maintence and replacement. Many take great care in regular camper maintence above the tires but only a fleeting glance to ensure tread looks meaty. Yet, the wheels and components are what gets one camping. Tire manufacturers dates, speed ratings, maintaining correct tire pressure & lug nut torque as well as wheel bearing care in my mind should always be the top priority for camper owners. We bought a small air compressor and torque wrench souly for our pre-departure check list. Maintaining tire pressure goes hand and hand with speed ratings mentioned earlier. Repetitive high speed tire revolution combined with low tire pressure on even newer tires causes unseen internal damage that puts many at "the side of the road campground". Tire pressure should be checked prior to every trip and in cooler temps whenever possible. Personally unless one really has a lemon tire (and they are out there) lack of owner care & maintence in my mind lend to more reasons for tire blow outs than manufacture brand name. We replace tires and repack wheel bearings every 3yrs/5k miles roughly. Costly? Maybe to some. But we prefer the cost happening on our time schedule and not at "roadside campground" picking up pieces of our fiberglass side walls. Right wrong or indifferent it's what we do. [ALPU][PUT]
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2017
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  15. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

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    We had radials for years, would never go back to bias ply. They run much cooler, the trailer feel like its on rails behind you. Hoads the road better, better handling. We had the same size tires you have, we ran GY Marathons. No issues, many long trips with much road time on hot summer roads. We would put on between 6 to 14K per year. WE don't let the tires get older 7 years. In the big picture its not worth pushing the age of tires. If you divide the cost of tires 7 or 10 years the difference for cost per year is not much. Not worth being on the side of the road with damage to your camper and changing a tire.
     
  16. dviking

    dviking Member

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    Thanks everyone for the input. After searching around I just went all the way 3) loadstar st175/80r13's with wheels , mounted,balanced & shipped for under $300 even got 2 bearing dust caps. Of course I needed the third for a proper spare because of the radial change.. Recstuff.com was the place..........
    I was thinking I got a little lucky running tires this old with no problems..... Last summer we went to New Hampshire and put over 1000 miles on them. Also read how I have been running them under inflated. Websites say to always run trailer tires at max cold pressure for best load performance and tire life. My old tires read 65psi cold, but I never ran them that high. Around 50 psi was about right. Kinda weird because you never fill a passenger car tire to the max cold pressure. The door sticker always reads lower.
    Now that I know better, I just closed my eyes
    Lol
     
  17. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    Some may argue but that door sticker really only applies to the stock make and model of factory tire... once you change the make, model or size of tire that sticker is pointless... I have always run my truck tires at max cold pressure. ..
     
  18. silvermickey2002

    silvermickey2002 Morris County, NJ

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    I replaced the Load Star bias ply a few years ago with Load Star radials. The tire size is ST175/80R13 Load Range "C". When I replaced the old ones they still looked new and plenty of tread on them. But if you looked carefully some very small cracks were starting to form on the sidewalls near the rim.

    After reading SNOW's response above I always make sure the tire is at max pressure of 50 PSI cold. That's what is stamped on the tire.
     
  19. VDerks

    VDerks New Member

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  20. Adam H

    Adam H Active Member

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    Hello,

    Does your Coleman have 5 lug wheels currently? Is there enough room for the taller tire under your camper?
     

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