Tire check?

Discussion in 'Tires / Brakes / Bearings / Axles' started by bluespruce, Oct 15, 2019.

  1. bluespruce

    bluespruce Member

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    We bought a new to us 2005 Starcraft centennial 3608 a few weeks ago and I’m making a list of things to fix and/or upgrade. We got a decent deal on it and I knew we had to some things but the previous owner said the tires were new last year.

    I start reading too much on these forums and now I’m concerned the PO may not have put on proper tires.

    They are Trailer King ST 205/75R14 load range C 1760 pounds at 50 psi. By my calculations that means a maximum load rating of 3520 pounds.

    The pup GVWR is 3670 pounds and the tongue weight (dry) is 309 pounds. By my math that means a maximum of about 3360 pounds on the tires.

    I guess it is technically OK but it seems close to the limit and I don’t like to operate close to the limit. Sure seems like a load range D tire would have been a better option but maybe this is OK?

    Thanks
    Mike
     
  2. Raycfe

    Raycfe Waterford Ct.

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    Load range D will give you over 500 lbs more capacity . Should be a sticker in one of the cabinets.
     
  3. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    I agree I believe you need load range D. I had the same load range C tires on my camper because apparently the load range C was readily available the load range D usually had to be ordered, at least according to my tire tech. So I’m assuming the previous owner of my camper just put whatever was close not realizing there was a difference. Judging by how old the tires I had on, I’m guessing the previous owner didn’t have a problem, but like you I don’t want to risk it.
     
  4. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Well-Known Member

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    Check the DOT date code on the tires to see how old they really are.
     
  5. GreyFox

    GreyFox Well-Known Member

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    Like most you seem to be concerned about the load rating for these tires but haven't said a word about their age. [?:~{] LR C is fine for this trailer but check the manufacturing date code, if they're more than 5 to 7 years old replace them regardless of how they may "look".

    https://www.tirebuyer.com/education/how-to-determine-the-age-of-your-tires

    And FWIW dry tongue weight means little, once loaded & ready to camp the trailer's GVW will likely be pushing close to it's GVWR which in turn means that 13% to 14% of gross tongue weight to gross trailer weight will be at least 500 lbs. LR C are fine. :)
     
    vagov and Snow like this.
  6. bluespruce

    bluespruce Member

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    Thanks. Makes sense since I think the seller wasn’t 100% truthful about a few things. But in this case I think it was the truth. Date code is 1117 so I think early 2017 which makes sense that they could have bought them last year.

    The battery on the other hand..... only a year old but won’t hold a charge for more than 24 hours with nothing turned on.
     
  7. Rusty2192

    Rusty2192 Well-Known Member

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    Since the tires are pretty new, I’d say load it up like you will to go camping and then run it across a scale to know how close you actually are to their limit. If there’s still a reasonable buffer, I’d run them for a few years then step up a load range when you get new ones.
     

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