Tire info funny story

Discussion in 'Tires / Brakes / Bearings / Axles' started by Raycfe, Jun 4, 2020.

  1. Raycfe

    Raycfe Waterford Ct.

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    My daughter-in-law called me this morning and ask if I had any tires from my old campers. They have Jayco in the 90's. I told them I would look but I needed to know the size. I asked her to go write down the tire size and how many nuts held the wheel on.

    This is the reply I got ....Nylon tubeless C4CB NNX 125. and 3 nuts...
    I guess 1 nut is missing.
    I called her back ....... I'll be down later :):):)
     
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  2. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Un-Supported Member

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    I just ask for them to clean the tire and send me a picture. I can zoom in and get the needed information.
     
  3. Raycfe

    Raycfe Waterford Ct.

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    I just went and looked at them ... 5.30/75D12 Load range C
    I also explain to my 11 year old grandson what the numbers mean ...... Got to make a gearhead out of him.
    His brother was making 2 platforms 2.5" by 2.5" by 2.5" using just 50 toothpicks to hold up a 5 gallon pail for school. We talked about solid vs tubular rods for strength. That's what grandfathers do.
     
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  4. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Un-Supported Member

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    My grandson, 6yo, has his own tool bag. He loves to help you fix things or take stuff apart. There's always something we can fix at the house. I need to go by the small engine shop and see if they have any junk engines we can play with. As we take parts off, I explain flywheels, magnetism, recoil, lubrication, pumps, valves, etc.
     
  5. Raycfe

    Raycfe Waterford Ct.

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    Thats the way to do it. I was very lucky growing up and when I started to work I had great bosses that taught me how things work. I went to a very good trade/high school but the one thing they couldn't teach us was the pace of the outside world. Something that took 2 days to fix at school you were expected to do in 2 hours in the real world.
     
  6. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    Reading these stories warms my heart. My grandfather was awesome with wood working etc. His son, my dad, enjoyed taking things apart to see how they worked, but really had no desire to work with wood or anything. The few times we visited grandpa I remember watching him sand and him showing me how smooth the wood was. He always gave me a sander to let me sand with him. Sadly grandpa lost his wood shop and from there He lost the desire. He never talked about it ever again. It’s like that side of him was lost for good. He got into jigsaw puzzles so we still had something we got to do with him. He must have read the corny joke book somewhere along the line as well. So as a child it was still fun, but I was no longer exposed to the handiness aspect of things. However I think he did install something in me more in the lines of how I think and see a project. Just missing the knowledge of how to do it. Even if the kids/grandkids are really too young they will pick up a little something and will always carry the memories with them. Hopefully they will be able to hold onto it and have the desire to continue it, if not perhaps the way of thinking will carry on. My grandfather is no longer around so I cannot really thank him, so I’m saying it to you all. Thank you.
     
  7. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Un-Supported Member

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    I'm involved with a ministry at church that helps seniors and single parents, without the normal family support, with home maintenance. Most of us are retired, but I've tried to get youth involved without much success. We have one teen, just got a driver license and a truck, that has been with us for 3 years. We have given him hand tools, power tools, work benches, etc. His father loves the skills he has acquired.
     
  8. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    Both my grandfathers were born in the early 1900s, both grew up with the development of cars and airplanes.. one was the son of a blacksmith the other a farmer.. So both had lots of knack for getting something to work, not always the safest way..lol My one grandfather built his own wood working tools, still have his bandsaw, the router was a bit scary to use.. he also dabbled in car repairs I remember hearing the story of him using the bathtub to clean parts. He could diagnose and engine problem by the sound or lack there of. He also tinkered as a locksmith, and as a firearm tech. , this he learned in ww2.. he once shot a hole thru the kitchen floor, unjambing a bolt action rifle.. someone tried fitting the wrong sized bullet into the chamber..
    Guess that's why I play with airplanes..
     

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