Tire Wear

Discussion in 'Tires / Brakes / Bearings / Axles' started by oceanstater, Jul 27, 2020.

  1. united1889

    united1889 New Member

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    10
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Location:
    Fort Erie, Ontario, Canada
    I would also replace those D13 tires with R13 tires. Radials are better for highway. Bias ply have a top speed of 50 mph but Radials have a top speed of 65 mph.
     
    Bultacobill likes this.
  2. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,962
    Likes Received:
    4,351
    Joined:
    May 31, 2018
    Location:
    Nj
    That has changed a bit. They make both with higher rarings now. But the radials do run cooler.
     
    Bultacobill likes this.
  3. Jeep Guy

    Jeep Guy Active Member

    Messages:
    239
    Likes Received:
    154
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2018
    I have a 2008 Starcraft pop-up that weights around 2,000 lbs. Last year I installed 12" Kenda Karrier S-trail radial tires in load range D. We camp once a month within about 70 miles from the house with a few longer trips mixed in. Two weeks ago, we towed the camper on a 2,700 round trip vacation from Louisiana to Colorado and back. The tires now have around 5,000 to 6,000 miles on them, I have not kept track. They still look great with this mileage. No odd tread wear. With the way the original posters tires are wearing, it looks like the axle is slightly bent or overloaded.

    My Kenda radials with around 5,000 to 6,000 miles on them.

    [​IMG]
     
    Sjm9911 likes this.
  4. Sean W

    Sean W New Member

    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    6
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2018
    Using the CAT scales is easy. I had never done it and felt it was a piece of cake. Download the CAT Scales app and just drive up to the scale. The app will recognize your location and ask if you are at XYZ scale. Confirm it and press Weigh. The first weight will cost about $12 and when you do any additional weights within a short time period, the app asks you if it’s a Re-weigh. Select yes and the charge is only like $3 for the subsequent weighs.
    As someone has already said, just make sure your trailer axle and your TV axles are on different “plates” of the scale. You’ll see the lines/breaks in the concrete. When weighing it attached to your TV, the tongue weight will be included on the TV weight. I’d recommend taking two different weights on the scales:
    1) TV and Pup with Pup on the hitch. The scale will tell you the weights of both, but with two different measurements (two different plates on the scale)
    2) TV and Pup with pup disconnected. This lets you see if the actual weight of the pup with no weight on the tongue of TV, and the weight of the TV with no tongue weight. Make sure the tongue jack is on the same plate as the pup axle.

    Take the TV weight from #2 and subtract it from the TV weight in #1 and you have your tongue weight.

    Like most other responses here I believe you had a weight overload issue. Your TV may have been experiencing the overload too if the topi gets weight was too heavy. Tongue weight should be between 10-15% of the weight of your fully loaded pup, and within the max rating of your hitch. I also agree with moving to Radial tires.

    Good luck and safe travels!
     
  5. gardenheather

    gardenheather Member

    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    21
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2019
    When my husband bought our new tires for our pop up he took them right to work to balance them before he put them on. To quote him, they were "way out", meaning they needed more weight than he felt they should have. The first set that he bought, which were rated to carry a lighter load, also needed balancing. I don't know anything about axles and all of that, that's his job, but perhaps the wheels also need to be balanced. We also upgraded to tires that could hold a larger load.
     
  6. Bultacobill

    Bultacobill New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2020
    My bias ply tires had similar wear after my recent trip. You said you went 8700 miles in hot weather sometimes 100 degrees plus on bias ply tires. You also said you had about 600 lbs of extra weight. I noticed your trailer build date was 2010. Are these original tires? Based on your information you went quite a bit of miles, it very hot weather and about 350lbs overweight. This covers about every area a bias ply tire will wear poorly in. This and possibly 10 year old tires. I would replace them with radials with the proper pressure before replacing the axle and go from there. Of course you should check the preload on your bearings( packing nut tight without causing a bind).
     
  7. Anthony Hitchings

    Anthony Hitchings Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    594
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2019
    Location:
    California
    still only 65 mph speed rating :-( [I was wrong, there is a later post with the rating]
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2020
  8. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

    Messages:
    3,442
    Likes Received:
    468
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2013
    Location:
    Thornville, OH
    The other thing to remember is bias ply tires dont get near the wear radial tires get. I I remember my dad felt very good to get 20k off his bias ply back in the late 60's. Once he went to radial he was getting 2x plus.
     
  9. Jack Sprat

    Jack Sprat Active Member

    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    44
    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2019
    Location:
    NC
    You stated you greased the bearings. But have you disassembled the bearings and checked bearing nuts for tightness. All necessary parts, were the assembled correctly. I suspect weight and bearings. Then go to the pros for alignment questions. Laser alignment is more accurate. I have no clue as to who would do trailers. Maybe a high end body shop. Possibly a bent axel l am sure you will get it figured out. Please let us all know.
     
  10. wusthof

    wusthof Active Member

    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    30
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2012
    Location:
    Vancouver, Canada
    I had bias plys on my old coleman and wore really weird. Thank God my newer trailer has radials. Tracks so much better and wears much more even. With that being said, that was one helluva trip you went on distance wise!!! Hope you can find radials in that size and upgrade them PDQ!
     
  11. oceanstater

    oceanstater Member

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    26
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2020
    These are the Kenda Loadstar tire specs:
    • Tire size: ST185/80D13
      • Section width: 7.2"
      • Outer diameter: 24.4"
    • Capacity:
      • Load range: D
      • Ply rating: 8
      • Maximum load:
        • Single tire: 1,710 lbs at 65 psi
        • Dual tires: 1,520 lbs at 65 psi
    • Maximum speed: 81 mph (speed rating M)
    I put new tires on when I bought the camper in May so age was not an issue. I disassembled the bearings, cleaned, and repacked with grease. All parts went in as they're supposed to. I always found different answers as to bearing nut tightness when I did the research. Some people said to tighten by hand, some by wrench, then back it off. Would love a definitive answer from others who know more...
     
  12. xxxapache

    xxxapache Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,299
    Likes Received:
    1,277
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    If the bearings were loose enough to cause the wear you are seeing, you could jack the trailer up and see a definite movement when shaking the wheel sideways. I also would be surprised that bearings that loose would have made your 9k trip.
     
  13. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,912
    Likes Received:
    1,696
    Joined:
    May 23, 2018
    Location:
    South Carolina
    I like to have the tire jacked up, spin the tire, and snug the nut with a wrench. This makes sure the bearings and races are seated, and all the slack is taken out. This is not done when only hand tightened. After snugging, back off until the castellated nut aligns with the hole, drop the cotter pin in, and spread the end.
     
    xxxapache likes this.
  14. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

    Messages:
    3,442
    Likes Received:
    468
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2013
    Location:
    Thornville, OH
    " I always found different answers as to bearing nut tightness when I did the research. Some people said to tighten by hand, some by wrench, then back it off". Would love a definitive answer from others who know more..

    Around 30 years ago before Al Gore invented the internet, I had the same question. I called deter the manufacture of most trailer axle. They said tighten (like 30 Ft LBS) with a wrench, but DO NOT SPIN, back off the nut and hand tighten insert cotter pin or nut lock. The reason for the wrench tighten is to make sure the hub is seated.

    You and can also go to dexter's web site and find the instructions.
     
  15. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,912
    Likes Received:
    1,696
    Joined:
    May 23, 2018
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Snugging is not close to 30 Ft Lbs. It's really turning the tire, not a spin. If the bearing fails because of a snug and a turn, it's a bad bearing. Better to fail then, than on the road.
     
    xxxapache likes this.
  16. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

    Messages:
    3,442
    Likes Received:
    468
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2013
    Location:
    Thornville, OH
    You don't leave it at 30 lbs. You take it to 30 and then back off and re tighten to hand tighten. If you left it at 30 lbs it would destroy the bearing.
     
  17. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,912
    Likes Received:
    1,696
    Joined:
    May 23, 2018
    Location:
    South Carolina
    I understood what you were saying. And I do not leave it snugged. I back off to the slot in the nut. We end up at the same place.
     
    xxxapache likes this.
  18. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

    Messages:
    3,442
    Likes Received:
    468
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2013
    Location:
    Thornville, OH
    Just looked it up at dexter:

    Bearing Adjustment and Hub Replacement If the hub has been removed or bearing adjustment is required, the following adjustment procedure must be followed. For standard grease or oil axles using cotter pin: 1. After placing the hub, bearings, washers, and spindle nut back on the axle spindle in reverse order as detailed in the previous section on hub removal, rotate the hub assembly slowly while tightening the spindle nut to approximately 50 Ft. Lbs. (12" wrench or pliers with full hand force.) 2. Then loosen the spindle nut to remove the torque. Do not rotate the hub. 3. Finger tighten the spindle nut until just snug. 4. Back the spindle nut out slightly until the first castellation lines up with the cotter key hole and insert the cotter pin. 5. Bend over the cotter pin legs to secure the nut. 6. Nut should be free to move with only restraint being the cotter pin.
     
  19. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,912
    Likes Received:
    1,696
    Joined:
    May 23, 2018
    Location:
    South Carolina
    Oh look, they are turning the housing while tighten the nut. Seems like I've heard that before. My last response.
     
  20. tenttrailer

    tenttrailer Art & Joyce - Columbus, O

    Messages:
    3,442
    Likes Received:
    468
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2013
    Location:
    Thornville, OH
    Yep your right 2. Then loosen the spindle nut to remove the torque. Do not rotate the hub.
     

Share This Page