Tires

Discussion in 'Tires / Brakes / Bearings / Axles' started by Jay Meyer, Jun 17, 2019.

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  1. Jay Meyer

    Jay Meyer New Member

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    I've included a picture of the tires that are on my 89 coleman columbia camper. They are "hiway master" brand (this is what was on them when I bought them). I am in disbelief that these tiny tires can take my camper on hours and hours of driving. Are all pop camper tires so small? Is there no need to worry? If anyone has any advice on better or bigger tires that I should be using please feel free to let me know. I know this may sound like a ridiculous question but I know next to nothing about this.

    I'm about to take my camper on it's first road trip and we will be driving for about 10 hours round trip. I'm nervous...I did just have my bearings repacked though which makes me feel half decent.
     

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  2. Anthony Hitchings

    Anthony Hitchings Active Member

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    What is the rim size (10", 12", 13" 14" etc) ...my guess is 10" based on your incredulity over the wheel size
     
  3. Sjm9911

    Sjm9911 Well-Known Member

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    Camper make, year and model will help. Also size of tire ( as said) load range of tire and speed rating. Yea, they dont look like much, but looks can be deciving. Plus look at how old they are. Make sure there up to the correct psi also.
     
  4. Jay Meyer

    Jay Meyer New Member

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  5. MsMac

    MsMac Active Member

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    Yes, looks can be very deceiving. We have an 89 Williamsburg (12 foot box) with 10 inch rims. We changed the tires out during the first season we had our PUP, and have since put about 10,000 miles on them. IIRC, our tires were pricier than the ones you have. I'm not into spending money needlessly, but the ones you have strike me as being a little too cheap, if you know what I mean.

    Do you have an actual tire store near you that you can bring the wheel to? I'm sure they'll be able to give you good information about the tires you have and perhaps what may be better options for you. (And it will give you a chance to see how the tire comes off and on without the stress of being on the side of the road... :) )

    If you're interested, I can give you the make of the tires that we have once the sun comes up and I can actually see them.

    ETA: If the tires are good, there is absolutely no need to be nervous about driving 10 hours round trip on them. Just make sure that when you stop, you check the temperature of the hubs and do a visual on the tires. But, really, there's no need to worry about travelling that distance on tires that size.
     
  6. joet

    joet Well-Known Member

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    Something on one has mentioned, how old are the tires? If 5 years or older, replace. All tires have a date code on them. The code will be on the sidewall in a small rounded box . It will consist of 4 numbers. Example 2015 with 20 being the week of the year they were made and 15 being the year
     
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  7. Flipped in NH

    Flipped in NH Member

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    These are the same size as the ones on our 74 Jayco Flipper which is a light PUP. We replaced the tires with the same size, (not the brand you have) repacked wheel bearings and headed out on a 2400 mile round trip. No problems at all. We checked heat on the tires and hubs each time we stopped but nevermore than slightly warm.
     
  8. Matt Benoit

    Matt Benoit Well-Known Member

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    Don't worry too much about the size of the tires. Worry about the age and the load rating. Make sure the tires are capable of supporting the load of the trailer. Upgrading to larger wheels is easy, just make sure you have enough space. Also remember, these bias ply tires are almost always rated for 65mph max.
     
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  9. theseus

    theseus Centerville, OH

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    Preach brother!
    Not always. The bias ply tires I use are rated for 81 mph. But pay attention to the speed rating you buy...
     
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  10. Matt Benoit

    Matt Benoit Well-Known Member

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    I did say almost always lol
     
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  11. theseus

    theseus Centerville, OH

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    So you did! [:D]
     
  12. GreyFox

    GreyFox Well-Known Member

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    Tire date code is 4 digits for the year 2000 and later, tires manufactured before 2000 will have a 3 digit code.

    https://www.tirebuyer.com/education/how-to-determine-the-age-of-your-tires
     
  13. Jay Meyer

    Jay Meyer New Member

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    Thank you everyone! I appreciate it.
     

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