Total Conversion Project - 1998 Coleman Sea Pine

Discussion in 'Camper Restoration Projects' started by arkangel, Jun 19, 2013.

  1. arkangel

    arkangel Member

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    The rollers were another lucky find. I have no idea what they came from but they are perfect. They are rolling on ball bearings, covered in rubber, and have their own custom brackets.

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    As the bedroom is pulled out the rollers bear weight on the flat top surface of the support arms. This system effectively removes most of the extra stress acting on the OEM bed track system.

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    Now the bedroom has support when being and while deployed. All it needs is support while in transit...
     
  2. Twitch22

    Twitch22 73 N6DDY

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    very nice....what are you going to use to lock the bed in place when it is in or out. Seems to me that with the rollers both in the arms and also on the bed itself that it would move pretty easy on it's own.
     
  3. arkangel

    arkangel Member

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    FJGuy: The original bed support poles are used in tandem with the support rails when the bedroom is deployed. There was no reason to remove them and they can only lend stability to the system.

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    Now that the frame is finished, the insulation is in place, and the inner wall panels are installed I am ready to start on the exterior. Finding the right material to cover the exterior in was a big decision for me. Filon was too expensive and was out of the picture from the get go. Residential siding was attractive for the price but I doubt its resistance to the rigors of travel and the elements. I have mentioned before that I happen to work with a guy who used to manufacture trailers for the now defunct KIT company, right here in Kansas. He had some left over aluminum camper siding from the old days he was willing to donate to the cause, and so my solution was found. That's the stuff there underneath the camper in this photo. Also a good look at the dynamics of the bedroom supports.

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    These aluminum panels are pre-painted white and interlock to create an effective weather barrier without the need for sealants.

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    Each aluminum panel interlocks with the next from the top down. The top panel is put into place first and stapled down on the upper lip. The next panel slides into a fold in the previous panel and locks into place. Then, the bottom receiving edge is stapled down on every stud. This process continues until the area is covered, however, you must first measure the distance from the bottom edge up and cut the top panel short to ensure that the bottom panel is located at the desired point to ensure total coverage. I used a few scrap panels to measure the proper cut and placement.

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  4. arkangel

    arkangel Member

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    I really had a good time installing the exterior siding. I have little experience with contracting, building, and remodeling so it has been fun to dip into those fields on this project. After selecting the best pieces I had to pressure wash them to get them clean after ten years in a shed.

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    At this point I thought: Boy this thing is looking good. But there was a lot more work to do.

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    I had to look for some help with the details of installation of this stuff. It was easy enough to lay the panels down on the side, but when it came to the corners I was largely unsure of what to do. I did some youtube research and found out that the best way to finish the corners was not to butt them together but to wrap one over the other to help create a better moisture barrier. It's fairly easy to do with a small rubber mallet.

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  5. jayco1997

    jayco1997 New Member

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    will you have any windows on the door side?
     
  6. arkangel

    arkangel Member

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    jayco: No windows on the door side this time. I wish I could have done it but the dedication to simplicity and other deadlines made it impossible.

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    Once the major exterior surfaces of the camper were covered it was time to begin finish and trim work. The doorway and forward facing surfaces were too narrow and tight to efficiently use aluminum siding so I used Filon fiberglass sheeting. It can be scored with a utility knife and snapped into sections with clean edges. You can also use air cutting tools if you have fancier equipment than I.

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    We use an automotive paint gun to spray a contact adhesive made by 3M when applying this stuff to large surfaces. For my purposes a paint brush could be used. The adhesive gets tacky and dries very quickly so you would need a rapid delivery method such as the paint gun for larger areas. The adhesive itself is green and behaves a lot like rubber cement with a lower viscosity. It must be applied to both surfaces and allowed to "tack up" before application. Once you start mating the two surfaces you had better be sure you have it where you want it. Removing it is not only really difficult but it destroys the bond and you have to start all over.

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  7. arkangel

    arkangel Member

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    Front edge of the camper and what will eventually be the frame of a large compartment door which conceals the bedroom opening. The bare wood of the frame must be covered and waterproofed in every location where it will be exposed to the elements.

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    The Filon has been cut to fit and adhered directly to the wooden frame. I still wish I could have wrapped the entire camper in this stuff but it would have been impossible. The pieces I used were scraps left over from rebuilds and I was lucky to have them. The bedroom itself will need to be covered in Filon to work with the seal system I have developed and I don't have enough to finish it. I'll be getting there soon...

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    The last step is to trim and wrap the siding over the exposed edge and staple it down. Once the edge is wrapped it will be covered with a piece of extruded aluminum corner trim designed to protect and weatherproof the seam.

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  8. arkangel

    arkangel Member

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    With the main body of the camper covered it was time to decide on a solution for the roof. I had already decided on making the main roof fully "walkable" so I used 5/8" plywood for the main roof and settled on 3/8" plywood for the bedroom. The front leading edge of the camper remained largely unfinished until the end because it's design depended largely on the final design of the main compartment door and how large the door opening would be.

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    I knew I wanted to incorporate a radius of some kind to help with aerodynamics in some way or at least to give the camper some definite sense of 'front and back'. It's already going to be like dragging a billboard down the highway so anything to help get the air up and over the roof will be helpful. In the end I used a leftover piece of aluminum radius sheet metal at the front corner to terminate the roof framework and provide the desired transition.

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  9. turborich

    turborich Active Member

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    Are you sure the axle will safely carry the weight? I'm sure it's much heavier now versus when it was still a pop up. [2C]
     
  10. arkangel

    arkangel Member

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    turbo: The total weight is a constant concern. I am hoping that I won't have to modify the suspension in the end. I think the axle and leaf springs are stout enough to handle the load but I am thinking I may need a better tire to accomodate the weight. Once I am finished with the initial construction I will take her to a scale nearby and weight her in. If we are anywhere near my 2000 Lb goal I don't think I will have to do anything. The stabilizer jacks are currently down and have been holding up the extra load since I put the roof on. I had to move the camper before the roofing phase and when I took the jacks up to move it the weight seemed not only pretty reasonable but also distributed pretty evenly from front to rear. Fingers crossed!

    Here are a few more shots of the roof before the final phase of the process.

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    I found myself out of time and lacking in the proper tools to make a proper filler block for the radius corner so I used what wood pieces I could to fill the gap and then just wrapped the siding and radius metal as closely around the corner as possible.

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  11. turborich

    turborich Active Member

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    It sure looks like you're doing a fine job on it and I can't wait to see the final results, just like everyone else [8D] I will be waiting for updates! [CAM]
     
  12. arkangel

    arkangel Member

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    And so it comes to the roof. I wanted to find a covering that was both cheap and strong. As it turns out the feasible options are limited and the obvious choice (which is not the cheapest) turned out to be the best and most effective. EPDM rubber. 40 mils thick and white on one side specifically for RV roofing to help reflect the suns heat. I had the option of ordering it through the dealership but even with my discount the amount I would need was going to cost something like $600. That was twice what I had put into the entire project so far. So I went to eBay and did some searching. I found a vendor who sells EPDM in precut sections in order to cut some cost. I was able to get an 18'x9' section for $179 plus $52.83 for shipping (ouch). That's less than half the closest competitor. At $231.83 I had to save for a few months to be able to afford the bill. Luckily this was during the last months of winter and since it was colder, longer this year I had some time to get the funds together. Admittedly there was a month or two there in January/February that not a thing got done...
     
  13. arkangel

    arkangel Member

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    That should probably be more like January/February/March/...
     
  14. Nixie

    Nixie New Member

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    I will be watching this. We actually have a Keystone 21rs Outback which is the littler cousin of the pic you posted.

    Your bed supports are very close to what is on the Keystone. Our actual rollers fit into the channels of the bed supports that way you can't pull the slide off the supports or push it in crooked. You probably won't have that problem because you still have the pup's bed slides helping the rollers.

    A lot of Outbackers use an "I" shaped "jack" for lack of a better description underneath the lip of the slide for support during travel. When it is travel mode, it is being supported by two tracks on the ceiling. When out, the whole weight is supported by those bed arm supports.

    There are only two things that concern me. The weight. The rear slide is gonna be a TON of weight towards the back of the trailer causing it to be a lot lighter on the tongue. This is exactly what you don't want. How are you gonna counteract that? My second concern is the weight of the slide on that backwall. When you are towing, the backwall and the sides where the bedslides are, are going to be taking a beating when the camper is going down the road. Are they gonna be able to hold up to that kind of abuse? Some sorta "slide stand" should help with that though.

    I love the ingeniousness (that may or may not be a real word, but I am still gonna use it!) of this build. I can't wait to see how it all comes together.
     
  15. Jayko

    Jayko Jayco 141J aka Big Bertha

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    Keep the photos coming. please. So interested in your project
     
  16. Tribble

    Tribble New Member

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    Insanity! lol I love it, and i have Workshop envy!

    With the amount of work my Willy needs, i'd Dread a project this big!
     
  17. arkangel

    arkangel Member

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    Behold my first attempt at an industry standard EPDM rubber roof! I am quite happy with the outcome. It may have some shortcomings but I think overall it will work well. I apologize ahead of time for the lack of photos from the actual roofing process. It was sweltering, I was working alone, and there was beer involved. We'll take a look from afar and then move in closer.

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    Here you get your first birds-eye view of the slideout bedroom.

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    Looks great when brand new and clean.

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  18. arkangel

    arkangel Member

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    This may be the first full view of the rear wall that you have gotten. The window provides at least a little natural light and it is also an escape hatch.

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    And now to illustrate the various trim used to seal the edges, corners and seams throughout...
     
  19. bigdad

    bigdad Active Member

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    Nice
     
  20. BigBaron

    BigBaron Dreaming of Tommy's chili cheeseburgers...

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    Wow.
     

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