Total gut job.

Discussion in 'Camper Restoration Projects' started by Jennypopup2, Oct 12, 2020.

  1. Jennypopup2

    Jennypopup2 New Member

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    So I got this pop up.....
    If anyone knows what year this Coleman Columbia is, that would be helpful.
    They said it’s a 1992 (working on getting the title). I think it’s a 1988, possibly 1986. It has an expand-a-bed in the rear bunk. (I do not see vin number stamp or sticker anywhere.)
    Everything flammable has to go, lol.
    I’m looking for ideas/product suggestions to wash down the metal/frame once all the wood/fabric is out. Once that is done what smaller/easier step(s) would you suggest to do next? I know this is a huge project and I’d like to ease into it with some quick gratification. Plus winter is coming and indoor work space is limited.
    Thank you in advance for your advice and support!
    5CDDD89C-B6B9-443E-8A2B-41C48C5C1EEB.png
     
  2. eoleson1

    eoleson1 Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    If you look in the resources section, you'll find brochures for many years of Coleman campers. You can try to match up details on yours with the pictures in the brochures.

    Good luck with your project!
     
  3. Rik Peery

    Rik Peery Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    I like the cabana/tiki bar look, leave as is...jk, I'm geared to destroy stuff, not rebuild lol... take pics as you progress, sure others can help...
     
  4. Jennypopup2

    Jennypopup2 New Member

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    Thank you. I have, it got it narrowed down to 2 models.
     
  5. Fish N Farm

    Fish N Farm Active Member

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    Did you get that out of NO after Katrina? Or maybe around Lake Charles? That looks like a triple throw down job.
     
  6. flingwing1969

    flingwing1969 Active Member

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    You are on the right track - take out all the trash that you KNOW will not be usable. I would not order new canvas until you decide it is worth the effort and the expense.

    You have to look at it the way they put it together. The frame is first to eliminate as an issue - give it a good look; no cracks, no broken members, no deep rust, etc. It and the suspension are the PUP's foundation. With the cabinets out, look at the floor, it might be a good time to consider replacement anyway, you won't want to do that after new cabinets are in. Look at the side and end walls for water damage and be ready to replace anything with rot or separation. Check the lift system for defects and you might even consider replacing all the cables now - check the little pulleys for condition - they should not be too wobbly and should roll nicely. Inspect and lube the Whiffletree now - much easier with the floor removed - expect to replace any suspect parts. Inspect the top for water intrusion damage and be ready to replace the damaged parts - not a job for the faint of heart. With it gutted, look at all the wiring and consider the possibility of replacing that 30 year old stuff.

    All you should have done now is clean, disassemble the junk, and inspect. Now you need to add up the tally - time and money and then see if it is actually worth it to you to go with a rebuild. You will have a nice unit if done well, probably better than the day it left the factory, but if you spend $10k on a 30 year old PUP, have you really done yourself a favor.

    Materials are important to consider too - it is easy to convince oneself that you can build better cabinets, for example, than the factory crap of paper thin plywood, and you would be absolutely right, but building nice cabinets with 5/8" oak plywood means a LOT of weight that was never intended to be curb weight on that chassis. Keep it light or you will be hard pressed to haul anything but a feather bed.

    Like others said, keep us up to date and send pix. We are with you in your journey. I've been there myself - except my canvas was good.
     
  7. flingwing1969

    flingwing1969 Active Member

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    I think you have an '84ish PUP. The double lines down the side were gone by '88, replaced by a single, wider trim. "Coleman" was in script in '86 too not the large typeface on yours. Here is a good redo on an '84 Columbia you might want to look at.

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