Towing with a subaru 2009 forester

Discussion in 'Tow Vehicles, Hitch & Towing' started by TGreek, Feb 25, 2015.

  1. TGreek

    TGreek New Member

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    Is this battery good to use only for my breakaway switch ?

    AMAZON:
    A. 2V 9AH battery - APC Back UPS 350 Replacement SLA Battery
    B. Power-Sonic PS-1290, PS1290 12V 9Ah UPS Battery (WEIGHT 5.5LBS.)

    I am not sure which one to buy!

    I want to replace the existing one(45lbs) in order to reduce tongue weight.

    thank youpower sonic lowest price 1
     
  2. Cropduster

    Cropduster New Member

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    I didnt read every post. but OP did you actually weigh the tongue of the camper? and if it is a few pounds over you can adjust it by changing where the items are in the trailer. Move your food cooler to the rear of the camper for example. Semi Truck drivers have to adjust there load every time they get one. They have a gross (total) weight they cant excede but also per axle weights they cant excede. They control that partially by how the trailer is loaded (also by adjusting axles but you dont have that option).
     
  3. Halford

    Halford Well-Known Member

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    I damaged the breakaway cable... I just cut it off
     
  4. speckhunter80

    speckhunter80 Well-Known Member

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    Yes a 9AH battery should be sufficient to engage the brakes if the emergency breakaway pin is pulled provided it is fully charged
     
  5. paddykern

    paddykern Member

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    Late to discussion.

    Tow a 1900 lb. pup with 2004 Forester XT and 2005 Outback Sport.
    Both are 5 speed manual and well over 100,000 miles.

    Pup has brakes .

    Installed an AGM battery under the back dinette seat to counter balance trailer to 200 lb. hitch weight.

    Towed all over the country from Michigan to California to Florida to Maine and everywhere in-between since 2009. Before that had a 1000 lb. pup.

    Never had a problem in all the years and miles.

    Biggest problem I have is when I will need to replace either Subaru, they have downgraded the tow weights and have fewer with manual transmissions.
     
  6. TGreek

    TGreek New Member

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    Thank you Paddykern for your email. In 2 weeks I am going up North (about 250 KM) and I will let you know about my towing experience.


    Thank you
     
  7. TGreek

    TGreek New Member

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    Travelling up North last week was really fun!
    The Subaru was great towing my trailer. The drive was very smooth with a tongue weight 200lb and 2000lb pup weight.

    Anyone knows where I can order a vent lid(cover) for the top of the trailer?
    The original one was very thin and has broken!

    Thank you
     

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  8. Strikeouthhh

    Strikeouthhh Member

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    Also new to the thread - I'll try not to rehash the quazi-political stuff!

    I've been doing fine towing with a Jetta TDi - 6 speed manual. Granted my pup is a lighter 8' box, but it's not waggin the dog by any means.

    For your vent lid, I wish I could help!

    Question - how did your loading go on your trip? did you fill water?
     
  9. TGreek

    TGreek New Member

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    I did not fill the trailer with water in order to reduce my tongue weight.
    when I arrived in the campground I fill in the tank with a little amount of water.

    Hope this helps

    Thank you
     
  10. AlcHemIE

    AlcHemIE New Member

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  11. davido

    davido Well-Known Member

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    The GVWR is the maximum weight that the trailer can bear, including weight on the wheels and tongue. The base weight is the weight that the trailer had when the manufacturer built it, minus things like batteries and propane, typically, and with empty water tanks. The trailer's actual weight is going to be somewhat higher than its base weight. The cargo capacity is that difference between the fictitious base weight, and the GVWR. So the actual amount of cargo you can carry will depend on the trailer's actual weight, not its base weight. Take GVWR, subtract actual empty weight, and the difference is how much stuff you can add without overloading the trailer.

    The hitch weight probably does not include propane and batteries either. So once you get the trailer loaded for camping you'll need to weigh the tongue to determine how much weight it really carries. An easy way to do that is to lay a board across a scale at one end, and a 2x4 at the other. Then lower the trailer's tongue jack onto the middle of that board. If the scale registers 125, your tongue weight is double that; 250.

    Your vehicle can tow up to 2400 pounds, if the vehicle is carrying no passengers, no cargo, and if you (the driver) weigh about 150. Subtract from that 2400 the weight of all passengers, in-vehicle cargo, and your weight minus 150. That final number is how much your vehicle can *really* tow. So if you have two 150 pound passengers, and you weigh 150, and you load up with 100 pounds of gear in the vehicle, your car's remaining towing capacity is 2000 pounds. If you can keep your trailer loaded up such that it stays below 2000 pounds, you're probably ok, assuming you keep the tongue weight reasonable too. This probably means NOT filling your water tanks until you get to the CG, and going very easy on extra trailer cargo.

    Personally, I prefer keeping the GVWR of the trailer below the vehicle's towing capacity sufficiently that there's plenty of room for passengers and cargo in the TV. As an example, I tow with a Chevy Traverse, rated to 5200 pounds. My trailer has a GVWR of 3200 pounds. So if I load the trailer up to capacity, there's still a 2000 pound remaining capacity for the vehicle. I can then carry five passengers (750 pounds, perhaps, and 250 in cargo) while still staying 1000 below the vehicle's capacity. This makes for a comfortable tow.
     
  12. hiker74

    hiker74 Member

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    As a fellow Subaru towing person I would recommend what he is saying too. Don't max out your rig...its probably fine for state road towing in and around your region, but if you want to head out on the interstate or climb mountains that's another story. This is one reason I bucked the advice to look for campers based on gross weight and instead looked at dry weight or weight with options. With that scenario I could know that i was in control of what I would put in the unit and keep the weight down. I found a 1040lb dry Quicksilver 10.0 and only put around 400-500 lbs of cargo in it. The GVW is 1500 lbs so that's right on the money. You'll find that most people with small popups probably exceed their GVW when towing because they want to take everything including the kitchen sink.

    Our vehicles are virtually the same specs as Outbacks and Forresters in Australia and you'll find out quickly that the same vehicles in Australia are rated to tow more than ours. You can see quickly that Subaru vehicles are over engineered so really they are probably much more robust than a Toyota Rav4, Ford Escape or even a Volvo XCountry. To see what those crazy Oregonians do to their bone stock Subarus astounds me...Rallying a Forester off the showroom floor doing jumps into 5' deep puddles, etc...Crazy!

    It's mainly the tongue weight (so you don't signal Aliens with your headlights) and Horsepower...173hp wont do much for ya towing up a mountain.
     
  13. davido

    davido Well-Known Member

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    I do have a 2008 Subaru Outback XT, and with 250 HP / 250 ft-pounds torque, I think it would have sufficient power to tow many pups. But I doubt its engine cooling system could keep up with a long uphill grade and a heavy trailer. Furthermore, I doubt the structure of the vehicle; unibody frame, struts, etc., would deal well with a heavy tow. Keeping the tow weight below 2000 is probably a good suggestion.

    You also have to consider wear and tear on the vehicle. Mine is a manual transmission, so I would be concerned about the clutch. If someone else's is automatic, I would be worried about overheating the transmission. And I can say that I had to replace my vehicle's rotors at 100k miles, having never used it for towing. If I had been pulling trailers with it, they would have needed replacing sooner.

    Anyway, I know people tow with Subarus, and if you keep your weight down, that's probably fine. For my needs I use a Ford Explorer Sport (traded in the Traverse because its transmission never could stay out of the shop for very long.)
     

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