TT -- is it really an upgrade?

NMroamer

Super Active Member
Apr 21, 2016
1,079
Albuquerque NM
Getting old had us considering a TT so we made the leap. Having the amenities was nice until I realized the extra work. Duh, three water tanks and a hot water heater. Propane and battery doesn' t last as long. DW thought the water heater was thirty gallon. Not to mention the ball hitch weight was in excess of 75 lbs.
Back to a popup and a year later sold that.
75 and a bad back took it's toll on my body.
 

heathdavis

Active Member
May 15, 2011
569
Getting old had us considering a TT so we made the leap. Having the amenities was nice until I realized the extra work. Duh, three water tanks and a hot water heater.
Yeah, the salesperson was showing us all the water tanks and all I'm thinking is "Who gets to empty the black water tank?":tongue:
(Maybe I could abstain from using the TT's toilet and let the husband deal with his own "leavings". He just retired from a long career in wastewater engineering anyway so it's right up his alley . :smiley: )
 
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kudzu

Active Member
Gold Supporting Member
Oct 20, 2014
638
Knee deep in kudzu
Yeah, the salesperson was showing us all the water tanks and all I'm thinking is "Who gets to empty the black water tank?":tongue:
(Maybe I could abstain from using the TT's toilet and let the husband deal with his own "leavings". He just retired from a long career in wastewater engineering anyway so it's right up his alley anyway. :smiley: )
The tanks in my TH seem huge to me, 50 gal fresh with 35 gal each for black and gray. My plan was to remove the toilet, since neither of us wanted to deal with dumping tanks. Didn't take long for me to declare liquids are okay but NO solids. I eventually told BF he could use toilet for solids but, "He who does the doodie has the duty, forever." I just use the campground restrooms but BF opted for the bucket method for the solids. Who empties the gray and yellow tanks? Me, of course, since it is my trailer. That is the downside, but the upside is "my rules!" :)
 

kitphantom

Super Active Member
Platinum Supporting Member
Dec 26, 2009
13,933
Albuquerque, NM
Yeah, the salesperson was showing us all the water tanks and all I'm thinking is "Who gets to empty the black water tank?":tongue:
(Maybe I could abstain from using the TT's toilet and let the husband deal with his own "leavings". He just retired from a long career in wastewater engineering anyway so it's right up his alley . :smiley: )
I dreaded the idea of dealing with the waste tanks. Turned out to be far less onerous than I expected. Biggest thing was finding work-arounds for my small amd cranky hands, so I could do connections while solo. Even y poo-adverse friend who goes on some girls’ trips with me decided that she could handle it.
Little did we know that being self contained would be a huge advantage at times. In 2020, with a broken ankle, and some restrooms shut, it made it possible to still camp.
for me, dealing with fresh and waste water tanks, hitch (especially ow that we have an electric jack) is still easier than raising the roof, pulling the beds, etc. on the popups. It all depends on your camper and what is more difficult for you todo.
 

neighbormike

Super Active Member
Gold Supporting Member
Oct 6, 2012
4,092
WI
I don’t understand the “no solids” rule… you’re emptying the tank one way or the other - no matter what’s in it…. To each their own, but personally, I quite like not having to walk to a public restroom every time nature calls.
 

theseus

Living the Darkside...
Silver Supporting Member
Feb 6, 2007
3,553
Centerville, OH
Speaking as someone who has moved to a TT from a PUP, for me it was about set up and take down. I specifically did not get a TT with slides nor is it huge. It is big enough for my wife and kids (if they want to join us) but not too big. Since my PUPs had water heaters and tanks, nothing has changed there, except I empty the black and gray directly at the dump station rather than haul it there in a tote.

10 minutes setting up and being able to urban boondock camp in transit (think walmart or cracker barrel) are all wins for me.

As for being one with nature, that's all about who you are. We don't sit in the camper. It's a place to cook and sleep. The rest of time we are out and about.

Are there things I miss about the PUP? Sure. Are they enough to make me sell my TT and buy a PUP? Nope
 

heathdavis

Active Member
May 15, 2011
569
I don’t understand the “no solids” rule… you’re emptying the tank one way or the other - no matter what’s in it…. To each their own, but personally, I quite like not having to walk to a public restroom every time nature calls.
It's because Number 2 is ickier than Number 1. I've never drained an RV tank but it seems to me there's always a risk of spillage, and such ??
 

theseus

Living the Darkside...
Silver Supporting Member
Feb 6, 2007
3,553
Centerville, OH
It's because Number 2 is ickier than Number 1. I've never drained an RV tank but it seems to me there's always a risk of spillage, and such ??
There is only spillage if you rush. I use my black tank flush every trip. No smells and no drips when I remove the cap

Haste makes waste ... spills

There are highwall PUPs that have black and gray tanks just like I do. That just means that it's not a TT problem only.
 

kitphantom

Super Active Member
Platinum Supporting Member
Dec 26, 2009
13,933
Albuquerque, NM
I don’t understand the “no solids” rule… you’re emptying the tank one way or the other - no matter what’s in it…. To each their own, but personally, I quite like not having to walk to a public restroom every time nature calls.
Me too. We have a perfectly good toilet, we use it. We do have a routine to save space in the tank, but no rules to limit usage. Not having to make a trip to the campground facilities in pouring rain the middle of the night good, and can certainly save lost sleep.

@heathdavis - no spillage as long as one is careful, no hose leaks, and soon. Well worth it to us, but bot everyone feels that way. (At 65+, I grew up with a chemical toilet at our cabin, and have experienced plenty of outhouses over the year, including in current campgrounds. I guess I’m not so sensitive to it as some, including my good friend who sometimes foes with me. Funny, she coped with pottying while backpacking, as my husband and I have.)
 

xxxapache

Super Active Member
Jul 30, 2008
4,558
Count me in as another one who doesn't understand not going #2 in the RV. Getting a usable crapper was a highlight to moving to a TT for me. Getting a black water bath upon dumping would require either a user error or a possible mechanical failure. Either way, it's not nuclear waste. It's a little sewage. Big deal. Wash up and move on.
 

jmkay1

2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah
Oct 10, 2013
7,869
Northern Virginia
It's because Number 2 is ickier than Number 1. I've never drained an RV tank but it seems to me there's always a risk of spillage, and such ??
Grant you for some there could be an ick factor just by thought. Let's put it this way diapering a baby or picking up dog poo is way way way more ickier than dumping tanks. I may not have a TT but my folks did and I've had to dump their tanks a quite a few times. (Made the mistake of telling dad I was thinking of getting a TT and he took that as here you go you get it all right now 😜). I wore gloves and honestly in the whole process I didn't get a single drop on me. It was very easy and no where near as gross as I first thought.
 

kitphantom

Super Active Member
Platinum Supporting Member
Dec 26, 2009
13,933
Albuquerque, NM
Grant you for some there could be an ick factor just by thought. Let's put it this way diapering a baby or picking up dog poo is way way way more ickier than dumping tanks. I may not have a TT but my folks did and I've had to dump their tanks a quite a few times. (Made the mistake of telling dad I was thinking of getting a TT and he took that as here you go you get it all right now 😜). I wore gloves and honestly in the whole process I didn't get a single drop on me. It was very easy and no where near as gross as I first thought.
Exactly. My friend wants a small Airstream one of these days, and I was wondering how she was going to deal with waste tanks. She has a very acute sense of smell, and has issues with poop - cleaning her turtle habitat has been known to make her gag. Not having cleaned turtle poop myself, don't know how icky it is. She's had a kid, and multiple dogs over the years, but it's still an involuntary issue.
When we were on a girls' trip last year, I needed her help with a connection (lesson learned, if solo, use both sewer hoses whether or not the full length is necessary). I figured she'd cope just for that connection, but she stayed close by and watched the whole process. She decided that she could manage the ick factor.
I'll be more than happy to have the TT vs either of our travel trailers on our next trip. We will be based out of a KOA. It's pretty nice, we used it a couple of times for shorter stays, but some of the sites are a bit closer than we'd enjoy in the popup, we manage with the TT. This is one of those trips where the campground isn't the destination, it's the place we stay to explore an area. We don't want to cope with a hideous base, either, though. Although we use many of the same, or same type, campgrounds with the TT as we did with the tents and popups, first the popups, now the TT has widened our choice of cmaping spots.
 

Raven

Member
Aug 7, 2022
18
To me, a TT would be something for if I ever decide to live in a trailer full-time. They are, after all, small houses on wheels. For camping, personally, a tent was fine until recent years. A PUC will be a step up from a tent, allowing me to continue camping, with a comfy bed, a fan, maybe a fridge...

The TT would be an entirely different experience -- many of them I have looked at have few windows and really insulate the occupant from the outdoors.
 

neighbormike

Super Active Member
Gold Supporting Member
Oct 6, 2012
4,092
WI
I don’t quite agree with the whole “TT’s separate you from the outdoors”… yes, a pup is more open, but how much time are you actually spending inside?? If it’s nice out (and quiet) I sleep with the windows & door open. If it’s hot or cold or noisy I close it up and sleep like a rock. When I am not sleeping I am outside - that hasn’t changed since my tenting days OR my popup days.
 

Snow

Super Active Member
Jul 19, 2007
12,272
Ontario
I don’t quite agree with the whole “TT’s separate you from the outdoors”… yes, a pup is more open, but how much time are you actually spending inside?? If it’s nice out (and quiet) I sleep with the windows & door open. If it’s hot or cold or noisy I close it up and sleep like a rock. When I am not sleeping I am outside - that hasn’t changed since my tenting days OR my popup days.
Same here.. also the TT has extended our camping season by two months
 

kitphantom

Super Active Member
Platinum Supporting Member
Dec 26, 2009
13,933
Albuquerque, NM
I don’t quite agree with the whole “TT’s separate you from the outdoors”… yes, a pup is more open, but how much time are you actually spending inside?? If it’s nice out (and quiet) I sleep with the windows & door open. If it’s hot or cold or noisy I close it up and sleep like a rock. When I am not sleeping I am outside - that hasn’t changed since my tenting days OR my popup days.
Exactly, I can spend as much time outside as I wish, as I did in tent and popup days. I'll admit I'm inside a bit more than I expected and really would like to do, but that is due to the same cranky joints that sent us from popup to travel trailer. The dinette bench, with support pillows, is the most comfortable place for me; much of the time, I move between chairs outside until I really need to move inside for a while. I certainly can see outside better than we could from inside a tent when weather drove us inside, and the glass is more clear than the vinyl in the popups was. I have a large window next to my seat, face the door. If I can't leave the door open for some reason, I have a clear window to have a view outside.
We did change our camping base for next week, because the original one had reports of flocks of mosquitoes. I knew I'd be spending a couple of days in camp while Courtenay was off doing rigorous hikes or a backpack, and didn't want to have to stay inside to avoid being bitten. Inside/outside is better as a choice, not counting weather-related necessity.
The popups extended our camping season by a couple of months, the travel trailer by a couple more. Our tent camping season was generally late April through maybe early October, with rare exceptions. Took the popup out in November and December. Now, it is reliably March through the end of November, and we've done a bit outside that window. (in some ways, depends more on the road conditions between here and a destination than weather at the destination - ice and wind on the road are Not Fun.) I've done snowstorms in tents, popups, and the TT, TT is more bearable.
 

Sabotsailfam

Member
Feb 24, 2021
48
San Diego, CA
I tend to bristle at the notion that a TT is an upgrade from a pup. They are entirely different products, with an entirely different experience! Is wine an upgrade from beer? Are hamburgers an upgrade from hotdogs? The cost of a nice new pup is comparable to that of a TT, so if it's not price that's driving this notion that pups are somehow inferior, what is it?
LOL. Well put. Candidly, I want BOTH. I love our popup and wouldn't trade it for a TT; even a fancy one. Sometimes it cracks me up that people want to replicate their homes when out camping. Shut the door and shut out all the nature? Pass on that one. I'll zip open all the screen windows on the PUP and have a 360 of birds chirping and wind in the trees.

But....sometimes I'd like some of the TT benefits when doing longer trips with shorter stays. Actually, a motorhome would be great too. All I need is a ton of $ and more room at my house and I'd own 'em all. And a big sailboat. And a big trawler. Probably a ski boat...and a.... Bottom line, you nailed it. There's almost no comparison between the two. Cheers.
 

oldspartan

New Member
Oct 8, 2021
6
We have had tent, pop up, tt and class a and c over our many years. Each filled a need at particular stage in our lives. About 4 years back bought our lay unit, Jayco hybrid. It covers all the bases; canvas got the outdoor experience, comfort on long explorations. Adequate sleeping when grands are with us, and most important plenty of space for dw, two dogs, a cat and a bird. We spend about 6 months min on traveling.
 

caverunner17

Member
Jul 22, 2022
12
We just got our PUP this year (an 8' Rockwood 1640), however we are already talking about the future.

Our PUP fits perfectly in our garage and still allows 2 cars to be parked. It carries everything we need and is a huge upgrade from a tent in regards to inclement weather and when it gets cold/dark in the mountains. It's also super easy to tow and gets great gas mileage on the road.

On the other hand though, my DW isn't too keen on showering with a battery operated shower and a bucket like I am and most of the federal campgrounds seem to be vault toilets only with no shower facilities. Also, while the PUP is fine for a few nights, I'm not sure I'd want to take it for a multi-week trip out west like we've talked about in the future. Also, setup/teardown isn't as quick as I had thought it would be, making some of those weekend jaunts a more involved than I had thought.

We plan on keeping the PUP for a few years at least, but I wouldn't be shocked to see us upgrade in 5-7 years to a 17-18' TT
 




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