TT -- is it really an upgrade?

Discussion in 'Going to the DARK SIDE' started by Ebisaki, Jun 19, 2012.

  1. dion

    dion Member

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    I think our PUP suits our family very well now. Our kids are ages 6 and 2, and we'll probably keep the PUP at least until they're too old to want to camp with us.

    After that, what will we upgrade to? I dunno. Maybe a van camper, like we had before. But a teardrop trailer seems very appealing to me. It's a hard-sided trailer, but only big enough for sleeping. It's got a low roof, just big enough to sit up in. Contrary to some of you whom I respect, I actually like the idea of sleeping in a hard-sided well insulated dry cocoon with no setup time. I just don't want to spend all my waking hours in one. A teardrop is a "hard-sided pup tent on wheels". The idea is to spend most of your fun time outside, and only go inside at bedtime.

    A teardrop typically has an outdoor galley in the back for cooking. Convenient, and the hatch provides a little shelter from light rain, but basically you're cooking outdoors in the weather. It can be closed at night for protection from wildlife.

    A teardrop combines the easy setup and secure sleeping arrangements of a TT with the size, weight, and towability of a very small PUP. The only reason we didn't get one was because, with kids, we wanted more than one bed.

    If we get one, it'll definitely be an upgrade for us. Others might view the smaller size differently. That's ok.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teardrop_trailer
    http://tinycamper.com/
    http://www.socalteardrops.com/
    http://vacations-in-a-can.com/
     
  2. Sharon

    Sharon Dover, FL

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    Snow and Papachaz,

    Im right there with you on this. We dont think of it as a "Upgrade" we think of it as "Moving" to some thing a little easier in some ways. Some things will be added work as our pup didnt have a fridge, bathroom or any thing. Just a Stove, sink and AC.

    But the "Easier" part will be in the actual set up of not having to hand crank the roof up, the bending over to put the supports in the beds and the unloading of all the stuff that we dont keep in the pup.

    We will have to learn things like, the fridge, black and grey water system and stuff like that and how to park and level it when we do get a Travel Trailer.

    But all in all. We thought long and hard about selling our pup to move to a TT. And we discussed what we see in camping grounds. Most in those huge RV's, dont come out and enjoy the outdoors but a few do. And that is fine. Maybe they are just getting away from every day life and want to just veg out with no bothers from every day life.

    As for us on the other hand. We are natural born "Outdoors" people. We sit on our screen porch every night after dinner just to be outside. And work out side as much as possible on the weekends.

    And when we go camping. We are out side the entire time. Even with bad bugs and during really bad thunder storms. We only go inside to sleep. So for us. Moving to a TT is really for us, to not have to repack and unload and to sleep a little better. Due to our medical issue.

    So really, It dont matter what you go "Camping" in. Its really about the person. And if they like to be "Outside" or not.

    Sharon
     
  3. papachaz

    papachaz New Member

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    Sharon

    thanks! i totally agree with you agreeing with me [LOL] [LOL] [LOL]

    as for the black and grey tanks, there are literally thousands of videos and articles on the net to read and watch. i personally don't use the RV STORE bought chemicals, the key to keeping them odor free and working correctly is water! my TT didn't have a water inlet type flush valve, so i installed one in the black tank. get a clear adapter so you can see when the water is actually coming out 'clean' and there you go! and i've found out that it does flush better if you actually get it almost full before dumping. of course, on just a weekend trip, that's not likely for the black tank, but with the installed Tornado Valve, it's definitely easier. we usually pick up some of the cheap lysol/pine sol type products at walmart or dollar general and dump about a cup in after flushing, and add a few gallons of water.

    the not having to pack/unpack every trip, not having to raise the roof and pull the bunks just to get inside to clean or pack....no opening back up if we got rained on.......i installed an electric tongue jack...my only "work" for setting up is the awning and the stablizers. as for leveling, it's the same as for a pup (not sure bal levelers would even work for that much weight and dual axles) but side to side, then front to back, then drop the stabs! refrigerator is better than the pup was, and i cool it down the night before, load it up and change it to propane before i pull out.....not a lot of differences there.

    good luck in your search, and if there is anything at all y'all need help with you know you just have to ask! [:D]
     
  4. West Coast Canuck

    West Coast Canuck Jumped to the dark side ......

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    We don't look at our TT as moving up, rather, we moved over, we felt it was time. Setting up and taking down the pup was getting to be a chore especially going home to clean it. It just didn't make sense to us anymore for short trips, now my wife can stock up the pantry and fridge so ll I have to o is come home after work, hook up and go. The best part is that everything is accessible when we are on the road and we can pull off and sleep without having to open it up. Having the washroom when you are on the road is great too. Now we don't have to pull over to a gas station to use the restrooms...:) don't get me wrong, we loved our pup...had great memories with it. Now it is time to make it easier on ourselves with the TT
     
  5. bobuk1

    bobuk1 New Member

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    [2C] We moved over also....We spend about 3 mos. in the TT over the winter.....sure is nice for us older folks (71 and 70 ).. not so much weekends anymore. use my sons pup for weekends and real camping and he uses my TT for his longer stays.....
     
  6. CREEPPINGCHARLIE

    CREEPPINGCHARLIE CAMPING RECHARGES THE HUMAN MIND

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    Had a nice 30 footer once, it wasn't camping. More like living in a mobile home. Plus you can not camp anyplace you might want to stay. I stay with my pup.
     
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  7. RockyRoo

    RockyRoo Just because you CAN doesn't mean you SHOULD

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    I loved my pups, moving to an HTT was not a move up, but more of a necessity. 2 back surgeries made the pup setup very difficult alone, and as my girls are getting older and moving on (oldest just left for college) putting it up and down on my own was not easy. Add to that the addition of 68 yr old mom with multiple disabilities and the HTT with 3 queen beds just made sense. I love my ROO, don't get me wrong, but I have to admit parts of me are a bit envious of pup owners in some ways. Both forms of camping have their specific advantages to those who need them, but I wouldn't say as a whole that one is better than the other. Now, if I could just get the girls out of the camper and next to the fire with me.
     
  8. Jimbow

    Jimbow Active Member

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    I confess, I was a snob. I shook my head at *everyone* in a campground on my way into the back country. I couldn't understand why anyone wanted the crowds. (even though I met the nicest people there) Then we started spending some nights "base camping" in a larger tent in campgrounds, usually before and after the "real camping". Those stays became longer, now there is a tent on wheels in the driveway. :) We're on the road for a 5 - 6 weeks every summer. If that became any longer we'd want a shower and full bathroom. So I can see us moving up, especially as we plan to be full time RVing or sailing after we retire.
     
  9. ecupcar

    ecupcar New Member

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    I just would like a bigger awning for those rainy days!
     
  10. BigBaron

    BigBaron Dreaming of Tommy's chili cheeseburgers...

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    Get a tarp!


    We always pitch a tarp and do everything outside, even in winter.


    Sitting outside listening to the rain is one of those pleasures you can't buy.


    Tarp over trailer for rainy days
    [​IMG]


    Standard tarp setup next to trailer
    [​IMG]


    Party tarp!
    [​IMG]


    We're nuts, I know... [;)]
     
  11. Mickeyrv

    Mickeyrv Week day camping is great

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    [TV] [HYC] I traded my last pup in on a HTT "Hybrid travel trailer". I still have the fold down canvass bed in the back which DW and I only use for storage of items when camping, The best part of all is stopping where legal to spend a night while traveling, I save enough $$ to buy 2 tanks of fuel and that makes it more affordable to make the long trips more often. Since I run the fridge on 12vdc while towing and AC or Propane when stopped, I always have cold and frozen items available for any time of day. Ice is nice but its a PITA. I'm not able to use the AC or microwave unless 115 volt electric is available. but the stove, furnace, and hot water heater all run off propane and the 12 VDC water pump works off the camper battery. I can stop and be in a clean, confortable bed within 20-55 minutes and then 4-6 hours later be refreshed and back on the road. 3 meals a day in a restaurant for 2 of us will generally will eat up a 50 dollar bill every day, but 50 dollars worth of groceries will normally last 5-7 days in the camper. Coffee at 25 cents a cup beats the dollar-fifty stuff any time and I can make it in under 10 minutes without electricity. I have never had to deal with late night "NO Vacancy" signs or standing in line in a crowded choke-n-puk pit. I never look down at a pop up or its owners, I was their with more that 8 of them when younger, Now that DW and I are retired and no more children at home, we like having things easier to accomplish and more secure with all the misfits in this world. We love to get out and spend 2-3 nights at a time in a nice camp ground when ever possible. Have you ever woke up very close to the ocean where you can feel and smell the salty breeze ? Have you ever woke up in the mountains where you can feel, and smell the fresh mountain air ? If not may I suggest that you try em both and see which one you like the best. DW likes the mountains and I like the Ocean.
     
  12. dave123

    dave123 freedom is not just another word

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    DITO
     
  13. tchlong03

    tchlong03 New Member

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    We just bought our first pup last year and we are loving it. There is 3 of us in the house right now, but we have a 25 year old daughter and her husband and a 6 month old grandbaby. And they love to camp with us when they can. So our pup can sleep nine and is perfect for us with the glide out dinette. My wife keeps looking at TT's but as of right now the ones in our tow range would be a downgrade to us. We would lose the comfort of 2 king beds, a full size bed and a twin. And our pup is wide open to enjoy everybody while inside the pup. With a tt all of them are tight and can't hold the 6 of us with all the cabinets and upright storage. So right now with our current TV we have to stay with a pup.
     
  14. tchlong03

    tchlong03 New Member

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    And on another topic I feel the TT is a downgrade based on towing to me. The pup I feel like i can take it anywhere with the visiblity I have with it behind me. Im not sure about having a big box following me down the road??? lol Would be a downgrade in the fuel department also for us.
     
  15. camp dad

    camp dad New Member

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    We moved from a pup to a TT and I will say that, for us, it was a great idea. We use the TT much more than we did the pup.
     
  16. ve3tiz

    ve3tiz New Member

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    Great thread.

    We went to the "dark side" and came back two years later with our tail between our legs.

    The "upgrade" from our 8 ft pup to a 29 ft tt came with a number of consequences; some we should have known but didn't do our homework, and others that just took us by surprise.

    We had to pay to store it, and retrieve it for trips. The popup could go on our lawn. Or our in-laws driveway. Or hitched up on the road and ready to go in the morning. It didn't take us long to miss that convenience.

    Our newer 1/2 ton pickup truck, though rated to tow the tt, was woefully inadequate. MPGs were so bad we'd burn a tank of gas getting to the park. Gone were the days of flying down the 401 with a smile on my face. Crosswinds and white knuckles now on the menu.

    Our choices of campsites was narrowed down to only those with room for large RVs. The cool quiet "woodsy" spots we used to love were off-limits. With the popup, there was always room at the inn.... somewhere.

    The time we used to spend deploying the pup (which wasn't that bad) was now spent jockeying the larger tt in tight quarters, screwing with swaybars. I was in a foul mood by the time I was ready for my first cold drink. Maintenance, including mindless tasks like washing/waxing was an all-afternoon chore. Not my idea of "recreation".

    We tried the Seasonal Solution for two years and although it started out great, the shine wore off. So we took a major hit on depreciation (that's how much we had come to hate the tt) and bought a very nicely equipped pup, which I call our second UPGRADE.

    Some of our old seasonal neighbours thought we were nuts going "back" (we are, for arguments sake) but I think it's nuts buying something with wheels that is ill-suited to being "mobile". To each his/her own.

    We took the 625D out for its maiden voyage on a winter camping trip to The Pinery and I had the time of my life. It's so idyllic there off-season. Then put it to sleep for the winter.

    Our happiest times were in that first pup. Can't wait to get back to that happy place we had and gave up foolishly a few years ago. Maybe another week or two?
     
  17. niagarafam

    niagarafam Active Member

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    We went back and forth on the PUP vs. TT purchase for 3 years. Our deciding factors were routine maintenance, tow ability, storage, and connection to outdoors/space and openness/closer to camping experience as former backpackers. I do have some physical limitations, but that is why the PUP works better for us. I can wash it like a car and put the cover on it; I can easily reach everything for maintenance. A TT roof and high walls are too much for me; ladders and roof care don't fit the Dr's orders. The PUP travels so ridiculously easy. The set up is not a big deal at all for us, and the space is open, making us closer to the nature around us. We camped Chattanooga this past November. The temps were mid to low 20's with 30 mph wind gusts. With zero degree bags and the furnace, we stayed comfortable. But, having to pack up and leave Florida in a Christmas rain event was not fun. That's the biggest (maybe only) PUP con for us. From time to time, we still look at TT's and hash it out, but we come back around to the same points. I don't think you can call either an upgrade. It's just preference and purpose. Now, we are taking a cross country trip this July, and a TT would definitely be more convenient. However, we have our routine; we hope it won't be so bad. Aside form this July trip, most of our use is at sites within a day's drive. Great thread!
    M&K
     
  18. benfrench

    benfrench Woodbridge, VA

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    We went over to the dark side mainly due to set-up and the short seasons we were able to have. Living in New England, once it turns cold, it is not very condusive to camping. We are the kind of people that spend most of our time outdoors. Our first Dark Side was a 19' Class B Motorhome (Campervan) and it was decent, it did the job. Set up was a breeze (put in park and set the Parking Brake) but it was very tight. We just purchased a 25' TT and are eagerly awaiting it's delivery. It has a great open floorplan with large windows in the dinnette and living room area and the windows open :) It is perfect for us, we both fell in love. While I miss the ability to open every "wall" on the PU, with us going out almost every weekend from April-Nov, we needed less setup time and more time to enjoy our weekend escapes. Different strokes for different folks. Happy Camping!
     
  19. jayco1997

    jayco1997 New Member

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    This trend had some great points. I guess its all about how you plan to use the camper you pick and what your needs are. Too many people like to keep up with the Jones instead of looking at what works for them and their families needs. For the DH and myself, we came from different backgrounds and different camping styles. He was into large TT's and stationary where I was into tents on the grounds and moving about to different campgrounds. When we got married, we ended up selling his TT and we purchased a pup so we met half way in the middle per say, with an upgrade for me and downgrading if you will for him. After using the pup he loved the canvas ends with all screens but he wanted hard walls and I wanted a pup, not a TT. Just today we came home with a hybrid and it looks like it will work out for both of us because we can travel and have either the canvas ends out when camping or closed if we decide not to fully set up. This works for us.
     
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  20. bmcilravey

    bmcilravey Lovin' the pup!

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    Such an interesting discussion. As a relatively new pup owner ( now in year two and lots of advice from @Snow and @unstabletripod) I am merely schooled..but I know this: there are advantages to a pup and some to TT. seems they are not far off apart from things like walls (not having to dry out) and quick setup. It seems to me a TT is that step up of having put in your time of constants setup and take downs etc.

    I hold nothing against TT owners. A convenience I don't have and no envy toward what we each have. I am 45 now. When I am 75 and driving a MH will I bash pup and TT owners. No way ....but by then I will have put in my time of set up,take down etc and want to sit by the fire without hassle. It's about being outdoors ...being with family ...regardless of what you sleep in a the campground.
     
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