TT -- is it really an upgrade?

Discussion in 'Going to the DARK SIDE' started by Ebisaki, Jun 19, 2012.

  1. crackerJack

    crackerJack Well-Known Member

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    We visited the inlaws last month. My first time at a large pvt cg filled with large MH and TT, we always stay at SP's. I had the only PUP out of bout 100 units. We stayed at a central site by the bathhouse and mailboxes. I really don't care, but at first I felt a little like an outcast. Over the wkd several passerbys, commented on how they liked our pup or missed one that they used to have. I came to realize that I had the coolest camper in the cg.

    It's all about your needs. If what you switch too serves more of your personal needs, than it's a personal upgrade.
    My family needs a tent on wheels, not a house on wheels for us to enjoy the camping experience.
     
    bob barnes likes this.
  2. Uncle Wiggly

    Uncle Wiggly New Member

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    We went to the Dark Side two seasons ago.
    The first reason was setup - our backs resented bending over to set the braces under the beds. We considered a large PU with motorized setup but that didn't fully address our setup troubles.
    The second was that our use changed.
    Instead of travelling to a campground to camp in a 300 mile radius, we began cross-country jaunts. 300 to 500 miles in a day, then setup, take down and motor on. TT's have advantages there in that you just drive, pull in, stay hooked up (you can't stay hooked up with a PU because you need to unhook to extend the front end) and take off the next morning.
    Also an advantage and upgrade over a motel because you have your own comfy bed and you don't have to lug your luggage in and out. You can also pull off, nap or fix lunch without a second thought. And the fridge holds more and is easier to access.
    Once we arrive at our destination a thousand or more miles away, we use the TT as a base camp, exploring and experiencing the area. We may visit a friend or two for an overnight or two, away from the TT, and the rig is more secure to leave all our "stuff" in with less worry.
    We are seeking a place for future relocation, now that we are retired.
    We miss the sounds of wildlife, the smell of rain, and the open views of "all windows," but the TT suits our needs better right now.
    We still use our Porta-Potti because it's more handy than messing with a black tank, we have never used the shower.
    I wish we had both - but money and parking space don't allow.
     
  3. silverfz

    silverfz Active Member

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    They are different. I do not understand why the pup guys pity the tt owner.

    I loved the pup but it did not work for my family. living in new england our camping was very weather dependent .
    we loved to camp every weekend , tough to explain it is raining so no camping.

    My wife solo tows and sets up camp. I am yet to see someone talk about how pup is friendly for a woman to setup with a 3yr and 5 yr old. It was always a chore for my wife to park. raise the pup roof and put the sabilizer down. She slide the dinette partially. all the while keeping an eye on the 2 kids and dog raising hell in the car. The potty situation was another one. they always seem to want to potty as she is setting up.

    2 things she could not do and wait for me to get out from work and is wrench the bal level so we can flatten the pup so the fridge works and dinnette locks.then set the beds.

    now she tows a 31 foot hitch to bumber , she parks it most spots and even in ones i will be a bit worried. She locks the wheels with choke. hits the slide button . Hooks the power wire and water. she says in 10 minutes after parking she is done.
    with a working bathroom, the kids are alawys excited about there bunk beds . Even in a downpour she is up and running in 10 minutes. Plus the stress on me to get early so i can get the thing running so she can have a stove to even make mac and cheese is not there any more.

    the only thing she cannot do is hitch/unhitch the weight distribution . I loved the pup and maybe we will go do a lighter hybrid a long way down. We just got a brand new tt. so not for a decade.
     
  4. Wecamp04

    Wecamp04 Member

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    We started out big with a 36 ft. 5th wheel plenty of room could sleep 7/8 .But we wanted to do more weekend camping and were very limited in where we could go for the weekend hour or so drive so we sold our big camper and are looking for something we can use a lot more,like others have said it just comes down to what works for you .For us we will miss the old camper but look forward to the new opportunities the smaller pup will give us ,Happy camping
     
  5. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    I don't really consider one type of camping superior over another, which is what the term upgrade can imply. Up-sizing and adding amenities happens in all forms of camping. I've seen trailers that had less space than our ground tents. Each time we have changed equipment and type of camping - from ground camping (even one tent to another) to 2 pups and, soon, to a TT - we have both gained and lost features.
    Our main ground tents were fairly large - not huge canvas cabin tents, but "6-person" ones, for the two of us. We had the sleeping bags in the center of the tent and our clothing duffels lines up nicely on each side wall of the tent. No moving of duffels morning and evening as we needed to do with the tiny 6' pup.
    The first pup was basically a tent on wheels, though it did have a stove. No furnace, no lights. Even though we had to move things from the top of the galley at each set-up/take-down, it was a bit easier as they all stashed in the cupboards underneath. In the Cobalt, we have moved them to one of the dinettte bench storage spaces.
    With the Cobalt, we gained lights, a furnace, a second bunk for storing duffels and other items in camp and a bit more space.
    We are moving on to a TT because my back issues are now bad enough that I can't reliably handle the entire set-up/take down solo, at least without using a lot of my energy budget on those days (and not being able to sleep that night). Even on this last trip with the Cobalt, my husband ended up doing more than has been our routine - not that he minded, but it sure messed with how we did things.
    The TT we picked is actually about the same length as the pup is when open, though, of course, has a bit more floor space. I found one that is nice and light inside, which was one thing we really liked about the Cobalt - no feeling of being in a cave when inside on a rainy day or at night. Will we miss the feeling of canvas, hearing the morning bird chorus, etc. ? The answer is a hearty "yes". Will I miss the physical and emotional stress of cranking the roof, pulling the bunks out and lifting them the couple of inches to put the supports in place, then flipping the galley and moving all the inside stuff into place. Nope.
    Even though the TT is similar in size to the pup, we should be able to put more inside it, which will mean packing less in the TV. Our thought is that we will be able to empty the backseat as we shift things around, so only the cargo area and Thule will need packing. We will continue to use the Thule roof top box, since it makes a great attic, is the place we carry the campstove, fuel(s), things not needed and is place to carry packs withut damaging them (I ruined a day pack a few years ago jamming it into the TV).
    Until we made the decision that it was time for a TT, I did not realize just how much the idea I was going to drive solo across the country later this fall was weighing on me. Even though I planned to simplify everything as much as possible, at some level I knew I was going to be miserable at a number of points during the trip.
    So, I'm sure we'll find more things that we've given up to move to the TT, but the gain - I hope - will prove to be far more. It will allow me to keep camping solo, and be more enjoyable even on our (more common) trips together. DH will continue to backpack, too.
     
  6. Heartman_wa

    Heartman_wa Active Member

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    I think a lot of the "up-grade" came from the RV industry itself most sales people open up with are you ready to up grade? A lot of adds start that way "when your ready to up grade come see us". The margin in an RV goes up with the size so the sales person is going to want to make you feel that the bigger unit is what you need/want so there pay check is larger. when we bought our PUP the sales manager told us they just wanted it off there lot so the could get something worthwhile in that spot.
     
  7. BigBaron

    BigBaron Dreaming of Tommy's chili cheeseburgers...

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    You'll all laugh when you hear what they call it in Korea - "level up". They mean "move up a level". It still makes me chuckle when I see it.
     
  8. nrg2brn

    nrg2brn Member

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    all types are wonderful in their own way, and Ive owned all of them:

    popup - fits in garage/hoa - camping feel - cheap to tow, dont need giant tv
    5th wheel - tows great! big! cheap per sq. ft.
    class C - uh. um. cant find much to love about these...anyone?
    class D - can be used for so many things! concerts! drive to work? easy to set up.
    class A. more fun than hotels. still camping..great way to spend retirement if you are active and healthy.

    so, my point is, there IS no wrong type. I love to kamp and KOAs and see/talk to all the different people. when I walk back to my pup, I know it was the right choice for ME (US) but not for others, I guess.

    d
     
  9. Jayko

    Jayko Jayco 141J aka Big Bertha

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    I disagree, I have camped next to many tts and the setup and tear down appear the be the same, especially when you factor in the time waiting in line to dump your tanks.
     
  10. silverfz

    silverfz Active Member

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    most campgrounds offer sewer.even the dump runs are not very long. Most waste management plants offer free flush. We use the camper for only kids to pee or if we stay with very crowded campgrounds where they get dirty fast.

    it used to take me 45 to hr to setup with a power lift.now It takes me less than 20 minutes with no heavy bunks.
     
  11. adriva49

    adriva49 New Member

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    Well, it's really timely that I decided to read this forum :) My husband and I have owned our PUP less than a month, and I was looking at TT (the small ones that are very light and compact) and actually thinking of trading our PUP in! We haven't even taken it out camping yet! I must have been crazy. BUT, both my hubby and I have commented that in a couple of years perhaps a small TT might be the way to go. Very little setup and a bit more comfort. We'll see!
     
  12. bud121156

    bud121156 Western North Carolina

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    We had a 12 ft pop up with two king size beds, for 7 years. We wanted to "upgrade" to a travel trailer. We traded for a 17 ft hybrid trailer with one queen bunk in the back. We hated it so much, we camped two times in a 3 month period, and traded it for our current 25ft travel trailer. Looking at our situation, trading from a pop up to the first travel trailer was a downgrade.
     
  13. ImTravis

    ImTravis New Member

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    The wife and I moved to the TT, because she's started to have issues in the PU (claustrophobia) and the weather changes quickly in our new home state. We spent one night out here in KY with the PU, and were camping with some friends and their TT. She decided we needed to move into a TT. I consider for us, an upgrade, as our camping style has changed since we started camping years ago. Now we camp and spend a lot of time outside, but at times (like during a Thunderstorm), it's nice for us to retire into the TT, and enjoy some comforts. My setup and breakdown times are actually quicker with the TT than the PU, but again, this is our situation.. everyone's situation is different. Is it really an upgrade, I don't believe so, I believe it's a change in our camping style. While I love our PU (which I've now put on Craigslist), and even had installed A/C (installed professionally), I've only gotten to use it once since we did.
     
  14. fmbhappycamper

    fmbhappycamper PuP Power

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    Can't beat the 360 view in a Pup [8D]
     
  15. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    As we're heading home on our first, and long, trip with the TT, we are now mostly considering it an upgrade. We still miss some aspects of the pup - being able to see over it on the road, smaller, lighter, less drain on gas, and more of a tent feeling.
    We'll be tweaking storage for a while, some was easier in the pup, some in the TT.
    However, being able to use the TT as a hotel on the road is easier, with only needing to move a few things inside (those secured for travel), not having to crank up and usually being able to stay hitched. We've encountered wind, lots of rain, cold weather in the 2 weeks since I left home; today is the first time we're used the air conditioning.
    The a/c and microwave are nice plusses for the road, though we usually dry camp on actual camping trips.
    While we went with a small TT (17'), our pups have been small (the Cobalt is 8'), so we now have enough space to both stand up at the same time and actually move around to some extent.
    I do find myself wondering, though briefly, if we should keep the Cobalt as an alternative for some trips. Then I reconsider, we need the space in the driveway and I don't want to move supplies back and forth, or run two sets, and my back would still be a problem. We still have good ground tents, so one would be an option if we plan a trip where we don't want to take the TT.
     
  16. silverfz

    silverfz Active Member

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    One the aspect that most forget is to get a big enough TT to get the bigger feeling. I have a POPUP which opened up to 24 foot. We got a 28footer. the length is 31 but its a 28BHS model so get a bigger feel.

    on the other hand as a person who is 6 3/240 I cannot comment on the space being more in the pup. I am always cramped. and the dinette or bench was always too short for my legs . Now I have a full leather couch to sit and even the TT has some tailgating aspect when I hook up the tv outside.

    satz
     
  17. kitphantom

    kitphantom Well-Known Member

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    The TT is a 17' and our Cobalt is 17' open. We have more floor space in the TT, since a good portion of the length on the pup is the extended bunks. Floor plan in either pup or TT makes a big difference. The Retro is the smallest of the TTs I looked at, yet has the most open feeling, and more of the features DH and I wanted. It isn't all an "upgrade" but a recognition of the changes that had to be made so that I can continue camping more comfortably, and solo when I wish.

    I found it interesting to hear that one of my friends informed me that she felt much more claustrophobic in the Cobalt pup than in the TT, which may explain why she never went on a trip in the pup. Realistically, the open feeling in our pup was much reduced in cold weather or rain, since it only has two clear vinyl windows. The TT has 5 windows, plus a pebbled glass one in the door (gives light, but no view) , so it would be interesting to measure how the window areas compare between the Cobalt and the TT.
     
  18. natedog_37

    natedog_37 New Member

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    my 2 [2C]

    Started in a tent mean moons ago. Loved it easy to fit everything in a car etc. But when the first kids came well it was time to move up.

    Got a popup with a slide for a great deal. I loved it and still do going to be sad when it sells. But my issues. Hated putting it away wet and then having to reset it up again at home. Small fridge. Hard to keep cool in the summer unless you want it to look like a UFO, and hard to keep warm when cold.

    1+ you really where still connected to the outside, easy to tow Ram never know it was there.

    TT. While I have yet to camp in it thanks to the foot + of snow I will say this. I love the real bed, the real toilet, and having a show my 6'2" can get in to. Kids each have a bunk and well if it rains we are not all stuck in the pop. The awing is power so I push a button not try to hold it together while raising the top.

    I have back issues also so the upgrade will help me there.
     
  19. heckufaguy

    heckufaguy New Member

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    Grew up camping in a pup. Started our marriage camping in tents, then a refurbed (by me!) pup, then a 19 foot TT and now a 26 foot bunkhouse. Our kids are grown, but we've a 5 year old grand son, my 23 year old handicapped son, and it just made sense to have more room. The cost/mileage change was nominal over the 19 footer, and we get so much more.
    We also have northern breed dogs. And with no one home to watch them, they camp too. A/C is a necessity, as is an escape proof camper. So the TT was our natural choice.

    What I like most, is packup. With a pup you arrive, unload all your totes, set up, then reload all your stuff where it needs to go. Packing up is the reverse procedure.
    With the TT while we 'try' to stow every thing where it belongs, in a hurry we can just throw and go. 4 stabilzer jacks, a power slide, and boom...on the road. Depending on the length of the trip we'll often dump the tanks closer to home, it allows a little agitation in the BW tank to break up any solids.

    I miss the pup, but our needs grew.
     
  20. vinmaker

    vinmaker Member

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    To me, a pop up is a wonderful thing. My unit opens up to just under 30'. If I needed to get this same space in a TT, I would need a 30 foot unit. Do they make many TT's with two king beds? Hmmmm. Not sure. As with everything, they make different products for different people with different needs. As it is, we love our pop up and feel we have all the space we need while we are camping. We also have more countertop than most TT's I have seen. The wife loves countertop space. :)

    Vin.
     

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