Upper limit switch search

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Repairs & Maintenance' started by Dan Wilson, Sep 26, 2021.

  1. Dan Wilson

    Dan Wilson Active Member

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    My popup stops two inches short of a full open requiring taking out the drill for the last few turns. I am trying to find where the upper limit switch is located so I can at least tinker with it to eliminate this issue. I am posting a photo of the winch for your edification and any advice.
     

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  2. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Un-Supported Member

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    There is no limit switch that stops a drill when raising. On electric winches, there should be an upper and lower limit switch to stop the winch motor. Stopping short when raising or lowering is a good thing.
     
  3. Dan Wilson

    Dan Wilson Active Member

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  4. WrkrBee

    WrkrBee Un-Supported Member

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    I did not misread the question. It was not stated clearly.
     
  5. Grandpa Don

    Grandpa Don Well-Known Member

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    There are limit switches visible in your photo. It is that very large nut with the small ball in the center. You have an upper limit switch and a lower limit switch. This must be an electric winch that you are using a drill to raise and lower. That shaft with the very fine thread is what moves that plate forward and backwards until it hits the switch. If you are using the winch motor and it stops too soon, then you are hitting the upper limit switch too soon. Even though you are using a drill, that plate might be bottoming out and stopping the raising motion because it it mechanically binding. If you are using a drill, which is the best way, then those limit switches are useless. To adjust that plate you have to remove that small brass colored nut and the small shaft. Then physically rotate that bigger plate a few turns away from the bottomed out position. After you do that, you might have to adjust that 7/16 inch bolt to prevent the lower limit switch from binding. As stated above, if you are using a drill to raise and lower the top, then those switches and that plate are useless and not needed. I have had to make this adjustment several times after I replaced my cable due to new cable stretch. It is very easy to adjust once you understand how it works.

    You have to rotate that plate to adjust the upper limit switch, but you adjust that 7/16 bolt on the plate to adjust the lower limit switch.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2021
  6. Grandpa Don

    Grandpa Don Well-Known Member

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    One more thing. When I was still using my electric winch I found those switches to be more trouble than they were worth. I had a Green height gauge wire that I used to tell me when the top was fully up, and a slack lift cable to tell me when the top was fully down. I have since installed a manual winch and the Green wire is all I use to determine the fully up position.
     
  7. Dan Wilson

    Dan Wilson Active Member

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    Thanks, that makes sense. Just to be crystal clear I ONLY use the drill to get the last two inches on the lift. That is why I want to fix the upper limit so I don't have to do that.
    dan
     
  8. Grandpa Don

    Grandpa Don Well-Known Member

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    I understand. But many folks have removed their electric winches in favor of a manual winch because of the very problems you are having. They are great when they work properly. But when the don't, it can ruin a whole camping trip. Some of the problems I've heard about are limit switches out of adjustment, weak batteries, motor failure, blown fuses, and up/down switch failure. There is just too much to go wrong with an electric switch. My Dewalt Cordless 20 volt Max 1/2 inch drive drill does the same job as my electric winch did, only with a lot less stress.

    Let us know how it goes.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2021

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