VPN

Ninsapagas12

New Member
Dec 7, 2021
1
The most important aspect of using a VPN is securing your online business. When left unprotected, your private data (for example, bank account information and credit card numbers) may fall into the hands of criminals. A good VPN encrypts your data, so your private data is guaranteed to be protected. Even if you connect to a public Wi-Fi network, your private data is guaranteed to be protected. The monthly price usually varies depending on the duration of the chosen subscription. At bestvpnprovider.co, you can find the best VPN provider to watch UFC and MMA freely.
 
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LilRed

Super Active Member
Jan 9, 2021
1,198
Long Island NY
My ASUS home router allows me to create my own vpn host, great for public wifi, when I need (and remember to actually use it)
 

Patrick w

Active Member
Aug 13, 2021
652
Has anyone done the hard work and research which/what is the best VPN?
Thanks
I like torguard. Been good for me, and it supports wireguard.
There are some free ones out there for sure, but you have to look at what speeds you would like to achieve.
 

Patrick w

Active Member
Aug 13, 2021
652
My ASUS home router allows me to create my own vpn host, great for public wifi, when I need (and remember to actually use it)
Except it doesn't provide any privacy for any outbound or inbound traffic at home.
 

Patrick w

Active Member
Aug 13, 2021
652
Any info on how that works? Is it just thought he router somehow, or is your internet provider involved?
It's a setup in most slightly higher priced routers. You won't find it in most sub 100 routers (GLI.net routers excluded) . Also if you do have a router that does have the capability, make sure the VPN throughput is adequate for your needs. OpenVPN has a pretty high overhead, and benefits from routers which have an Aes-ni built in.

I don't think it's worth securing your connection to home unless you have data at home you need
 

jmkay1

2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah
Oct 10, 2013
7,864
Northern Virginia
Something my dad found out with his VPN some websites refuse to work for him until he gets off the VPN. I don't know the technical stuff about it or why that's the case. Just know that is a downside at least on his.
 

davido

Super Active Member
Jul 17, 2014
1,407
Nord or Proton are good, though there are many others that are also good. You're going to have to pay for bandwidth. Free plans are always very slow.

A GL.Inet travel router that can connect to Nord or Proton or some other VPN using OpenVPN or Wireguard is a very good idea. Then your devices just connect to your travel router. The travel router connects to the campground WIFI, and sets up a VPN tunnel between the travel router and the VPN service, making traffic opaque to the campground network. Using DNS over HTTPS is also a very good idea, as that encrypts all nameserver lookups of domain names (DNS resolution) so that the men-in-the-middle don't know the names of the sites you're browsing.

However, GL.Inet routers run DD-WRT/Lucy with a GL.Inet user interface layered over it. It's not necessarily dead simple for end users who have never set up a VPN before. But the products are very good. And travel routers have other benefits, too. There are other travel routers that support VPNs, made by the major manufacturers. GL.Inet are just very good value. But if you're more novice, go with a TPLink, or Netgear travel router, for example, and be sure to verify it supports the flavor of VPN that you intend to use.

Travel router benefits:

  • Often better antennas than your phone and laptop have built in, so they can connect to the campground WIFI with a stronger connection.
  • Along the same lines, I can position my travel router high in the trailer, at whichever end of the trailer is closest to the campground WIFI antenna. That way I don't have to fiddle with trying to position each device perfectly to draw in more signal from that distant antenna.
  • VPN tunnel
  • All your devices only need to remember the travel router. You connect the router to the CG WIFI once, and all your devices will benefit without doing additional per-device connections, after first-time setup. I really like this. I can connect my travel router in a hotel, do the captive portal thing, and then all my other devices just start working because I already connected them to the travel router from the comfort of home when I first set it up. Then I can go somewhere else, and the same thing happens; connect the travel router, and all the other devices just start working.
  • Sharing the WIFI connection means you bypass device limits. Many hotels limit you to one or two devices unless you pay extra. If you only connect the travel router to the hotel, and all your devices connect to the router, the hotel only sees a single device.
If I know I'm going to have campground WIFI, I always bring my little travel router. I have this one: https://www.amazon.com/GL-iNet-GL-A...sr_1_4?keywords=gl.inet&qid=1638901171&sr=8-4
 

LilRed

Super Active Member
Jan 9, 2021
1,198
Long Island NY
It's a setup in most slightly higher priced routers. You won't find it in most sub 100 routers (GLI.net routers excluded) . Also if you do have a router that does have the capability, make sure the VPN throughput is adequate for your needs. OpenVPN has a pretty high overhead, and benefits from routers which have an Aes-ni built in.

I don't think it's worth securing your connection to home unless you have data at home you need
Spoiler alert - I am a bit of a networking guy, so my setup is probably more complex and pricey then most would want. But, I have been eyeing some built in 'easy button' for friends who want to dabble with using their home connection as the VPN host and a decent asus router. Asus VPN software supports OpenVPN, IPSec, and (sadly) PPTP. I trust my connection from my home ISP to be 'secure', but there is always a MitM potential. I don't have lightning fast ISP, but it's got at least 30Mbps upload which is the limiting factor if tunneling from the insecure public interweb of a coffee shop or airport back onto the net; and yes it does also allow me access to my firewalled NAS/other LAN only items. VPN also worked well with precovid international travels and using N*tflix streaming in the past.

Asus Instaguard app seems like a really quick way to link to a home host for a network noob. And, if you're looking to take a second router on the road, you can pre-build a VPN client (and in MOST reasonable routers) into the box for full automatic protection, even in a repeater mode.
 

Patrick w

Active Member
Aug 13, 2021
652
30mbps upload is more than enough if your running OpenVPN on non dedicated VPN hardware, especially on a multi function router/wifi/VPN combo. The Asus rt86 some say can get 200... But I don't know if that's 200/up or 200 down. I have I gbps, but I actually run a separate hardware VPN and just have the port forward to it. This way the router only handles router stuff. I segment the networks.
Wireguard is much leaner and meaner (though lack some routing stuff). It's also not an accepted standard yet. So some stuff I will still use open VPN but I'm fairly happy with wireguard.
I'm less thrilled with wifi security.

However wireguard does run really well with the gli mini routers, and have great throughout speeds.

Campground wifi is a hit or miss. But so is my cell service.
 
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SourGuy1

New Member
Aug 31, 2022
1
I once decided to test several of the most famous VPNs: NordVPN, SpeedVPN, and Private Internet Access (PIA). And in my opinion, NordVPN was the most effective and convenient since it provides the greatest chance for a quick search for whitelisted IPv4 addresses. In contrast, others lagged behind this indicator and constantly issued spam IP addresses. But then I got tired of always having to spend a long time looking for whitelisted IP addresses and tried to buy residential ip. And so I bought a proxy and realized that it's much more efficient and faster than any VPN!
 
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Patrick w

Active Member
Aug 13, 2021
652
Thats good if your purpose of vpn is to try and be more anonymous online. You'd have to trust they the VPN provider isnt taking data out of the protocol layers for analysis. Or the other main reason is to access bit torrents, streaming services, etc... Which are often even blocked by the isp.

For me it's often the immediate connection over wifi which you question the security and connection.

I once decided to test several of the most famous VPNs: NordVPN, SpeedVPN, and Private Internet Access (PIA). And in my opinion, NordVPN was the most effective and convenient since it provided the greatest chance for a quick search for whitelisted IPv4 addresses.
 

darthRudolph

Member
Aug 8, 2022
42
IE, CA, US, Earth
I use ProtonVPN when I don’t trust public Wi-Fi, though I’m way more likely to just not use any public Wi-Fi

NordVPN still seems legit from what I’ve read

I couldn’t bring myself to trust PIA anymore. That one and a few others were bought out by Kape. Kape is a re-branding of a company that produced Crossrider, basically a man-in-the-middle software that let its users easily perform malware injection on their users.

Personally I use WireGuard to access my home network. Runs on one of the servers at home, and on a Linode vps so I can get through my isp’s cgnat, then WG app on my iPad and phone. The laptop then can connect to either of those hotspots. Also lets me use my home dns (and ad blocker) from anywhere

Tailscale or zerotier would allow the same without having to pay for/admin a vps in the middle, but those companies effectively are the vps, so you’d be trusting them just like any other vpn company (as far as I know they haven’t done anything to make them untrustworthy)
 




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