What’s the deal with these campers!!

Discussion in 'PopOut (Hybrids)' started by cmspence, Aug 5, 2019.

  1. cmspence

    cmspence Member

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    i been on mission for last 2 months driving mile after mile , going through cities I never heard of find a camper. I ask all the questions and get all the right response .
    Me “ any leaks or soft spots “
    Them “ it’s in pristine condition “
    traveling for hrs over hrs
    What do I find ? Every single one is rotted!!! Roof ,walls to soft spots in floors .. my question is are campers junk after 3yrs ? I’m not being funny, but I looked at 05- to 2011 and not one was in good shape .. has me little nervous when or if a find one, how long will it last ? It’s crazy . I know the campers I been looking at are around 9-14 yrs old. Is that the life span?
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2019
  2. joet

    joet Well-Known Member

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    Its called lack of maintaince
     
  3. eoleson1

    eoleson1 Well-Known Member

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    I was looking at hybrids a while back. There are two types of bunk latches used on them. I'll call them the screw style and the lever style.
    2019-08-06_07h27_43.png 2019-08-06_07h28_07.png

    From what I gather, the screw style was really prone to leakage, but that issue improved with the introduction of the lever style. Like you, every one that I looked at had rot in the front wall and/or the front floor. Some were "repaired" some were not. I believe every one had the screw style bunk latch. The lever style started to appear in the 2010 model year I think.
     
  4. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    Sadly campers are made with cheap/lightweight material, heck on my parents TT they used plastic for the sink and faucet. So on these campers maintenance can be high to fix broken parts. Not to mention you still have seams that need to be caulked but sadly many owners either don’t want to bother or ignore it because it’s too much trouble. As mentioned above the latches were a big issue In prior model years and if some leaked, many owners either didn’t know how to fix delamination or rot that formed and may have just ignored it or attempted a bandaid fix. As far as the lies, that is sadly very common. People will say anything if they think they will get a sale. Can’t even trust the professionals. It is very sad reality, but they don’t make anything like they used to.
     
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  5. silvermickey2002

    silvermickey2002 Morris County, NJ

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    If folks would do routine maintenance and fix things when they need fixing then campers would last much longer. When you let a roof leak go for a few years the damage is done!

    I agree, some of the materials they use are crap. Plastic faucets for example. After about 5-6 years I had to replace ours on the sink. I replaced it with a nice Delta unit. It cost about $50, but it will last a lot longer then the factory faucet that came in the pup.
     
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  6. rjhammetter

    rjhammetter Husband, Dad, Engineer & Camper

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    This is true and my theory is computers are the cause for this. Most stuff (infrastructure, consumer goods, machinery, etc) pre-1990 was designed by formulas, codes and conservative assumptions. There are concrete bridges, foundations and buildings out there that will last until the world stops spinning. After 1990, computers and software enabled engineers and techs to basically design to the gnats ass, eliminate all excess and save costs. Everything these days, from your house to your laptop, is built faster and cheaper. Plus we live in a disposable society where no one fixes anything anymore. Have you ever tried to find a TV or vacuum repair place recently? They barely exist anymore.

    HTT by nature have more water ingress potential than a TT. OP, if you're concerned about water damage and not having success in the HTT realm, why not consider a TT?
     
  7. silvermickey2002

    silvermickey2002 Morris County, NJ

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    ^We originally wanted to replace our pup with a Hybrid. But the more we read to more we steered clear of hybrids for that water issue. Now we are down to a TT or Class A or C
     
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  8. RockyRoo

    RockyRoo Just because you CAN doesn't mean you SHOULD

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    This is one of the primary reasons I only buy new, there is no question about how it was maintained. If there is a lack of maintenance it is no one's fault but mine.
     
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  9. cuppajoe

    cuppajoe New Member

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    Have you thought about looking at older campers? Our first pup was 30 years old but the previous owners had taken great care of it. Older campers can be fewer and farther between (at least in my area), but when they do come along they've often been well cared for.
     
  10. CamperChrissy

    CamperChrissy Well-Known Member

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    I agree, I found the same thing when we were briefly considering a HTT. Seems like anything close to our budget had water damage, usually around the front bunk. We quickly gave up that idea and decided a HW PUP was right for us. Easier to find one in decent condition (i.e. no water damage).
     
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  11. bikendan

    bikendan Active Member

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    we had our 2007 Roo 23SS for 10 years and inside it looked nearly new. the outside graphics flaked off but the exterior was sound with no delam. sold it for 55% of what we paid for it new.
    BUT i did maintenance on mine and kept up with it. so as far as i know, it's still be used now by the family that bought it.
    the problem is that few keep up the maintenance on their RVs, hybrid or not.
    we also prefer new for a couple of reasons.
    one-most don't take care of their RVs, so it's very hard to find used ones in good shape.
    two-most think their used RV is worth more than it really is. we've found that we can get a new one, for what a comparable good used one is being sold for.
     

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