What changes when your dog comes camping?

Discussion in 'Camping with Kids/Pets' started by TheBlurb, May 22, 2021.

  1. OR_scott

    OR_scott New Member

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    I’ve got a big dog so it’s not an issue for me. But with small and ‘toy’ size dogs you might be real careful leaving them outdoors unattended at all even tied to a lead or fenced area. I’m the PNW there are many birds and or small animals that could snatch a loved dog real quick.
    I often wilderness camp and one day I got busy and my boxer must have felt neglected (for 5 min) and took off and found some cows to chance. This was on open range land owned by the NFS. I know. My bad. But he came back quickly and he looked to have had so much fun. They really wore him out. But waking up to cows is kind of a frequent thing in an open range situation.
     
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  2. Arlyn Aronson

    Arlyn Aronson Well-Known Member

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    Our dogs are everywhere with us, including church. We camp where they can be along. Lots and lots of photos doing that can be found on the dogs blog. We in general don't use leads, but they are trained to do that. Gromit meets friends in church.jpg wally gromit ski106.jpg
     
  3. Gena Dwyer

    Gena Dwyer Member

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    Some dogs like to bolt the moment you open the camper door, so training them to stay put until you say "okay" is really important. It'll help with you not getting pulled out of the camper by their leash as they take off or with their making a mad dash to run before you're prepared. My dog sits at the door until I say "okay" and then sits and waits on the ground until I get out of the camper (I learned the hard way). I also use a cable rope tied to two trees and then attach her harness to the cable. This gives her plenty of room to move and prevents entanglement.

    I also have a radio collar on my dog. She's good and I'm diligent, but the thought of a momentary mistake on my part if she dashes off after a chipmunk, squirrel, or bunny is too horrifying.
     
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  4. Arlyn Aronson

    Arlyn Aronson Well-Known Member

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    All dogs should be trained to not pass through any door, without permission. Its not all that hard to do, and its so, so much safer for the mutts. :shocked:
     
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  5. aan1129

    aan1129 Member

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    Just a side note - some campgrounds won’t let you tie anything to trees so have a back up plan
     
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  6. firepit

    firepit Well-Known Member

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    We use the stakes that screw into the ground just in case a tree isn't in a good location anyways.
    That way you can dial in your leashes so they aren't tangling up the leashes.
    With 2 dogs we never seem to be able to use multiple trees with their water bowl in between them anyway.
     
  7. SheaLoner

    SheaLoner Member

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    Agree with the long line leash. And a screw in anchor. Also remember a short lead as well, if you are just taking a quick stroll a regular 6ft leash is much easier to handle. Carabiner clips are great for if you need hands free control. Just clip the lead to your belt. I have a wire exercise pen that folds flat, easy to store that way, and its good for onsite off leash time.
     
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  8. Sotovoce

    Sotovoce Active Member

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    Find a way to fit his crate and the three children in the camper at least at night since he's accustomed to sleeping there. The crate is his place and he will feel more comfortable in it. We have another small dog, a Shitsu, who is currently two years old. He wants to be close to us and he's too small to get up on a camper bed so he sleeps on a pet pad as close to our bed as possible.

    For the daytime a long leash is nice. Most campgrounds where we have stayed limit the leash to 6'. His leashes were 4' so I looped two together and just scoop up some of the slack when needed. Our daughter's family also has a fence corral for their dogs. It is really nice when we camp together.

    Pack some poop bags. When camping with the puppy I always have one in my pocket. I should put a poop bag pouch the attaches to the dog leash on my gift wish list.

    The biggest difference we have noticed between camping without a pet and camping with one is while traveling. At rest stops we need to take turns going inside so one of us is with our puppy and we need to walk and water him.
     
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  9. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    The biggest change will be that someone has to miss out on things or you have to take turns doing and seeing things.. or you have to find a doggie daycare..
     
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  10. Zephyr

    Zephyr Active Member

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    We put the water dish in the same location every time so the dogs know where to look for it. Ours always sits by the pup tire.
    Our steps are covered with with rugs so the dogs don't catch a claw in the drainage holes.
    We converted an underbed cabinet into the dogs' bed. The cabinet door stays open at night, but they have a fabric door flap to stop drafts. The flap is velcro'd on, so removable in hot weather and for washing.
    DH attached eyebolts to the front and back stabilizers on the curb side. We use carabiners to attach the dogs' retractable leashes to the eyebolts when we are in campgrounds.
     
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  11. neighbormike

    neighbormike Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    What changes? The dog pees on the galley floor instead of the kitchen floor. [:D]
     
  12. firepit

    firepit Well-Known Member

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    The biggest change for us is...They pass gas in a more confined area![:D]
    If we couldn't take the dogs we just wouldn't go.
     
  13. suzhahm

    suzhahm New Member

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    Great advice! We never leave our dog alone at campsite. If she isnt allowed, we don't go either.
     
  14. RobertDivine

    RobertDivine New Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Don't know about other states but Georgia state parks specify a six-foot leash. I got 21 stitches in hands and arms from a German Shepherd on a 20 foot leash in a Georgia state park.. Lucky I did not fall down, in which case my face would have been ripped apart. I STILL love dogs! Dog owners must be responsible for their dogs!
     
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  15. Snow

    Snow Well-Known Member

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    My dogs use a 20ft leash at home and while camping.. but while camping we tie it off where they cannot get within 10ft of any adjacent site, trail, path, or road..
     
  16. Dave J B

    Dave J B New Member

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  17. Dave J B

    Dave J B New Member

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    Thanks so much for this. We have 2 wonderful dogs that LOVE people, but are protective against other dogs. I REALLY have a problem with how presumptuous other dog owners can be and allow their dogs to wander without a leash. (This is why some beaches are bad for our dogs but also in other settings with naive or entitled owners).
    We are in the market for a PopUp now but are concerned that we will be limited in our ability to dine out, etc..
     
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  18. jmkay1

    jmkay1 2004 Fleetwood/Coleman Utah

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    The ability to dine out can be a problem if you are used to that. I personally only seek out places that have take out or may have outside seating that allow dogs. The latter seems to be quite rare sadly. I sometimes will stay at camp while the rest in my party go out and they just bring something back for me when they are done. Not fun, but you make it work. Some camp neighbors may be willing to watch your dogs if you need to head out. I did that for a fellow neighbor. He gave his number and left his camper door open in case I needed to go in to calm his dogs. There are times though it may be easier to leave your dogs at home. Most trips my dogs come, but there have been some I just found a dog sitter.

    Good luck with your search! My dogs took to the popup like it was their own personal jungle gym.
     
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  19. Arlyn Aronson

    Arlyn Aronson Well-Known Member

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    They need to be socialized. Its that, and nothing else.
     
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  20. scollins

    scollins Member

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    We camp with our Irish wolfhound. He is 160lbs and stands 6’10 on his hind legs. Camping with a dog is like camping with another kid. Make sure they have they’re flea and tick treatment a few days before you go. We crate trained Moose but do never bring the crate with us camping. We found that the enclosed space of the camper seems to feel like a crate to him. He settles right down. Definitely keep it on a leash at the campground. Ours is really good about staying right next to us but as a curtesy to everyone, we keep him leashed. Always important to be mindful that other people may not be dog people. Moose is pretty unique so we get lines 10-15 people long waiting to pet him at campgrounds.

    If you are worried about your pup running away, they make proximity fences that could be helpful. It’s kind of like an invisible fence but you don’t have to bury any wires. Another good suggestion we wish we would have had was to buy about 4ft of lightweight chain to go from the long line to the collar. This will prevent your pup from chewing through their long line and taking off.

    the bottom line is, our dog is a member of our family. We camp for a month at a time in the summer and can’t imagine leaving him at home. We also camped with a wolfhound and an Airedale for a few years. The only issue with more than one is their lines getting tangled. Another option is a dog run. They make long lines that attach to two trees above the ground with a pulley. Prevents tangling.
     
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