What does an outside battery feed inside a new trailer if off-grid?

Discussion in 'Power - Site Power/Batteries/Generators/Solar' started by geogol, Feb 18, 2018.

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  1. geogol

    geogol New Member

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    Hi All,
    After reading my manual for the trailer and spending 3 hours reading this forum I am still confused.
    if I am off-grid but my outside battery is fully charged, will it provide electricity to outlets inside trailer? to fridge? and to heated mattersses and to fridge? I understand once i am on grid my battery is charged if hooked up to converter? I undestand I would need to upgradeit to 31 and buy a solar panel. Do I need inverter installed inside for the appliancers or converter will do the job and it is all prewired inside. I have Viking 2107 of 2013. Sorry I am a beginner and have my learning curve.
    thanks for your help

    Thank you!
     
  2. jnc

    jnc Welcome from New Hampshire

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    Ot will not power the household outlets. It will power the Fridge, Furnace, Lights, o2 detectors. I have no knowledge of the heater mattress but my guess is it will.
     
  3. BikeNFish

    BikeNFish Well-Known Member

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    The battery supplies power to a fridge, lights, furnace, vent fan, water pump, propane detector, electric brakes and an electric lift system. The fridge, fan and furnace will drain the battery in a hurry and is not recommended to use it on a full time use for these.

    My heated mattresses plug into the electrical outlets so, no, they do not use the battery power.

    No need to apologize for being a "beginner". I have camped all my life and I am still learning, especially since I joined Popup Portal. The Portal is a great place to learn for beginners and experts.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2018
    Strawhouse likes this.
  4. gardenbliss

    gardenbliss Well-Known Member

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    When you are boondocking, your battery will charge all 12V appliances (lights, fan, blower on heater, USB chargers...). Your refrigerator should ALWAYS run off of your propane when camping off grid. It uses very little propane to run the fridge, but will drain your battery faster than anything, so make sure it is switched over to propane when off grid. When plugged in to 110, run fridge on battery. There are lots of 12V appliances you can check out if you google them. The battery will run all of these. If you are boondocking for extended periods of time, consider getting a solar charger (I have a 100W Renogy Solar Suitcase), and you can camp indefinitely without plugging in, unless you live in a rainy city.
     
  5. theseus

    theseus Centerville, OH

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    If your plugged in to 110v (AC power), I think it would be better to run the fridge on AC power, not battery. In my mind, DC or battery power is for while you drive to your camping site. But as Gardenbliss said, propane is the best energy source bondocking for your fridge.

    Everybody has questions, so you've come to the right place..
     
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  6. gardenbliss

    gardenbliss Well-Known Member

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    Oops, yes, that's what I meant. It's best never to run your fridge on battery power, it drains it too quickly. Thanks for catching my mistake.
     
  7. roybraddy

    roybraddy Well-Known Member

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    GEOGOL - I sure have been busy around here today and finally got set down with a early evening cup of coffee hehe...

    I may have answered some of your questions about what works on Shore Power and what works just using the battery in another thread... Now I am confused hehe... Most all of the RV units have RV camping in mind and have them all setup with this idea in mind running off of shore power at an electric camp ground pedestal or from a generator set... Then they also have all of the bare camping setups from an on-board battery so you can camp off the grid without too much effort.... To be really successful however you will need to change your high DC current automotive incandescent interior light bulbs to LED boards and add additional batteries to your battery bank. Of course the very large RV Units like the Motohomes etc will have more things setup for living in them full time and they will be setup more sustained like a house on wheels... This gets expensive real quick but this is what alot of RV TRAVELERS like to do it having all the comforts of home with them...

    The larger units are also setup for RV Traveling mode verses RV Camping mode.

    I am a RV Camper and most of my camping is localized within a couple of hundred miles around here in Virginia... I never got the RV TRAVELING bug hehe... My idea is to wake up in the mornings camping creekside somewhere to a nice camp fire going and watching the fish jump in the creek. Sure makes those first cups of good ole fresh ground and brewed bean coffee taste so good hehe... This is almost exactly what I used to do tent camping back in the 50s except now I am up off the ground abit and have a few modern appliances to use.

    This is us camping off-grid in OKLA at the Wichita Mtns Wildlife Refuge near Medicine Park. OKLA.. All is running off the battery bank that gets recharged at 8Am the next morning using my 2KW Honda generator. The only facilities around here is a bath room building somewhat close by. Sure has a nice fishing lake just around the corner hehe...
    [​IMG]
    Roy's image

    I see you are still asking some of the same questions haha...

    Hopefully you got all of my answers or maybe I rambled on too much and got you even more confused. I am confused all the time here haha...

    Roy Ken
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Mat Kyne

    Mat Kyne Member

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    I hope I can add some clarity to this question.
    For most Pop-ups, a 110 Volts AC electrical connection is needed to power the electrical outlets in your camper. The shore power connection is directly wired to the power converter. Mine takes the 110 Volt (30 amp) AC power and splits it to 2 or more circuits, each with their own circuit breaker; and at the same time the power converter converts the 110 Volts AC power into 12 Volts DC. This converted 12 Volts DC is used to power the lights, fans, heater, water pump, smoke/CO2 and propane detectors and charge the 12 Volt battery. If you are not plugged into shore power, the power converter becomes more of a power distribution block, as all the power is taken from the 12 Volt battery. Your 110 Volt AC plugs will be dead. If you have to have 110 Volts AC power, you need to get an inverter. An inverter will take the 12 Volts DC power source (battery) and create 110 Volt AC. These are not very efficient, so some energy is wasted as heat in the process.
     
  9. davido

    davido Active Member

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    It will NOT power the interior 115VAC outlets.

    It will NOT power the fridge in 115VAC mode, or even in 12v mode for more than a couple hours (You should be switching the fridge over to propane mode -- it will run on propane for three weeks).

    It will NOT power the heated mattresses.

    It will NOT power your air conditioner (if you have one).


    It WILL power the blower on your furnace (but the heat comes from propane).

    It WILL power the water pump.

    It WILL power the water heater's automatic ignition solenoid (but the heat comes from propane).

    It WILL power your interior and porch lights.

    It WILL power any 12v outlets you may have.

    It COULD power a 115VAC inverter, but not for very long, and only for light loads.

    It WILL power the FanTastic Fan.

    It WILL power the fridge's rear vent fan (if so equipped).

    It WILL power the radio.

    It WILL power the roof winch (if so equipped).


    If you need 115VAC for moderate loads or prolonged periods, you will need a generator or shore power.

    You may need a second battery, or a much larger battery if you intend to operate the furnace more than a couple nights.
    Solar is always useful for off-grid campers.
     
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  10. geogol

    geogol New Member

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    Hi Davido,

    Thank you so much!
     

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