What if gas stays high?

Discussion in 'Tow Vehicles, Hitch & Towing' started by ktn, Jun 3, 2008.

  1. ktn

    ktn New Member

    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2007
    Some think the price of gasoline is a bubble, some think $4 a gallon is here to stay and some think it will go much higher.

    Let us assume it stays at $4 a gallon or more; what happens?

    I don't want this to be a rant thread about gas prices, but some serious thought about the investment we have in pups and how limiting a factor this is. GM shut down four truck factories today and said they will sell off or cease producing Hummers. The F-150 has gone from 17 consecutive years of being the best selling vehicle in America to the 5th best selling vehicle.

    This is not just a matter of what a camping trip cost us, but future tow vehicles as well. Vehicles that twenty-five years ago were four cylinders are now sixes, sixes became eights. Tow ratings went way up.

    Now it would appear that 1200 mile camping trips over the summer will require substantial financial investment. Maybe for some of you that is a long ways, but that is three days in a neighboring state for me (Wyoming or New Mexico).

    On the one hand I can see pups getting more popular as they gain buyers who would of gone for hardsided travel trailers. On the other hand, I can see smaller pups making a comeback so as to be towed by much smaller and less powerful vehicles. On the third hand maybe interest in any sort of RV declines to the point where they are no longer worth producing.

    I am fortunate in that I have two motorcycles worthy of long distance travel and I simply must get out and see the world, but what are the long term changes here?

    Keith and Claire
    2006 Tacoma
    2007 Palomino P283
    "History is not just cruel. It is witty."
     
  2. Yooperwannabe

    Yooperwannabe Active Member

    Messages:
    1,976
    Likes Received:
    10
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Location:
    Clinton, Illinois
    High gas prices are here to stay. Technoglogy will take over and soon there will be TV that require no gas so that we can pull our pups and all will live happily ever after.

    Robin

    Me 1955, DH 1958, DD 1986
    DGS 1999,2000,2001,2005
     
  3. EBR

    EBR New Member

    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2007
    To me it is still money well spent. Hopefully my boys will continue to want to go camping/fishing and generally loving the outdoors. Memories and respect tor the outdoors are priceless.

    As gas prices raise maybe more people will decide to "camp" instead of hauling their oversized homes on wheels to campgrounds with huge gas guzzling tow vehicles. To me personally that is not camping. I think/hope POP UPs might actually become even more popular.

    BTW, I just filled my van @ $1.33(CDN)per liter.

    2001 Montana,1989 Starcraft NOVA
    ME,My WIFE,and 2 BOYS
     
  4. ktn

    ktn New Member

    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2007
    I agree it is money well spent; I only live ten minutes from the mountains and can camp in quite a lovely spot and burn less than two gallons of gas roundtrip. However, things are going to change. I am just curious as to how people think they might change long term.

    Keith and Claire
    2006 Tacoma
    2007 Palomino P283
    "History is not just cruel. It is witty."
     
  5. Digger

    Digger Foothills of Central Virginia

    Messages:
    2,806
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2007
    Location:
    Foothills of Central Virginia
    1.33(CDN) per Liter = (roughly) $5.35 (USD) per gallon.

    I've been saying for awhile that I think the lighter tent trailers that are very common in Europe will become more popular here....

    <img src="http://inlinethumb27.webshots.com/39642/2561811610102683349S600x600Q85.jpg" border=0>

    Yep, it's a tent trailer...and really light!

    <img src="http://inlinethumb55.webshots.com/1334/2115354140102683349S600x600Q85.jpg" border=0>

    ~Cheers~ Ðigger
    2004 Fleetwood Westlake - StonyBlue
    2002 Econoline E-150
     
  6. ktn

    ktn New Member

    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2007
    Digger -

    A) That does not look fun to set up
    B) If you set that up on a typical 60 MPH wind gust Wyoming afternoon, it would be in Nebraska by dark!

    Other than that, it is kind of cool!

    Keith and Claire
    2006 Tacoma
    2007 Palomino P283
    "History is not just cruel. It is witty."
     
  7. Tiger Nick

    Tiger Nick New Member

    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    We were originally looking for a small PUP (6' box) that we could pull with a Honda CR-V. We later decided that we'd have to get something bigger, because that was what was available in our price range.
    I recently looked at a PUP dealer website, and they are HHUUUGE Compaired to anything I've seen. high walls, double axles, built in refrigerators.

    Doesn't seem that people want simple pop ups anymore. I bet that will change, though.
    -Nick

    --
    '89 Starcraft Starmaster PUP
    K C 8 H K I - Amateur Radio Operator
    Cumming, GA
     
  8. ktn

    ktn New Member

    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2007
    I do agree lighter and smaller trailers would seem to be the way to go; but is there enough of a profit margin to manufacture and sell them in the good old U.S. of A.?

    Keith and Claire
    2006 Tacoma
    2007 Palomino P283
    "History is not just cruel. It is witty."
     
  9. becasunshine

    becasunshine New Member

    Messages:
    384
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    I usually try to stay away from any discussion in which I:

    a. Cannot speak in platitudes or pleasantries, or
    b. Cannot solve or resolve it with the use of a calculator, or
    c. Cannot reference someone with more experience than myself (not a difficult task, that) and hopefully that experienced someone has put their expertise in print.

    I'm gonna jump right in here- highly uncharacteristic of me- and prognosticate.

    I think we are in the waning days of the petroleum age. What comes next? I have no idea.

    I've read some works that allude to the petroleum age as a magical time that will be hard to maintain, extend or replicate due to the loss of the combustion engine. Pound for pound, few things give us the work force of a combustion engine, and those few things are quite difficult for private citizens to haul around on a daily basis: nuclear reactors, hydroelectric plants, etc.

    I would love to have my own personal hydroelectric plant, for instance. How cool would that be? A huge dam, a big lake and all the toaster pastries I can toast, all in one big happy package! Plus I can charge up my (yet to be acquired) electric scooter! but I don't think anyone is going to let me have my own personal hydroelectric plant. <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_sad.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Sad"> Even though I would share with y'all... I would... we could all camp around my huge lake...

    Coal may be our next great hope, and we have an abundance of it. Oil can be processed from coal from what I understand, but that process is energy-intensive in and of itself.

    Oil is going to be an ever more scarce global commodity. Unless some miracle technology that can replace the petroleum fired combustion engine is indeed waiting in the wings, and I'm beginning to wonder if it is, we may be in for an interesting few decades.

    When one looks at the trappings of one's modern life, petroleum products are <i><b>everywhere,</i></b> not just in our gas tanks and oil furnaces. It's not just a matter of powering our personal go-mobiles. The ever growing demand for limited petroleum resources is going to reach quite far into our lives.

    My fondest hope is that we, as a nation and as a world, begin an orderly transition away from a petroleum based economy, a petroleum based society, while there is still time to do so in a peaceful and cooperative fashion.

    Of course, this supposes that there is an alternative energy platform onto which we can transition.

    My worst nightmare is that we will stay in denial for too long, as a nation and as a world, and that our transition will be anything but orderly and cooperative.

    All that being said, and back on topic, there may be dips and plateaus in the price of gasoline but overall, I think the price of gasoline will only rise, and take the rest of energy costs with it.

    Even energy produced by other means (hydroelectric, nuclear, coal) has some basis in the petroleum industry. If nothing else, combustion engines are used to move much of the raw materials.

    I don't know much about hydrogen powered vehicles. I've read that managing hydrogen fuel is problematic but I don't know if technology has solved or is on the way to solving those issues.

    Battery operated cars and trucks offer some alternative but those batteries are darned heavy. I don't know if it would be possible to carry enough batteries to move a truck <i><b>and</b></i> tow a light trailer. The weight of the batteries alone may be self-limiting.

    Was I thinking about all of these things when we bought our PUP? Yes, not quite as deeply as I'm thinking about them now, but yes, these ideas weren't foreign to me.

    I was darned sure thinking about them when we traded in the 4 cylinder Tacoma for the 6 cylinder 4Runner.

    Good for us, the 4Runner gets just about the same gas mileage as the Tacoma did. Must be something about the aerodynamics of an SUV vs. a pick up truck. I don't know, so don't quote me on that.

    We are "outdoors" people, so we will continue to camp in some form for as long as we can get ourselves out into the woods, to the mountains or to the shore.

    We'll go back to tent camping in a heartbeat if that's what it takes.

    We are fortunate to live in a place with wonderful state parks and lots of areas to enjoy the outdoors within a reasonable distance from our home.

    But yes, back on topic, I think we will see a reversal of the "bigger is better" trend across the board- cars, trailers, commutes, homes even- as the reality of energy costs sinks in collectively.

    What an odd, interesting moment in history, and I mean that on a personal level. (Because it's All About Me. <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Big Smile">)

    I remember clearly, sitting in high school, listening to a history teacher go on and on about The Industrial Revolution, and how it was predicated by the invention of the combustion engine. How this remarkable age in human history was so recent and almost instantaneous. How the combustion engine changed <i><b>everything</i></b> with its huge capacity for work.

    I remember thinking, "Yeah, and? So now we are here. Why is this so remarkable?"

    At that point in my life I was literally <i><b>surrounded</i></b> by combustion engines: I had relatives who worked on them for a living, I was no stranger to the smell of gasoline and oil. Others in my family and neighborhood worked on their own cars, motorcycles, boat motors, lawnmowers, minibikes, etc. like I vacuum a floor. Friends my age owned boats, motorcycles, cars, and even flew airplanes.

    Combustion engines occupied every corner of my life.

    Oh, the naivete and self-assuredness of youth. Little did I imagine that a mere 30 something years down the road I might be looking at the last days of the combustion engine as we know it.

    That's a whole lot to happen to a society in a short period of time. I do wonder how this is all going to work out.

    Back to PUPs. Gonna keep ours as long as we can afford to tow it. It doesn't seem to impact the 4Runner's gas mileage that much. We keep the 4Runner parked for the vast majority of the time that we are not towing.

    After that, who knows? But I suspect that, when that time comes, PUPs will be the least of our concerns.

    Him/Her Late Boomer Vintage
    Two Wonderful Sons, Grown and Out!
    One Non-Camping Cat
    2007 Fleetwood Rio "Matilda" <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_pu.gif border=0 align=middle alt="PopUp">
    2004 Toyota 4Runner "Joey 2" <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_suv.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Tow Vehicle">

    Edited by - becasunshine on June 04 2008 01:36:50
     
  10. catedrew

    catedrew New Member

    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    Beca - Great Post - and echoes my sentiments exactly - only you are more eloquent than I could have been!

    Catie

    Me:'60; DH:'51; DD1:'94; DD2 & DS:'00 (twins)
    '02 Coleman Utah CP, '04 Chevy Trailblazer
     
  11. Luv2ridebikes

    Luv2ridebikes New Member

    Messages:
    1,942
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2005
    Location:
    Granger, IN
    Great thoughts Beca. On the original subject - fuel costs will probably keep our camping ventures close to home. We are fortunate that the great lakes region offers an incredible diversity in camping venues. If we just had a real mountain range, it would be perfect!

    I have seen news articles from several states around here. Camping reservations are up at most of the state parks in southern MI, IN, WI and OH. Nice parks plus population density in close proximity are combining to keep the parks busy with budget minded vacationeers that want to have outdoor fun, but avoid travel. If this is any indicator, the greatest negative impact may be to CG's that depend on distant travelers. KOA comes to mind since so many of their campgrounds seem to be close to major highways and depend upon RV'rs in transit.

    DW has family out west and I don't see us camping with them. I travel a lot by air so most of our personal travel to see her family will continue to be air travel.

    On a positive note, we average less than 16,000 miles per year on both of our vehicles combined.

    Steve & Deb (boys are grown & gone)
    Aspen & Riley (the 4 legged children)
    05 Fleetwood Sequoia & lot's of bikes! <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_bike.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Bicycle"><img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_bike.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Bicycle">

    Edited by - scm46530 on June 04 2008 07:11:12

    Edited by - scm46530 on June 04 2008 07:12:38
     
  12. Yellowkayak

    Yellowkayak Popups.....when sleeping on the ground gets to you

    Messages:
    2,198
    Likes Received:
    10
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    What its going to come down to is the rich will be able to travel because they have no sense of value, the poor could never travel to start with, and the middle class will either become poorer, or become richer and will travel if they become rich.

    As far as pup go and evolution to them, I see them getting more smaller and more practical as far as lay up and design as well as lighter weight...but then there goes the price thru the roof. We are already paying more for smaller things, even though it cost a fraction of the cost as a large version of something does...greed again causing that!

    Auto-manufacturers keep saying they are coming out with vehicles that will get 100+ miles to the gallon, or all electric, but those are for commuting and they still don't solve the bottom line of the problem - cost. I watched the news last night and saw a three wheeled car that gets 300 MPG that will be produced in six months...the catch......$27,000 - $30,000....your average person cannot afford that. If they sell them for between $7 - 10, 000, then people can afford to buy one, and they would also sell many more then at a redicously high price.

    Changes...thats is what is coming folks, changes we may or may not like, and its really not up to us, but the greedy companies and manufacturers on what they want to put out there for us to buy.....anybody got a couple of good horses and a buggy to sell!!!!!!



    JJ

    Wichita Falls, TX
    USAF Retired
     
  13. lyz

    lyz New Member

    Messages:
    392
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Location:
    League City, TX
    No matter how expensive gas gets, towing a PUP is still cheaper than buying airline tickets, paying for a hotel and meals out and entertainment. All of those prices are increasing too as a result of the gas prices, so a PUP is still the less expensive means to a vacation.

    -lyz <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_smore.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Smores">
    Nights camped '08: 15
    '94 StarCraft Meteorite <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_pu.gif border=0 align=middle alt="PopUp">
     
  14. ktn

    ktn New Member

    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2007
    I don't know that I agree that we are at the end of the petroleum age. There is an abundance of oil available and significant new finds are happening almost monthly and primarily in the United States and friendly countries. We easily have enough oil to last one hundred more years just from known reserves. The price of oil, as of the moment, has nothing to do with supply and demand in the sense that Adam Smith defined.

    The tar sands in Alberta holds enough oil for the next hundred years by itself, the Governor of Montana this week said they have 40 billion barrels undrilled, North Dakota has a similar amount undrilled and eventually we will drill in ANWR with perhaps 100billion barrels undrilled.

    In other words, North American oil reserves may exceed that of Saudi Arabia. Not to mention Brazil has a new field with perhaps 100 billion more barrels.

    So, lack of reserves is not the problem and we certainly have not hit "peak oil"; just like we did not hit it in the 1950's or 1970's when the term was first used.

    Remember gasoline in Europe has consistently costs twice what it cost in the United States even though they pay the same for a barrel of oil as we do.

    But enough on that, while we are not at the end of the petroleum age we may be at the end of the cheap gas age due to other factors.

    Inevitably trailers must get lighter. I am old enough to remember the 1970's and how radically the demand in automobiles changed and just how many RV companies went under. I am curious about just where that is heading, I do not believe too many manufacturers of pups build only pups. I think most are also building motor homes and large travel trailers and that business has got to be hurting.

    Keith and Claire
    2006 Tacoma
    2007 Palomino P283
    "History is not just cruel. It is witty."
     
  15. ogeer3

    ogeer3 New Member

    Messages:
    1,115
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Prairie,TX,75052
    Yellowkayak,
    I saw that car. Some of the problems are
    It is only a 2 seater.
    It is very light weight and that is why it gets so high mileage. What happens when that very light vehicle goes up against a full size truck or SUV in an accident. As far as a TV it won't. You would be better off with a motorcycle and trailer to carry your tent.
    My camper has a 8' box plus storage trunk in front and when loaded it weighs in around 3000#. I can pull it with a 6cyl car (Jeep) but that is still an expensive proposition. I now have a V8 and the mileage pulling the camper is about the same as it was with the V6. Another problem I have is, living in the south it is very hot in the summer and the mountains of Colorado are a long way off. 150 gallons of gas at $4/gal ($600) just for fuel takes a big bite out of vacation any way you look at it. I don't know if we will get to go on vacation to the mountains this year or not because of DW health problems but if she can go we will bite the bullet at least one more time thanks to the governments stimulus tax refund.
    I don't know what my final answer will be.

    Otis
    '05 Silverado TV - '03 Skamper PU
    Grand Prairie, TX <img src=../Images/flags/us-army.jpg border=0 align=middle alt="US Army"> <img src=../Images/flags/us-powmia.jpg border=0 align=middle alt="POW/MIA">
     
  16. mountain cat

    mountain cat New Member

    Messages:
    58
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Profits are high these days for crude oil, and I can't imagine the owners of such business want to lower prices, that would mean less profit. Prices are high around the world. I think the prices are going to go even higher with each passing year. Hopefully, alternative fuels will be developed and vehicles made that use those. Make shorter trips, for sure. Fewer trips. Or take longer vacations and stay put in a camping area.

    Mountain Cat
    go here for pup project:
    http://s286.photobucket.com/albums/ll88/mountain--cat/starlite%20pup%20rebuild/?albumview=slideshow

    and here for my main blog about nature:
    http://sierra-nevada-ramblings.blogspot
     
  17. jwolfe01

    jwolfe01 Honeoye, NY

    Messages:
    779
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    Honeoye Falls, NY
    I have done hours upon hours of research on the causes of oil prices going through the roof in the last few years and here is what it boils down to: greed. There is no shortage of oil, it is not expensive to produce or refine and there are many many reserves out there that are going untapped. Why? Because years ago, some groups came up with a brilliant plan to do nothing more than make alot of money by playing on people's fears and to take advantage of a captive audience (so to speak). How do they do it? By taking the environmentalism cause to a different level. I am an avid outdoorsman and care deeply about the environment, but this "global warming" farce and the enormous "green" movement of the last few years is just plain ridiculous. Most of it is based on data taken over a very short time, way too short to try and make global climate change predictions. Think about this, in one large volcanic eruption, more greenhouse gasses are released into the atmosphere than civilization has released in its entire history. How exactly are people causing any "global warming"? They arent, the simple fact is that the environmental trends we are seeing is being caused by yet another natural cycle. This has happened more than once in earth's history. Yet some people continuously spew this doom and gloom theory of "if you dont go green, your carbon footprint is going to bring about the end of the world....". What better way to cash in on people's fears? Now they are "predicting" that current oil reserves are getting smaller, well duh, of course they are, but that does not mean that there are not many other sources of oil out there, and that also does not mean that we still dont have hundreds of years worth of oil left in the current reserves. What it does mean is that they have another excuse to take advantage of our fears. Oil has been taken out of the supply and demand market and turned into a commodities market, which is very easy to tamper with. Currently, the speculators that drive the prices for oil are allowed to buy oil commodities at less than 10% of their value. So what they do is to buy the commodities, then speculate about the futures and then sell the commodities at a highly inflated price before their contract on the commodity comes due. Sounds kind of like inside trading, doesnt it? Its the same thing, but they are getting away with it. If you look a bit more deeply into it, youll notice than in less than 10 years, all of the oil producing nations in the middle east (where the most production is) have come close to or completely paid off their national deficits. This is including Quatar, which should be in big time debit while they are building the largest man made islands that the world has ever seen. So who do you think has these speculators in their back pockets? Why did all of the major oil execs get up and publicly state that oil should not be selling for any more than @ $50 a barrel recently? More importantly, why arent these speculators being controlled? Why arent we able to tap unused oil reserves? Why cant we build more refineries to ramp up production? Why cant we now build more nuclear power plants (lowest production cost electricity there is)? The answer: greed. There is a long long line of people lining their pockets with our hard earned money, which brings me to the captive audience thing. We are the captive audience, we need oil to live, we need oil to eat. We will pay for it, no matter what the cost is. Everything we own, everything we use to survive on a daily basis depends on oil. If something is not done about the oil prices, we are all in deep doo doo. Food prices are just starting to go through the roof, many other products are rising too. What is the answer to the situation? It will take many things to occur, and it will not be a quick fix, but once the speculators are brought under control, the price of oil will drop pretty sharply. The insiders are already predicting oil to be below $100 a barrel before the end of the year. The trade commissions are already talking about the fact that they are beginning to look into the practices of the oil speculators. Is this really good news? That is yet to be seen, but as far as I can see it, it will be.

    Ok, Im stepping down from my soapbox lol.

    _________________________________________
    TV - 98 Jeep Cherokee Classic <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_jeep.gif border=0 align=middle alt="Jeep">
    PUP - 89 Starcraft Nova <img src=../Images/icons/icon_smile_pu.gif border=0 align=middle alt="PopUp">
    Lima NY
     
  18. ktn

    ktn New Member

    Messages:
    221
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2007
    You have nailed it on the head with speculators and price manipulations artifically creating demand via the futures market. Unfortunately for us the futures market for oil is primarily set in London, not the U.S. Consequently the ability of the U.S. to reign in price manipulation is limited.

    Keith and Claire
    2006 Tacoma
    2007 Palomino P283
    "History is not just cruel. It is witty."
     
  19. achurch2k

    achurch2k New Member

    Messages:
    302
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2006
    Location:
    Glendale, Arizona
    I think anyone who really knows what is going to happen is putting their money in droves into the leading companies stock portfolio. However, nobody does know.

    Fleetwood is selling their PU line. What does that mean, other than overall RV sales are down just like the auto market? And Fleetwood needs to show shareholders that they are actively trying to stop the bleeding of red ink. Are the PUs that Digger posted further up on tap widespread? Maybe. I'm not so sure though, as consumers we have become accustomed to certain luxuries that are tough to do without or change.

    Production of new technologies to power vehicles are difficult to come up with largely do to mass distribution problems. Petrol distribution is an exacting science and has been developing more than 100 years. Economically speaking you cannot shut off the oil spigot and turn on another in a short time. Gasoline has a LOT of energy packed in its size. And there are many more efficencies yet to be gained. Even if battery powered vehicles matched today's petrol fueled vehicles there are still environmental concerns about byproducts harming the environment and recycling issues.

    I am altogether not pleased about the fuel prices we are paying. However, I am excited about the buzzz going on, and we will likely become very invented and clever as a country US/Canada and find solutions. We are our best when we are pushed to our limits. Call me an optimist, but I think some really good technologies will come about from these times.

    2 cents worth.

    Alan

    1996 Coleman Cheyenne
    1999 VW Eurovan
    Janay+Hannah+Aidan
     
  20. PattieAM

    PattieAM New Member

    Messages:
    915
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2007
    As a result of the high petroleum prices, we will and are seeing all goods/services increase in price, and, at some point our counties, will be increasing taxes to offset the increased costs for our municiple services (police, highway crews, etc.).

    Knowing this will be coming, one needs to tighten the belt now, eliminating any/all unessential expenses or we will be seeing a dramatic increase in personal bankruptcies. Eliminating debt and credit cards will play an important part in our personal financial existance.

    As to camping - most of us need the 'get-aways' to avoid burnout, and to maintain our family relationships - it will be important to get the best bang for the buck....and compare costs of aspects of our get-aways and camping style. Example: Knowing I'd be spending $150 round trip in gas vs. what might have been $75 round trip just a year or so ago, to stay within my financial budget, I opted to camp at a no-frills location for $12.50/night...all I had were hookups (w/e/s) on my most recent trip. And, when meeting up with 'family', we only had one restaurant breakfast, and one restaurant dinner - and the dinner location was determined more by cost than by menu! (Ruby Tuesdays vs. Outback)
    We also utilized a more fuel efficient vehicle for our limited galivanting - rather than my gas guzzling tow vehicle. By keeping the total cost of the trip down, this will enable me to have future trips - budget wise. At home I've unbundled some services (satellite, phone, computer), gone back to dial-up for the computer, increased insurance deductibles to lower premiums, shop generic and try to shop once a month with weekly milk runs. Try to limit errands to one day a week and multiple stops vs. separate trips. Making payments via mail or online vs. drop offs (used to be cheaper). Reducing utility costs - use clothesline vs. 220 v. dryer, lowered thermostat for water heater, and utilizing microwave vs. oven whenever possible. Using pressure cooker vs. conventional cookery (less time/energy). Buying meats in bulk and repacking them at home. The list goes on- but you get the idea. I've eliminated the satellite for TV, so I can apply that $50+/month towards the increased gasoline costs. Reduced my cell phone plan to the minimum, and eliminated all services on the land-line phone - just basic phone service - no long distance (use the cell phone for it's 'free nights/weekends'). No more voice mail on the phone - have answering machine that is long since paid for.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.