What is your opinion? Can you use a dual receiver upside down?

Sherronlee

Active Member
Apr 10, 2020
116
Northern BC
We just got a new to us tow vehicle (Toyota Tundra). We have not connected our 2009 Fleetwood Bayside yet but I am pretty sure the hitch will be a lot higher than it was with our Honda Ridgeline. I have been looking for a way to bring my bike and have been contemplating the dual receiver. Never did it with the Ridgeline because we were too close to our towing limit but we have room to spare now. Bayside 3500 lbs ~ Tundra towing capacity 9800lbs.

My question is: Do you think a dual receiver is safe to use upside down?

The "top" half looks weaker then the bottom one, so I am hesitant to turn it upside down, giving me the lower one ~ which is actually the top receiver ~ to connect the trailer to and using the higher one ~ which is actually the bottom receiver ~ to attach a bike rack (for only one cruise bike).

What do you think? Would it be safe to do this?

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tfh715

Member
Apr 15, 2013
14
I tried the dual hitch out for the exact same reason. It was great until I got a bike pinched when backing the PUP into a tight spot one time. I had to remove the bikes while still hooked up and that was a pain. Not a good idea at all.

My solution was to get a front hitch for the bike rack. You see them all the time down south with a cooler platform and rod holders etc. I'd have the bikes on up front and it worked out great. I'd also use it for a platform and to push the PUP into the garage with much greater control.
 

Oldspurs

Active Member
Jan 2, 2022
276
Central Texas
Absolutely not, recipe for disaster. As stated a drop hitch is the best way to go. I have an adjustable drop hitch, with the interchangeable ball system, 1 7/8", 2", & 2 5/16". Has 8" max drop, it is heavy at 32#'s, 2.5" reciever. Strong, and stable, however I visually check the complete tow system, frame bolts, web welds, everyplace there might be a stress point, for cracks or damage once every spring. DW says I am a little OCD, have her fooled, I am a lot OCD. We can never be to careful, when we are towing. Enjoy your new TV. Enjoy the camp. See you on the trail.
 

Sherronlee

Active Member
Apr 10, 2020
116
Northern BC
No. Rule of thumb is that those things reduce your tongue weight pretty significantly. Use the bed for your bikes.

You will probably need a drop hitch if the truck is too high. Using a drop hitch in conjunction with an extender like that is a recipe for failure IMO.
Our towing capacity is 9800lbs. Trailer is 3500, so weight wise, I think we are good. I am just really having trouble finding a solution to carry my bike. The trailer was put away for the winter when we bought the truck, so I don't know for sure if we will need something lower. But when the new truck is parked beside the old truck, it is obviously higher.
 

Sherronlee

Active Member
Apr 10, 2020
116
Northern BC
Absolutely not, recipe for disaster. As stated a drop hitch is the best way to go. I have an adjustable drop hitch, with the interchangeable ball system, 1 7/8", 2", & 2 5/16". Has 8" max drop, it is heavy at 32#'s, 2.5" reciever. Strong, and stable, however I visually check the complete tow system, frame bolts, web welds, everyplace there might be a stress point, for cracks or damage once every spring. DW says I am a little OCD, have her fooled, I am a lot OCD. We can never be to careful, when we are towing. Enjoy your new TV. Enjoy the camp. See you on the trail.
I suspected this was not a good idea but still trying to find something that works for my bike.
 

kitphantom

Super Active Member
Platinum Supporting Member
Dec 26, 2009
13,929
Albuquerque, NM
There are multiple options to carry bikes. If you have enough tongue weight to spare, somethings like a Jack-it might work, assuming your frame will carry it. I looked into it for my friend's bike, for our TT, but it is a heavy mountains bike and we decided it would be too much for our old shoulders.
With the popups, we took the bike on a carrier on the back gate of our 4Runner, which made getting into the cargo area interesting on the road. In camp, the bike(s) were locked up, but we had the carrier if needed to drive to a trailhead.
We're lucky now with the small TT, when my husband takes his bike, it just travels strapped to the bed. That requires removing one pedal, so we weren't going to try that with my friend's new bike.
With the 4Runner as tow vehicle, we always had a Thule cargo box, so no room for him to carry the bike up there. We now have a truck, but the bed is too full to carry the bike.
 

Sjm9911

Super Active Member
May 31, 2018
12,450
Nj
Do you have room in the bed of the truck and get the mat that goes over the tailgate? Front truck receiver for bikes. Or just get the correct mount if you have the capacity covered. So many ways to carry bikes.
 

Sherronlee

Active Member
Apr 10, 2020
116
Northern BC
Do you have room in the bed of the truck and get the mat that goes over the tailgate? Front truck receiver for bikes. Or just get the correct mount if you have the capacity covered. So many ways to carry bikes.
We used to tow with a Ridgeline, so it was always full. We did just change to a Tundra, so there is more room but we have a canopy on it and I really don't like the idea of keeping it open for the drive. Pretty sure it would be very dirty in there by the time we got to where we are going. I am thinking of looking into this system. And because of how high it sits, I think I can connect the bike rack in a way that the bike (s) sit over the top of the storage trunk of trailer, instead of between the trailer and tow vehicle. Won't know for sure if that will work until I order it and try it out.


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