What is your opinion? Can you use a dual receiver upside down?

ChiefHart

Member
Apr 2, 2020
86
Staunton, Virginia
We just got a new to us tow vehicle (Toyota Tundra). We have not connected our 2009 Fleetwood Bayside yet but I am pretty sure the hitch will be a lot higher than it was with our Honda Ridgeline. I have been looking for a way to bring my bike and have been contemplating the dual receiver. Never did it with the Ridgeline because we were too close to our towing limit but we have room to spare now. Bayside 3500 lbs ~ Tundra towing capacity 9800lbs.

My question is: Do you think a dual receiver is safe to use upside down?

The "top" half looks weaker then the bottom one, so I am hesitant to turn it upside down, giving me the lower one ~ which is actually the top receiver ~ to connect the trailer to and using the higher one ~ which is actually the bottom receiver ~ to attach a bike rack (for only one cruise bike).

What do you think? Would it be safe to do this?

View attachment 88105

Personally I would rather have two separate ball mounts. For my Dodge Journey I use a drop mount, for my Chrysler T&C van I use one that has a rise, both are for the same popup trailer. That way the trailer is just about level no matter the tow vehicle I use. I expect that a ball and ball mount will cost less or the same as your pictured receiver.
 

CamperPaul

New Member
Nov 3, 2020
1
I put a 2" receiver on the front of my 2004 Tundra. East install, but had to trim the skid plate a bit. I use it for my fishing cart carrier or my bike rack and it works great.
 

Kyle R Thorson

Active Member
Aug 29, 2019
151
Arizona
Our towing capacity is 9800lbs. Trailer is 3500, so weight wise, I think we are good. I am just really having trouble finding a solution to carry my bike. The trailer was put away for the winter when we bought the truck, so I don't know for sure if we will need something lower. But when the new truck is parked beside the old truck, it is obviously higher.
I think what they are saying is not that you are cutting the tow or tounge capacity of what the actual vehicle can handle but what the tongue weight is using the device.
3500 is on the heavier side for pop ups, I have a Coleman/Fleetwood Utah also very heavy. I would advise against it as most others. There are many options available. Does your Bayside have the roof racks installed?
 

vggbrgr

New Member
Mar 23, 2016
2
I think what they are saying is not that you are cutting the tow or tounge capacity of what the actual vehicle can handle but what the tongue weight is using the device.
3500 is on the heavier side for pop ups, I have a Coleman/Fleetwood Utah also very heavy. I would advise against it as most others. There are many options available. Does your Bayside have the roof racks installed?
This is a good suggestion. I used roof rack on my Utah for carrying my bikes. Looks very cool too and I would recommend it, especially if you are under 55 yrs or so. You can add a kayak too. When I was about 35 I racked my bikes on the roof of my tow vehicle. This looked even more cool (although clearly looking cool was the priority cause it took strength). These days I just toss bikes in the bed of my truck. Pull off the front wheels and rack bikes in the bed if you would like to be neat about it. This spring I noticed that pulling bikes in and out of the truck was getting harder so next year I’m going to go with a front rack. Prolly I should have started there.
 

Sherronlee

Active Member
Apr 10, 2020
116
Northern BC
Adjustable hitch. Padded bike carrier over the tailgate and bike in the bed. Problem solved. Been doing this for years.
I am glad you found a solution that works for you, but I don't like this idea for us. I have a canopy on the truck and driving with the window open to allow this setup, would get so much dust, dirt or rain inside. I would not want everything else in there to get that dirty. But, thanks for the suggestion
 




Top